Tuesday February 19, 2019
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8 things you should do during an earthquake according to Indian Meteorological Department

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Image: Prabhas Sharma

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Despite galloping scientific achievements that the mankind has witnessed, we have never been able to question the invincibility of Nature. While the textbooks are filled with lessons on kinds of earthquake, there is still no breakthrough on any earthquake prediction mechanism. In such a scenario, the best bet for any country, to deal with such a horrendous event is to be prepared for the worst, while hoping for the best.

Here are a few things that you should do during a quake according to the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) :

During an earthquake: 

  1. Keep calm and reassure others.

  2. During the event, the safest place is an open space, away from the buildings.

  3. If you are indoors, take cover under a desk, table, bed or doorways and against inside wall.

  4. Stay away from glass doors, glass panes, window or outside doors.

  5. Do not rush to go out of the building, where there are large number of people to avoid stampede.

  6. If you are outside, move away from building and utility wires.

  7. Once in the open, stay there till the vibrations stops.

  8. Don not use candles, matches or open flames.

Image: Sagar Ghimre
Image: Sagar Ghimre

 After an earthquake: 

  • Do not spread and do not believe rumors.
  • Keep stock of drinking water, foodstuff and first-aid equipment in accessible place.
  • Turn on your transistor or television to get the latest information/bulletins and aftershock warnings.
  • Be prepared for aftershocks as these may strike.
  • Close the valve of kitchen gas stove, if it is on. If it is closed, do not open. Do not use open flames.
  • Do not operate electric switches or appliances, if gas leaks are suspected.
  • Check water pipes, electric lines and fittings. If damaged, shut off the main valves. Do not touch live wires of electricity.

 

 

Next Story

New Device to Detect Low Fluoride in Water

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has set 1.5 mg/litre as the maximum limit for fluoride in drinking water

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Orcas
This September 2015 photo from NOAA Fisheries shows an adult female orca and her calf, in Washington state's Puget Sound. Researchers reported Jan. 11, 2019, that there's a new calf among killer whales that live in the waters between Washington state and Canada. VOA

Researchers have built a new device to accurately measure fluoride concentrations using only a few drops of water with even low contamination, finds a new study.

In India, low concentration of fluoride – below 1.5 mg/litre – is used to prevent tooth decay and strengthening of bones. But if it touches above 2 ppm it could cause serious health issues, like dental and bone disease, especially in children and developing foetuses.

That’s where the device – SION-105 – comes in. It’s portable, considerably cheaper than ones in use now, and can be used on-site by anyone. In addition, it is luminescent by default, but darkens when it encounters fluoride ions.

Measuring fluoride at low concentrations with sufficient accuracy is expensive and requires a well-equipped chemical lab.

australia, underwater
A man snorkels in an area called the “Coral Gardens” near Lady Elliot Island, on the Great Barrier Reef, off Queensland, Australia, June 11, 2015. Scientists recently found similar-looking coral reefs in much deeper water off Tasmania. VOA

Kyriakos Stylianou at EPFL Valais Wallis in Switzerland said SION-105 detects fluorides by adding only a few droplets of water and by monitoring the colour change of the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs).

The study was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

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Adding fluoride to water has been a common practice in many countries, including the US, Australia, Brazil, Malaysia, India and Vietnam, especially in low concentrations – below 1.5 mg/litre.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has set 1.5 mg/litre as the maximum limit for fluoride in drinking water. (IANS)