Tuesday September 24, 2019
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Farmers welfare: What Indian agricultural sector needs to learn from Denmark?

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By Prachi Mishra

Every day, from breakfast to dinner, our lives are touched by the farmers as the food we eat is cultivated by them. But never even once, a thought crosses our minds about the sacrifices peasants make so we can enjoy our daily bread.

This year itself, thousands of farmers have ended their lives because they were unable to provide basic sustenance to their families.

The poor farmers are vulnerable to a larger variety of risks, which not only affect individuals, but their households or the entire community. Other than the risk of injuries, accidents, underemployment, these farmers also have to deal with the risk of natural calamities like heavy rainfall, droughts, cyclones, etc.

The condition of the farmers in India is deplorable, and over the last 67 years since Independence, the political parties have used them only for political gains. Indian politicians, instead of coming up with solutions to the woes of the farmers, keep lamenting about the situation.

What is needed by the government is to adopt the policies, which have been tried and tested in the nations where farmers live a dignified life. One such example from which India could take cues is of Denmark.

Denmark is renowned for its profitable agriculture sector. In India, the farmers, who cultivate food for the country, cannot provide their own families with two square meals, while in Denmark, the farmers produce food sufficient to feed three times of its actual population. The farmers in Denmark are given proper education of around 4.5 years to enhance their skills and competency. The marketing and food companies are owned by the farmers themselves, unlike India where the agro-based companies are owned by industrialists who eat away the farmer’s share of profit.

Danish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has laid down certain rules regarding the storage of manure, livestock farming, handling and storage of manure. Some of the rules are:

·          Cover on manure storage

·          Education for farmers using chemicals

·          Updated list on safe pesticides

·          Safe storage of chemical fertilizers and pesticides

India should take up Denmark as a model to improve the livelihood of its farmers. Instead of handing over the control to multinational corporations, the government can form farmer cooperatives, which could look into the production as well as the marketing of agricultural goods. Farmers should also be aided with proper education and infrastructure.

It’s not that India does not have plans to provide the farmers with subsidies and welfare schemes. Every now and then, we see political leaders supporting pro-farmer movements and coming up with new proposals to aid them. Several NGOs represents the vulnerability of farmers and urges the government to support them. Then, why are the Indian farmers still sustaining in a deplorable condition?

We have enough social protection plans in our country to redress the grievances of the farmers. It’s just that these plans are not implemented properly. Therefore, instead of coming up with new schemes, the government should make sure that the existing welfare program are exhausted to their full extent to benefit the farmers.

  • In india schemes r just on papers and r only to fill their own pocket.In india Talent and merit r given second importance.Double faced few indians like to be called Progressive but the truth is they love their backwardness.Denmark is also know for its Cattle breading milk production….
    Long way to go but this is a beautiful and encouraging articles.

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  • In india schemes r just on papers and r only to fill their own pocket.In india Talent and merit r given second importance.Double faced few indians like to be called Progressive but the truth is they love their backwardness.Denmark is also know for its Cattle breading milk production….
    Long way to go but this is a beautiful and encouraging articles.

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Automotive Industry To Benefit From Corporate Tax Cut, Says ICRA

India's automotive industry is likely to be one of the key beneficiaries of the recent corporate tax cut, credit ratings agency ICRA said on Monday

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India, Tax cut, Automotive Industry
India's automotive industry is likely to be one of the key beneficiaries of the recent corporate tax cut. Wikimedia Commons

India’s automotive industry is likely to be one of the key beneficiaries of the recent corporate tax cut, credit ratings agency ICRA said on Monday.

“Under the current weak demand conditions, OEMs (original equipment manufacturers) are expected to pass on some of the benefits of tax revision to the end consumers,” ICRA Vice President and Sector Head Pavethra Ponniah was quoted in a statement.

“This implies that the price correction in coming months will to an extent address the demand side issues. Moreover, clarity from the government, that there is no further GST or cess revision, will help consumers who were waiting for improved clarity prior to their car purchase decision,” she added.

According to ICRA, the current reduction of corporate tax rates in India to globally competitive levels will incentivise OEMs and their vendors to increase localisation, which augurs well for the industry.

In 2019-2020, India has imported auto components worth $17.6 billion.

India, Tax cut, Automotive Industry
the current reduction of corporate tax rates in India to globally competitive levels will incentivise OEMs and their vendors to increase localisation. Pixabay

ICRA also said that given the increasing US-China trade tensions, revision in corporate tax will attract FDI in Indian manufacturing sector, as the revised tax structure is now in line with other emerging markets.

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“In the current fiscal, the Indian automotive industry, especially the passenger vehicle segment, has witnessed one of the worst slides since the last two decades because of multiple factors,” the ratings agency said in a statement.

“Tighter financing environment for consumers and the liquidity crunch faced by dealerships coupled with weak farm income and overall slowdown in economic activity has impacted consumer sentiments and purchasing behaviour,” the statement added. (IANS)