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What Does Your Coffee Say About You?

Latte drinkers tended to be intent on pleasing others, but could also show slightly more neurotic attributes

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coffee
Hot coffee contains more antioxidants than cold coffee. Pixabay

Coffee is considered one of the favourite drinks across the nation but aside from providing the often needed early morning boost, the type of coffee a person likes to drink can also reveal a lot about his personality, says a study.

Clinical psychologist Ramani Durvasula analysed 1,000 coffee lovers and examined common personality styles and psychological traits, looking specifically at introversion and extroversion, patience, perfectionism, warmth, vigilance, sensitivity and social boldness, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

In her results, Durvasula found that those with a penchant for black coffee are typically purist, no-nonsense individuals with a tendency to prefer the simple life, although they could also be abrupt, impatient and even averse to change.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

In contrast, latte drinkers tended to be intent on pleasing others, but could also show slightly more neurotic attributes.

Cappuccino drinkers are usually “Perfectionist” and are perhaps the most high-demand personality. The research also says that such drinkers are very obsessive and controlling, overly sensitive, and health-conscious.

Instant coffee drinkers seemed to display more laid-back characteristics in the findings of her study however. Personality traits associated with this group included a predisposition to procrastinate and put off things that need doing.

Finally, those who preferred their coffee fix cold and sweet were considered socially bold “trend-setters” who could be reckless on occasion. (Bollywood Country)

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Here’s How The Microbes Help You Make a Perfect Cup of Coffee

Besides lactic acid bacteria, other micro-organisms that play a role during wet coffee fermentation include enterobacteria, yeasts, acetic acid bacteria, bacilli and filamentous fungi. But it is still not known how most bacteria influence this process, De Vuyst said

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A barista pours steamed milk into a cup of coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles, Sept. 22, 2017. State health officials proposed a regulation change Friday that would declare coffee doesn't present a significant cancer risk, countering a California court ruling.
A barista pours steamed milk into a cup of coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles, Sept. 22, 2017. State health officials proposed a regulation change Friday that would declare coffee doesn't present a significant cancer risk, countering a California court ruling. VOA

Ever wondered what makes your coffee taste good? It’s the microbes, finds a study.

The study showed that lactic acid bacteria which help in the longer fermentation of coffee beans results in better taste, contrary to conventional wisdom.

“A cup of coffee is the final product of a complex chain of operations: farming, post-harvest processing, roasting and brewing,” said lead investigator Luc De Vuyst, Professor at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, in Belgium.

There are several variants of post-harvest processing, among which wet processing and dry processing are the most common. Wet processing — commonly used for Arabica and specialty coffees — is the step that includes fermentation.

The research, published in the Applied and Environmental Microbiology journal, was carried out at an experimental farm in Ecuador. The team found that during extended fermentation, leuconostocs — a genus of lactic acid bacteria used in the fermentation of cabbage to sauerkraut and in sourdough starters — declined in favour of lactobacilli.

coffee
Hot coffee contains more antioxidants than cold coffee. Pixabay

Lactic acid bacteria were already present before fermentation, and these acid tolerant lactobacilli proliferated even more during this process.

“It is challenging to draw a causal link between the microbiota and the volatile compounds in the beans — those compounds that contribute to the coffee’s smell — since many of these compounds can be of microbial, endogenous bean metabolism, or chemical origin,” De Vuyst said.

But De Vuyst noted that the microbial communities, in particular the lactic acid bacteria, showed an impact.

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It may have “had a protective effect toward coffee quality during fermentation because of their acidification of the fermenting mass, providing a stable microbial environment and hence preventing growth of undesirable micro-organisms that often lead to off-flavours,” he said.

Besides lactic acid bacteria, other micro-organisms that play a role during wet coffee fermentation include enterobacteria, yeasts, acetic acid bacteria, bacilli and filamentous fungi. But it is still not known how most bacteria influence this process, De Vuyst said. (IANS)