Wednesday February 19, 2020

How weight-loss surgery can avoid death

Weight-loss surgery can reduce the risk of death in middle-aged women and men

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The rate of death in individuals who did not have surgery was 2.3 per cent compared to 1.3 per cent in those who had surgery, the findings showed. Pixabay
The rate of death in individuals who did not have surgery was 2.3 per cent compared to 1.3 per cent in those who had surgery, the findings showed. Pixabay
  • Research finds bariatric surgery can reduce the risk of death in adults
  • The study was published in journal JAMA
  • The study was done by comparing two groups of people, one which had gone through the surgery and other which had not

Obese middle-aged men and women who undergo bariatric surgery for weight loss may have reduced their risk of death by 50 per cent than those tackling their weight through diet and behaviour alone, finds a study.

The rate of death in individuals who did not have surgery was 2.3 per cent compared to 1.3 per cent in those who had surgery, the findings showed.

READ MORE: How weight loss surgery will decrease heart disease risk

Previous study, published in Bariatric Surgical Practice and Patient Care, showed that men who underwent RYGB surgery reported elevated levels of the estrogen hormone estradiol and deficiency in vitamin D, factors which could negatively impact semen and fertility. Pexels
Previous study, published in Bariatric Surgical Practice and Patient Care, showed that men who underwent RYGB surgery reported elevated levels of the estrogen hormone estradiol and deficiency in vitamin D, factors which could negatively impact semen and fertility. Pexels

“We showed that a long-term effect of bariatric surgery is a longer life for obese patients. They had half the death rate, which is significant,” said Philip Greenland, Professor at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Apart from weight loss, the surgery also lowered rates of new diabetes diagnoses, improved blood pressure, and a greater proportion of diabetic individuals going into remission.

For the study, published in the journal JAMA, the team compared 8,385 people who had the surgery (65 per cent women and 35 per cent men) to 25,155 who did not, with an average age of 46 with a body mass index (BMI) of 40.

“Bariatric surgery is an increasingly frequent treatment for severe obesity,” added Laura Rasmussen-Torvik, Assistant Professor at the varsity.

However, there are various concerns about complications such as malabsorption of nutrients including vitamin deficiency, anemia and protein deficiency.

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Apart from weight loss, the surgery also lowered rates of new diabetes diagnoses, improved blood pressure, and a greater proportion of diabetic individuals going into remission. Pexels
Apart from weight loss, the surgery also lowered rates of new diabetes diagnoses, improved blood pressure, and a greater proportion of diabetic individuals going into remission. Pexels

“It’s highly effective in promoting weight loss but also invasive and can lead to short- and long-term complications,” Rasmussen-Torvik said. (IANS)

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Bariatric Surgery may Help Resolve Respiratory Issues

Weight loss surgery may improve breathing issues

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Researchers have revealed that Bariatric surgery and weight loss appear to reverse some of the negative effects of obesity on the respiratory system. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that Bariatric surgery and weight loss appear to reverse some of the negative effects of obesity on the respiratory system.

Known effects of obesity on the respiratory system include increased respiratory work, along with compromised airway resistance and respiratory muscle strength, which may all contribute to restrictive pulmonary function impairment.

As an imaging technology that provides detailed pictures of the lungs and airways, CT has great potential to improve understanding of obesity’s impact on the respiratory system.

Until now, however, there have been few CT studies evaluating obesity’s effects on the lungs and the trachea, often referred to as the windpipe.

“For the first time, this study has demonstrated changes in the CT morphology of large and small airways that improve when individuals lose weight. These features correlate with an improvement in patient symptoms,” said study lead author Susan J. Copley from Hammersmith Hospital in London.

Respiratory  weight loss
Known effects of obesity on the respiratory system include increased respiratory work. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Radiology, the research team evaluated changes in the respiratory systems of 51 obese individuals who underwent Bariatric surgery, a treatment for obese patients who haven’t responded to other weight loss approaches.

The procedure reduces the size of the stomach. All participants lost weight post-surgery with a mean body mass index decrease of 10.5 kg/m2.

The researchers used CT to measure the size and shape of the trachea and assessed air trapping, a phenomenon in which excess air remains in the lungs after exhaling, resulting in a reduction in lung function.

Air trapping is an indirect sign of obstruction in the small airways of the lung.

When the researchers compared results at baseline and six months after Bariatric surgery, they found that surgery and weight loss were associated with morphological, or structural, changes to the lung and trachea.

Also Read- Drinking Alcohol During Pregnancy Proved to be Harmful: Study

The results suggest that there may be a reversible element of small airway inflammation related to obesity and that reversal of this inflammation correlates with improvement in symptoms. The findings also point to CT as a potential marker of this inflammation.

“CT is a useful morphological marker to demonstrate subtle changes which are not easily assessed by lung function alone,” Copley said. (IANS)