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We’re not hyphenated Americans: Bobby Jindal

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bj1Washington:  Louisiana’s Indian-American governor, Piyush “Bobby”Jindal launched a historic bid for the US presidency recalling his parents’ journey to the land of “real opportunities” yet seeking to distance himself from his heritage.

His dad, who “grew up in a house without electricity or running water” and “was the only person in his family to get past the 5th grade” and “mom came to Louisiana because they believed in America,” said Jindal on Wednesday, announcing his bid for Republican nomination.

“And when they got here, they found that the legend was true,” said Jindal, 44, who became America’s youngest governor when elected to his first term in 2007, standing before a before a giant American flag at an event centre in the New Orleans suburb of Kenner, as supporters waved “Geaux Bobby” ( Go in French) signs.

“And they found that America is indeed the land of the free and home of the brave,” he said painting himself as a doer among a crowd of talkers, as he became the first Indian-American and the 13th Republican to join the 2016 White House race.

“The guy in the White House today is a great talker, and we have a bunch of great talkers running for President,” said Jindal referring to President Barack Obama and his rivals. “We’ve had enough of talkers, it’s time for a doer. I’m not running for president to be somebody, I’m running for President to do something.”

But even as he talked about his immigrant parents from Punjab “coming to an idea…and that idea is America,” he set himself against immigrants.

“We cannot allow people to immigrate to this country so that they can use our freedoms to undermine our freedoms.”

“That’s exactly what has happened in Europe, where they have 2nd and 3rd generations of immigrants who refuse to embrace the values and culture of the countries they have moved into,” Jindal said. “We must not let that happen here.”

And accusing Democratic frontrunner, Hillary Clinton of “already trying to divide us by ethnicity, by gender, and by economic status,” Jindal said: “As for me, I’m sick and tired of people dividing Americans.”

“And I’m done with all this talk about hyphenated Americans. We are not Indian-Americans, Irish-Americans, African-Americans, rich Americans, or poor Americans – we are all Americans,” he said returning to a now familiar campaign theme.

Jindal’s pronouncement came as no surprise to the over three million strong Indian-American community, which gave enthusiastic support to his Congressional and gubernatorial campaigns, but now feels alienated with such talk.

As Pearson Cross, a political science professor at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette who is writing a book on him told the Washington Post: “There’s not much Indian left in Bobby Jindal.”

Once considered a rising star of the Republican party, he has lost support within his own party too, which he once chided to stop being the “stupid party”.

In his announcement, he also took a swipe at Jeb Bush, suggesting that the Republican frontrunner was “saying that we need to hide our conservative ideals. But the truth is, if we go down that road again, we will lose again.”

Jindal’s entry into the race came two days after a Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll found him sharing the bottom of a list of 16 candidates, with zero percent of Republican primary voters picking him as their top choice against Jeb Bush’s 22 percent.

So much so, that he faces the danger of being eliminated from presidential primary debates starting August six, as Fox News and CNN are limiting the first two major debates to the top 10.

Time magazine suggested Jindal faced an “uphill climb to the nomination”, the New York said “his bid appears to be a long shot”, while the Washington Post in an editorial said Jindal had “lost his way” and Republican primary voters seeking a winner would be “more interested in a governor with a stronger record.”(IANS)

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Assassination Threats Against President-Elect Donald Trump Now Flood Twitter

The development comes as demonstrators continued to take to the streets for a second day across the US against Trump's victory in the country's presidential election

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The Twitter logo appears on a phone post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Oct. 27, 2016. VOA

NEW YORK:  Donald Trump’s shock victory in the US elections has triggered a flood of calls on Twitter and other social media outlets for the President-elect to be assassinated – and authorities will investigate all threats deemed to be credible, The New York Post has learned.

The development comes as demonstrators continued to take to the streets for a second day across the US against Trump’s victory in the country’s presidential election.

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In Portland, Oregon, an estimated 4,000 protesters chanted “We reject the president-elect!”, with some throwing objects at police, prompting several arrests.

According to The Post, a simple search on Twitter can reveal dozens and dozens of calls to gun down Trump. Some posts called for both Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence to be assassinated, and there’s even an #AssassinateTrump hashtag.

“Trump chose the literal worst case scenario as VP so nobody would try to impeach or assassinate him,” one user posted on Twitter.

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Last Saturday, Trump was rushed off a stage on in Reno, Nevada, where Secret Service agents took action after an “unidentified individual shouted ‘gun'” in front of the stage. Authorities took the man, Austyn Crites, into custody, but did not find a gun, the Secret Service said in a statement, according to the Washington Post.

Meanwhile, Trump, after blasting the media and protesters in aggressive tweets after people took to the streets to protest against the election results, Trump on Friday said he loves the “passion” of his countrymen for their country, media reported.

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“Love the fact that the small groups of protesters last night have the passion for our great country,” Trump tweeted, the New York Post reported.

“We will all come together and be proud!”

