Sunday August 19, 2018

When Bees help Humans and Elephants survive in Kenya

HEC (Human elephant coexistence) program in African countries gained popularity in recent years and helped minimizing human - elephants riots

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Kenyan elephants are not restricted to wildlife sanctuaries or reserves, hence continuous harm by them to the locals and their lands and farms is common In African regions. Being one of the biggest animals they see humans as their biggest threat, hence farmers won’t see a way to sustain them from entering and damaging their crops and farms.

Discovering lethal and well accepted ways to prevent the over exploitation by the Elephants in the African areas is one of the biggest challenges elephant and wildlife managers seek across African region. Even tons of elephants are killed every year for their ivory tusks, farmers continue to fight for their survival with them and poaching is devastating the survival of animals in Africa.

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Dr Lucky king the winner UNEP/CMS Thesis Award and head of HEC (Human elephant coexistence) program managed to prove an experiment that would render elephant helpless when they hear bee’s buzzing sound or come across beehives on their way to the fields, thus forcing them to change their direction and force them to return. She laid down the research in Kenya Sabo East national park with 22 farmers under which a beehive fence is made with hives at a distance of 10mts with 10-21 hives a single fence and are made cheaply with the cost of 150$-500$ per 100m of fence and equipped with locally available material. Dr King and her team members discovered that the project success rate is well above 85% and it helped farmers boost their income by up to 30% as the honey is well demanded in international market.

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The strategy also helped the farmers by improving their daily life with less elephant conflicts moreover increase in their income from 300$ a year by upto 30%.

Lucy King won The St Andrews Prize for the Environment for the extraordinary and unique research and quoted saying “I am delighted with this win. The recognition and financial support will enable us to expand our vital research work and protect many more rural farming families from elephant invasions.”

-by Shivang Goel. He is an intern at NewsGram. Twitter:@Shivang997

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Maths Could Help Understand The Spread of Infectious Diseases

Fear of public pathogens may end up driving the wrong type of behaviour if the public's information is incorrect.

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Maths can help reveal how human behaviour spreads infectious diseases
Maths can help reveal how human behaviour spreads infectious diseases. Flickr

Researchers have found that maths could help public health workers understand how human behaviour influences the spread of infectious diseases like Ebola and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

Current models used to predict the emergence and evolution of pathogens within host populations did not include social behaviour.

But adding dynamic social interactions to the new model could allow scientists to better prevent undesirable outcomes, such as more dangerous mutant strains from evolving and spreading.

“We tend to treat disease systems in isolation from social systems, and we often don’t think about how they connect to each other or influence each other,” said Chris Bauch, Professor at Waterloo University in Canada.

Injection and medicines
he team used computer simulations to analyse how the mathematical model behaved under various possible scenarios. Pixabay

“This gives us a better appreciation of how social reactions to infectious diseases can influence which strains become prominent in the population,” Bauch added.

In the study, published in the Journal of Theoretical Biology, the team used computer simulations to analyse how the mathematical model behaved under various possible scenarios.

They observed that human behaviour often changes dramatically during the outbreak, for instance, they might start using face masks.

Also Read: Cholera Infection May be on Edge in Yemen, Says WHO

Also, fear of public pathogens may end up driving the wrong type of behaviour if the public’s information is incorrect.

The new modelling could help public responses navigate and better channel these kinds of population responses, the researchers said. (IANS)