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Revealed: Medical Colleges in India knee deep in corruption

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

July 2015: Last month, Reuters carried a special report titled “Why India’s medical schools are plagued with fraud?” that exposed various kinds of corruption that ail Indian medical schools.

They investigated into the working of the Muzaffarnagar Medical College, which is located 80 miles northeast of New Delhi. The college has been found to be using fake “patients” in its hospitals whenever there is a government inspection to check whether there were enough patients to provide students with adequate clinical experience.

The report claims that through a four-month investigation, they have documented the full extent of the fraud in India’s medical education system.

Some of the highlights of the report that bring forward the extent of corruption in the medical system are as follows-

1. Among the 398 medical schools present in the country, one out of every six of them have been accused of cheating.
2. To pass government inspections, medical colleges regularly use recruitment agencies to hire doctors to pose as full time faculties.
3. The medical colleges also hire healthy people to act as patients during inspections.
4. According to government records, since 2010 at least 69 medical colleges and teaching hospitals have been accused of frauds ranging from hiring doctors and fake patients to rigging entrance exams and accepting bribes.
5. Bribery is very rampant. Medical schools accept bribes under the guise of donations. The Medical Council of India which is supposed to regulate medical education itself mired in various lawsuits.
6. The crisis of the Indian medical system can been seen manifested in Indian doctors practicing abroad as well. According to Britain’s General Medical Council’s record, between 2008 and 2014, Indian-trained doctors were four times more likely to lose their right to practice than British­-trained doctors.
7. According to Indian Medical Association, about 45% of the people who practice medicine in India have no formal training.
8. The medical education in India began to decline after the change in law in 1990’s which made the process of opening private colleges in India a lot easier.Many of the private colleges have been set up by businessmen and politicians who have no experience in the medical field. This has resulted in corruption and poor education resulting in poor quality of doctors who pass out of these colleges.

The investigation also unearthed an email from Hi Impact Consultants to a doctor in New Delhi, offering to pay an amount of Rs-20,000/- a day, if the doctor agreed to appear for an inspection at Saraswathi Institute of Medical Sciences in Hapur, east of New Delhi.

As if to demonstrate that every cloud has a silver lining, the report quotes David Gordon, the president of World Federation for Medical Education as saying- “The best medical schools in India are absolutely world class”.

Next Story

New Survey Indicates, Indians Worry About Terrorism, Unemployment And Corruption The Most

"At least 73 per cent Indians are optimistic that as a nation we are headed in the right direction. The global average paints a dismal image, where the majority (58 per cent) feels that they are headed in the wrong direction," the findings showed.

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The "What Worries the World Global Survey" by global market research firm Ipsos showed that 45 per cent of Indians are most worried about terrorism, 44 per cent about unemployment and jobs and 42 per cent about financial and political corruption. Pixabay

 As the country entered the seven-phase voting from April 11, a new survey said on Monday that Indians are most worried about terrorism, followed by unemployment and corruption.

The “What Worries the World Global Survey” by global market research firm Ipsos showed that 45 per cent of Indians are most worried about terrorism, 44 per cent about unemployment and jobs and 42 per cent about financial and political corruption.

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India, however, bucked the global trend of pessimism where 22 countries out of the total of the 28 markets covered in the survey felt their country is on the wrong track. Pixabay

Apart from these issues, a significant number of Indians are also concerned about crime and violence (33 per cent) and poverty and social inequality (29 per cent).

“Pulwama terror strike has propelled terrorism to the fore. It was way down in the pecking order in the past waves. Terrorism is bothering Indians most. Likewise, lack of jobs is weighing on the minds of Indians and government,” said Parijat Chakraborty, Service Line Leader, Ipsos Public Affairs, Customer Experience and Corporate Reputation.

“Similarly, more concrete steps are needed for tackling corruption. While strategies are being formulated by the government to address them, our survey shows that Indians are preoccupied with concerns around these macro issues and will like them to be mitigated,” Chakraborty added.

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Meanwhile China (94 per cent) inspires the most confidence about its national direction as 9 in 10 Chinese citizens say that the country is moving in the right direction. Pixabay

India, however, bucked the global trend of pessimism where 22 countries out of the total of the 28 markets covered in the survey felt their country is on the wrong track.

“At least 73 per cent Indians are optimistic that as a nation we are headed in the right direction. The global average paints a dismal image, where the majority (58 per cent) feels that they are headed in the wrong direction,” the findings showed.

Meanwhile China (94 per cent) inspires the most confidence about its national direction as 9 in 10 Chinese citizens say that the country is moving in the right direction.

Also Read: Ex-Afghanistan Warlord Claims, ‘No Doubt’ Pakistan ‘Supports’ Taliban
Saudi Arabia is in the second place (84 per cent), followed by India (73 per cent) and Malaysia (57 per cent).

The survey was conducted in 28 countries where 20,019 interviews were conducted between February 22-March 8. (IANS)