The gracious gesture – playing down the widespread protests or what police labelled as “riots” – was a change from Thursday night when Trump flashed annoyance at his detractors.

“Just had a very open and successful presidential election. Now professional protesters, incited by the media, are protesting. Very unfair!” Trump tweeted.

Thousands of protesters have taken to the streets in major cities across the US since Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton on Tuesday night, with the slogan “Not my President”.

Since Thursday, thousands of demonstrators, including immigration rights and environmental activists, have protested in cities like Boston, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, DC, in front of the Trump International Hotel.

On Wednesday in Wellsville, New York a passer-by spotted a swastika and the phrase “Make America White Again” on a softball dugout. Graffiti, with Nazi imagery and the word “Trump”, was also discovered on a storefront in Philadelphia.

Police said they would look into the incident, though they haven’t received any reports.

The New York City Police Department confirmed on Thursday that at least 65 persons were detained on different charges, including disturbing the peace and resisting arrest. (IANS)

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Ku Klux Klan (KKK) Announces Donald Trump Victory Parade in United States

The Ku Klux Klan (KKK), is a movement in the United States that has advocated extremist ideologies

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Donald Trump. Wikimedia.

New York, November 12, 2016: As President-elect Donald Trump prepares to move into the White House, one of the largest Ku Klux Klan (KKK) in the country has announced a parade in his honour, media reports said.

The Ku Klux Klan (KKK), is a movement in the United States that has advocated extremist ideologies such as white supremacy and nationalism, anti-immigration, anti-Catholicism etc. and expressed it through terrorism aimed at groups or individuals whom they opposed.

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The Loyal White Knights of Pelham, North Carolina said on its website it will hold the event on December 3, NBC news reported. The time and location of the event were not listed.

An official newspaper of the KKK had endorsed Trump days before the presidential election but Trump’s campaign was quick to reject the support.

“Mr. Trump and the campaign denounces hate in any form. This publication is repulsive and their views do not represent the tens of millions of Americans who are uniting behind our campaign,” the campaign said then in a statement.

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Trump was criticised for being slow to condemn former Klan leader David Duke after he gave the candidate his backing.

Duke celebrated Trump’s win over Democrat Hillary Clinton, tweeting early Wednesday, “This is one of the most exciting nights of my life. Make no mistake about it, our people have played a HUGE role in electing Trump!”

The announcement comes amid a background of vandalism and hate crimes by Trump supporters on minorities as well as attacks on Trump supporters and a firebombing of a Republican office in North Carolina. (IANS)

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Bobby Jindal backs down from US presidential race

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Washington: In a move that left American poll pundits surprised, Louisiana’s Indian-American Republican Governor Bobby has backed out from the 2016 US presidential race saying “this is not my time“.

Announcing his decision in Fox News on Tuesday evening, Louisiana-born son of Indian immigrant parents from Punjab, Jindal, said, “they raised me to believe Americans can do anything, and they were right, we can.

“I don’t think in a million years they would have ever imagined that I’d be governor or one day I’d be running for president of the United States,” he said.

“But I’ve come to the realization this is not my time. So I am suspending my campaign for president,” Jindal said. “Going forward, I believe we have to be the party of growth and we can never stop being the party that believes in opportunity.”

“We cannot settle for the left’s view of envy and division. We have to be the party that says everyone in this country – no matter the circumstances of their birth or who their parents are – can succeed in America.”

Asked why his candidacy didn’t take off, Jindal said, “we spent a lot of time developing detailed policy papers, and given this crazy, unpredictable election season, clearly there just wasn’t a lot of interest in those policy papers.”

He faced a variety of obstacles. Jindal was long hamstrung by weak national poll numbers, anemic fundraising as well as low approval ratings in his home state –where only a third of voters approved of his leadership. His poor performance in national polls meant that he was kept off the main stage in presidential debates and instead relegated to the undercard debate.

He is the third Republican to suspend his campaign after former Texas Governor Rick Perry and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker dropped out earlier this year.

Once seen as a rising star in the Republican Party, Jindal’s campaign failed to gain much momentum as he kept polling less than one percent in various national surveys.

A Brown University graduate and Rhodes Scholar, he rose to prominence at the start of President Barack Obama’s first term when he was asked to deliver the Republican Party’s rebuttal to the State of the Union address in 2009. But his performance was widely panned.

In announcing his departure from the race, Jindal also said he would go back
to work at his think tank, America Next.

Jindal told Fox he is not endorsing another candidate right now, but will support the eventual Republican presidential nominee.

“At the end of the day I trust the American people to select our nominee for the next president,” he said adding, “I want someone who’s got the smarts to make big changes.”

Reportedly,  Jindal believes that government experience is needed in a presidential candidate, so he is more likely to back senators Ted Cruz or Marco Rubio than Trump or Carson, the two leading candidates in the race.

(With inputs from agencies)

(Picture Courtesy: www.nola.com)