Wednesday March 20, 2019
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WhatsApp message to wrong number got this man his Date

"I had given up on love and then Michael sent that message and literally landed in my life," Dahlbeck added

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Whatsapp, Pixabay

Love is beautiful… Perhaps a little more so when someone finds it without putting much of an effort. But can it blossom even from an innocent WhatsApp message sent to a wrong number? Michael Evangelou from Colliers Wood in south London would say ‘yes’.

Evangelou, 44, sent a message, which read “Girls Trip”, to a number he thought was his own as a reminder to see the film at the cinema. It sparked a conversation with a stranger and ultimately led to their marriage, independent.co.uk reported on Monday.

The recipient happened to be Lina Dahlbeck, 37, from Morden in south London, who sent a reply reply saying, “Hi! Girls trip? Who’s this please? I’m guessing this was intended for another Lina”.

A wrong Whatsapp message led to this couple’s love story. Youtube

The pair struck up a conversation as they attempted to figure out exactly what had happened. Despite never meeting, the two chatted for most of the day before arranging to meet for a drink later that night.

“We started chatting back and forth. I think if I wasn’t single I wouldn’t have continued the chat,” Dahlbeck was quoted as saying. And just four hours after that WhatsApp message, they were on a date.

“We were convinced it was fate that had brought us together,” Dahlbeck said. The couple married on December 7 and in March, they are jetting off to Dubai where Dahlbeck aims to launch a make-up school.

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“Most of our friends thought we were a bit nuts,” Dahlbeck said, adding that parents of both of them were delighted at the prospect of marriage. The couple insists that their story is a lesson to others not to give up on love.

“I had given up on love and then Michael sent that message and literally landed in my life,” Dahlbeck added. “My story gives hope to everyone: never give up,” she added. IANS

Next Story

WhatsApp, NASSCOM to Impart Digital Literacy

These volunteers will post their takeaways from the workshops on their social media handles to increase the reach of these safety messages

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facebook privacy, whatsapp
FILE - The WhatsApp icon is seen on a smartphone in this picture illustration, in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. VOA

In a bid to curb fake news during the general elections, WhatsApp and NASSCOM Foundation on Monday came together to impart digital literacy training.

As part of the partnership, WhatsApp and NASSCOM Foundation will train nearly 1,00,000 Indians to spot false information and provide tips and tricks to stay safe on WhatsApp.

The co-created curriculum, which includes real-world anecdote tools that can be used to verify a forwarded message and actions that users can take like reporting problematic content to fact checkers and other law enforcement agencies, will be disseminated in multiple regional languages.

“We are excited to expand our partnerships with civil society to advance crucial digital literacy skills that can help combat misinformation share on WhatsApp,” Abhijit Bose, Head of India, WhatsApp, said in a statement.

“This training educates people throughout India to be mindful of the messages they receive and to verify the facts before forwarding,” he added.

The training will be imparted by volunteers from NASSCOM Foundation who will launch the “each one teach three” campaign that mandates every volunteer to share their learnings with three more persons leading to a network effect.

Users can set verification to be required immediately upon log-in. Pixabay

These volunteers will post their takeaways from the workshops on their social media handles to increase the reach of these safety messages.

The first training will be on March 27 in Delhi and will be followed by more planned interventions like hosting training workshops for representatives from rural and urban areas along with roadshows across numerous colleges.

“The use of technology platforms like WhatsApp are inherently meant to foster social good, harmony, and collaboration, but are sadly being used by a small number of miscreants to entice anger and hatred by spreading false and doctored information,” Ashok Pamidi, CEO, NASSCOM Foundation, said.

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“I would like to urge all the connected citizens who want to join this fight against the spread of fake information, to come and help volunteer towards the cause,” Pamidi added.

Aspiring volunteers can register at www.mykartavya.nasscomfoundation.org

NASSCOM Foundation is the social arm of the industry body, National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM). (IANS)