Monday May 27, 2019
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Launch of WhatsApp Pay in India Can Hamper Paytm’s Future Plans

The WhatsApp Pay service in India may become fully operational in the next four to five months, said media reports

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Paytm Logo. Wikimedia

Twitterati on Monday went berserk after the news of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg actively working on to launch WhatsApp Pay in India and how it can hamper Paytm’s future plans spread like a wildfire.

IANS on Sunday reported, quoting industry analysts, that WhatsApp Pay is going to be the real game changer in the burgeoning Indian digital payments industry, likely to hit the $1-trillion mark by 2023.

“Paytm was most excited when demonitisation was announced and that digital will make India. Just 2 years down the line Paytm is facing extinction,” tweeted Joseph Oommen.

“Well it was a WAR waiting to happen for sure…” tweeted entrepreneur Ajay Nandiwdekar.

WhatsApp currently has over 300 million users in India and once it starts peer-to-peer (P2P) UPI-based payments service, it would be in a real strong position.

Paytm. Wikimedia

“Winter’s coming for Paytm,” tweeted Rohit Kuttapan, a digital marketer.

“Your punchline may get changed from ‘Paytm Karo’ to “Paytm bhi kar lo” ! After #Whatsapp Payment. Lol,” tweeted Anoop Mishra, one of the nation’s leading social media experts.

Another Twitter user Tanmay said: “WhatsApp Pay RIP Paytm”.

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WhatsApp on May 3 told the Supreme Court that it would comply with the Reserve Bank of India’s data localisation norms before launching the full payments service in the country.

The WhatsApp Pay service in India may become fully operational in the next four to five months, said media reports. (IANS)

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Famous Fitness Programme CrossFit Quits Facebook, Instagram Citing Security Concerns

The company has also accused the social networking giant of deleting the accounts of communities that have identified the corrupted nutritional science responsible for unchecked global chronic disease

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Facebook, photos
This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

Citing security concerns, famous fitness and lifestyle programme CrossFit has quit Facebook and Instagram.

Recently, Facebook deleted Crossfit’s “Banting7DayMealPlan” user group with 1.65 million followers without any warning or explanation that triggered the US-based fitness company to take the decision, which was further fuelled by public security complaints against the platform.

“All activities on CrossFit, Inc.’s Facebook and Instagram accounts were suspended as of May 22, as CrossFit investigates the circumstances pertaining to Facebook’s deletion of the ‘Banting7DayMealPlan’ and other public complaints about the social-media company that may adversely impact the security and privacy of our global CrossFit community,” CrossFit, Inc. wrote in a blog-post on Friday.

According to the post, complaints against Facebook and Instagram include collection and sharing of user-information and Facebook’s government collaboration for citizen surveillance programmes.

facebook privacy
FILE – The Instagram icon is displayed on a mobile screen in Los Angeles. VOA

Facebook selling user information, censoring news feeds, maintaining weak intellectual property (IP) protections and poor security protocols have also been listed as reasons why CrossFit decided to remove its presence from Facebook and its photo-messaging app Instagram.

“For these reasons, CrossFit, Inc. has placed Facebook and its associated properties under review and will no longer support or use Facebook’s services until further notice,” the post noted.

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The company has also accused the social networking giant of deleting the accounts of communities that have identified the corrupted nutritional science responsible for unchecked global chronic disease. (IANS)