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What’s Under The Hat? Hair Tips For Women

Celebrity hairstylist Paul Edmonds, who has over 30 years in the industry, explains the must haves hair tips that one should try before stepping out with your hats on, reports femalefirst.co.uk

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What's Under The Hat? Hair Tips For Women
Always carry with you a hat or hairband to protect your hair from damage. Pixabay

Even if you’re wearing the most elaborate and stylish hat for a day out at a race course, it’s important to emphasise on your hairstyle so as to not kill the look.

Celebrity hairstylist Paul Edmonds, who has over 30 years in the industry, explains the must haves hair tips that one should try before stepping out with your hats on, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

* Hair normally looks better worn back and away from the face, especially if it your hat has a large brim.

hat
Representational image. Pixabay

* If your hair is long and you want a simple quick hairdo, try putting your hair in a low ponytail and split the hair behind the band down the middle and pass the tail through itself and pull tight to get a soft, rolled up look.

* Long hair can also be plated and finished with a binding of ribbon.

* If you have shorter hair, tuck the sides back or leave them out until the hat is on and then fold them back and grip under the hat.

Also Read: Three Mistakes Women Make While Buying Heels

* Always practice wearing a hat before the occasion as panic does not help give a great style.

* If all else fails, get a professional blow-dry. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Dandruff in Hair Cause Of Worry for Patients With IBD

While most studies on the microbiome focus on bacteria, Underhill's team investigates the fungi's presence and its potential role in intestinal disease.

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Crohn's disease is a type of IBD that causes inflammation of the digestive tract, leading to abdominal pain, diarrohea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition. Pixabay

A fungus linked to dandruff in the hair may worsen intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients with a certain genetic makeup, new research has found.

Malassezia restricta yeasts found in oily skin and scalp follicles are linked to several skin conditions. These microscopic fungi also often end up in the gut.

In particular, M. restricta was elevated in Crohn’s patients carrying a genetic variation known as the IBD CARD9 risk allele, according to the study published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.

fungus
While most studies on the microbiome focus on bacteria, Underhill’s team investigates the fungi’s presence and its potential role in intestinal disease. Pixabay

Crohn’s disease is a type of IBD that causes inflammation of the digestive tract, leading to abdominal pain, diarrohea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition.

“We were surprised to find that Malassezia restrica was more common on intestinal tissue surfaces in Crohn’s disease patients than in healthy people,” said study co-author David Underhill from the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

“Further, the presence of Malassezia was linked to a common variation in a gene known to be important for immunity to fungi – a genetic signature more common in patients with Crohn’s disease than the healthy population,” Underhill said.

hair
A fungus linked to dandruff in the hair may worsen intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients with a certain genetic makeup, new research has found. Pixabay

IBD is characterised by changes in immune responses to the intestinal microbiome.

Also Read: Instagram Developing A New Format To Promote “Branded Content Ads”

While most studies on the microbiome focus on bacteria, Underhill’s team investigates the fungi’s presence and its potential role in intestinal disease.

Changes in intestinal fungi such as M. restricta – and host responses to these fungi – may be a factor in exacerbating symptoms that contribute to disease in a subset of patients with Crohn’s disease, said co-author Jose Limon, a Cedars-Sinai research team member. (IANS)