Thursday December 13, 2018
Home Lead Story WhatsApp Back...

WhatsApp Backups Won’t be Taking Your Space on Google Drive Anymore

Backing up your chats and media to Google Drive is helpful because when you change Android phones or get a new one, your chats and media remain transferable

0
//
WhatsApp
New Australia bill gives police power to spy on WhatsApp messages.
Republish
Reprint

Google is making life easy for WhatsApp users as starting this November, 1.5 billion users of this popular instant messaging platform will be able to back up their data on Google Drive without worrying about storage space.

“Starting November 12, 2018, WhatsApp backups will no longer count towards the Google Drive storage quota,” WhatsApp said in an update on its FAQ page.

Until now, WhatsApp backup data counted towards the space one had on Google Drive.

According to a report in The Verge on Thursday, unlike other texting apps that store messages on their servers, Facebook-owned WhatsApp requires users to back up their messages to another company’s Cloud service to sync chats between phones.

Apple users have their messages stored in iCloud, while Android users have always used Google Drive, it added.

WhatsApp
WhatsApp on a smartphone device. Pixabay

WhatsApp also warned that with the November update, backups that have not been updated in more than one year will be automatically removed from Google Drive storage.

“To avoid the loss of any backups, we recommend you manually back up your WhatsApp data before November 12, 2018,” WhatsApp said.

You May Also Like to Read About The New Smartphone by Samsung- Samsung to Unveil Galaxy A Smartphone Soon

Backing up your chats and media to Google Drive is helpful because when you change Android phones or get a new one, your chats and media remain transferable.

“We recommend connecting your phone to Wi-Fi prior to backing up your chats via Google Drive, as backup files can vary in size and consume mobile data, causing additional charges,” WhatsApp said. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

New Australia Bill Gives Police Power to Spy on WhatsApp Messages

The spying powers are limited to only "serious offences" such as preventing terrorism and tackling organised crime in Australia, dailymail.co.uk reported

0
WhatsApp
New Australia bill gives police power to spy on WhatsApp messages.

Australia is mulling a strict law that gives enforcement agencies power to track messages on platforms like WhatsApp and Telegram that offer end-to-end encryption and also to force users to open their smartphones when demanded, a media report said.

The controversial encryption bill comes at a time amid allegations of encrypted platforms facilitating spread of rumours, hate speech and even criminal activities like child trafficking and drugs businesses.

In countries like India messages circulated in WhatsApp have been linked to several lynching cases, forcing the government to ask platform to take suitable preventive action.

But the new Australia bill also raises privacy concerns as under the proposed legislation, the Australian government agencies could compel companies to build spyware.

The proposed laws could force companies to remove electronic protections, assist government agencies in accessing material from a suspect’s device, and in getting technical information such as design specifications to help in an investigation, News.com.au reported on Wednesday.

whatsapp
WhatsApp on a smartphone device. Pixabay

Critics have slammed the bill for being broad in scope, vague and potentially damaging to the security of the global digital economy, the report said, adding that a Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security has been scrutinising the bill.

The laws will help security agencies nab terrorists, child sex offenders and other serious criminals, Australia’s Attorney-General Christian Porter was quoted as saying.

Also Read- Rahul Gandhi Accuses Narendra Modi of Questioning Patel’s Vision

About 95 per cent of people currently being surveilled by security agencies are using encrypted messages, he added.

The spying powers are limited to only “serious offences” such as preventing terrorism and tackling organised crime in Australia, dailymail.co.uk reported. (IANS)