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The government would come up with the requisite notification soon, he said. Pixabay

Doing away with the no-detention policy, the West Bengal government has decided to restore the “pass-fail” system in classes 5 and 8 from the coming academic year, Education Minister Partha Chatterjee said on Friday.

Thus, students now would have to sit for examinations in classes 5 and 8 to get promoted to classes 6 and 9.


The government would come up with the requisite notification soon, he said.


Thus, students now would have to sit for examinations in classes 5 and 8 to get promoted to classes 6 and 9. Pixabay

“This decision conforms to the recommendations of the Ministry of Human Resources Development to restore the pass-fail system in classes 5 and 8,” said Chatterjee.

Also Read- Sri Lanka to Raise Funds for Children Affected by Easter Sunday Attacks

The no-detention policy till class 8 came into existence in 2010. (IANS)


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