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What Does Your Coffee Say About You?

Latte drinkers tended to be intent on pleasing others, but could also show slightly more neurotic attributes

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Hot coffee contains more antioxidants than cold coffee. Pixabay
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Coffee is considered one of the favourite drinks across the nation but aside from providing the often needed early morning boost, the type of coffee a person likes to drink can also reveal a lot about his personality, says a study.

Clinical psychologist Ramani Durvasula analysed 1,000 coffee lovers and examined common personality styles and psychological traits, looking specifically at introversion and extroversion, patience, perfectionism, warmth, vigilance, sensitivity and social boldness, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

In her results, Durvasula found that those with a penchant for black coffee are typically purist, no-nonsense individuals with a tendency to prefer the simple life, although they could also be abrupt, impatient and even averse to change.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

In contrast, latte drinkers tended to be intent on pleasing others, but could also show slightly more neurotic attributes.

Cappuccino drinkers are usually “Perfectionist” and are perhaps the most high-demand personality. The research also says that such drinkers are very obsessive and controlling, overly sensitive, and health-conscious.

Instant coffee drinkers seemed to display more laid-back characteristics in the findings of her study however. Personality traits associated with this group included a predisposition to procrastinate and put off things that need doing.

Finally, those who preferred their coffee fix cold and sweet were considered socially bold “trend-setters” who could be reckless on occasion. (Bollywood Country)

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Your Genes Determine You As a Tea or Coffee Person

"The findings suggest our perception of bitter tastes, informed by our genetics, contributes to the preference for coffee, tea and alcohol," Cornelis said

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Your genes make you tea or coffee lover: Study. Pixabay

Are you a tea or coffee person? The answer may lie in your genetic predisposition towards bitter tastes, say researchers.

It could be because bitterness acts as a natural warning system to protect us from harmful substances.

The study, led by researchers from US-based Northwestern University, and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Australia, explored reactions to three bitter substances — caffeine, quinine and propylthiouracil (PROP) — to understand how they affect people’s preference for drinking tea, coffee and alcohol.

The findings showed that people who were more sensitive to caffeine and were drinking a lot of coffee consumed low amounts of tea.

In other words, people who have a heightened ability to taste coffee’s bitterness — and particularly the distinct bitter flavour of caffeine — learn to associate “good things with it”.

“You’d expect that people who are particularly sensitive to the bitter taste of caffeine would drink less coffee,” said Marilyn Cornelis, assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

tea
The findings showed that people who were more sensitive to caffeine and were drinking a lot of coffee consumed low amounts of tea. Pixabay

“The opposite results of our study suggest coffee consumers acquire a taste or an ability to detect caffeine due to the learned positive reinforcement (stimulation) elicited by caffeine.”

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, also found that people sensitive to the bitter flavours of quinine and of PROP — a synthetic taste related to the compounds in cruciferous vegetables — avoid coffee.

For alcohol, a higher sensitivity to the bitterness of PROP resulted in lower alcohol consumption, particularly of red wine.

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“The findings suggest our perception of bitter tastes, informed by our genetics, contributes to the preference for coffee, tea and alcohol,” Cornelis said.

Scientists applied Mendelian randomisation — a technique commonly used in disease epidemiology — to test the causal relationship between bitter taste and beverage consumption in more than 4,00,000 men and women in the UK. (IANS)