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“Whispering Toros” : Journey of Artist Kanchan Chander narrated through work in New Delhi

Artist Kanchan Chander has created expressions though her drawings, paintings and installations with a unique charisma to engage her audience

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Artist Kanchan Chander, drawing
Artist Kanchan Chander has created expressions though her drawings, paintings and installations with a unique charisma to engage her audience.
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  • Artist Kanchan Chander has created expressions through her drawings, paintings
  • Earlier, her works were based on torsos that were minimal, monumental and sparse with decorative and embellished motifs
  • Highlights of the show include a paper collage on plastic mannequin torsos which are bold, funky and vibrant

New Delhi, August 19, 2017: The journey of an artist is encapsulated in her ongoing timeline narrating where she began from to now, when she engages with her subject before putting life in them.

Artist Kanchan Chander has created expressions through her drawings, paintings and installations with a unique charisma to engage her audience.

Her show titled, “Whispering Toros” is on for view here at Visual Arts Gallery, India Habitat Center, till August 23.

Kiran. K. Mohan has curated the exhibition.

“As a curator, it is my very first interaction with Kanchan and her works in her studio bring across a great sense of bonding,” Mohan said.

“I have followed her as an artist for years and have silently related to her works which are thought-provoking, dealing with the issues prevalent in our society,” she said.

Highlights of the show include a paper collage on plastic mannequin torsos which are bold, funky and vibrant.

Her works are full of forms of the torso using different mediums. “They resonate her style and all the tedious intricate detailing surrenders to perfection. Kanchan has been working on female toros for past two decades,” the organisers said.

Earlier, her works were based on torsos that were minimal, monumental and sparse with decorative and embellished motifs. Now she started incorporates painted flowers, sequins and Swarovskis on them.

They works are full of textured lines, built by layers upon layers of paint. Yet at the same time her mixed media torsos are embellished with sequins, Swarovskis, stickers, laces, wrapping paper and any found objects, which she is constantly on the lookout for at home, on streets and local bazaars.

“As she works, her thought process is more human and intuitive — ensuring that all art elements like composition, tonality, lines, colour, mediums and placements are summarised with precision,” the organisers said. (IANS)

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Scroll Paintings of West Bengal is integral component of India’s versatile Culture, have enough admirers to ensure survival

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Scroll Paintings , Wikimedia

New Delhi, May 5, 2017: Works of art and paintings have been an integral component of India’s versatile culture and a recent book attempts to capture minute details and important facets of the scroll paintings of Bengal. The author says that the art has enough admirers to ensure its survival.

“The future of Bengali pata paintings looks healthy to me. Even with the charm of electronic arts growing stronger by the day, people are drawn to patas, perhaps more today than 50 years ago,” the author, Mandakranta Bose, told IANS in an email interview.

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“Several cultural organisations and the West Bengal state government continue to nurture the production and marketing of patas and the patuas (scroll painters) themselves are skilled at presenting their work to the public, for instance, at the Calcutta Book Fair. The art of the pata may not be as popular as Bollywood movies but it has enough admirers to ensure its survival,” she added.

“The Ramayana in Bengali Folk Paintings” (Niyogi Books/Rs 795/130 Pages) attempts to explain how scroll paintings have become an inseparable part of storytelling, inculcated as a prerogative of the itinerant bard and the village artisans of all times.

Treated as “heritage” throughout Bengal, the paintings are drawn in colourful and vibrant style on “patas”, or scrolls, with vegetable colours and other indigenous dyes. Each scroll depicts one single incident or episode from the epic and the next set of narration follows the other, forming a narrative format that is much like a film roll or a comic strip.

“Some years ago in Medinipur district of West Bengal, while I was investigating more on the paintings, a ‘patua’ painter compared Rama to George Bush in his paintings. While Rama succeeded in bringing his warriors home, would Bush be able to do the same for his soldiers fighting in Iraq, was the question the painter tried to ask through his works,” Bose recalled.

The author said that it is in this way that the ‘patua’ painters make the past relevant to the present.

How are the Bengali scroll paintings different from the other scroll paintings?

Although painted scrolls are found in many diversified folk art traditions of India, Bengali scrolls stand out for their sustained and elaborate narrative treatment, built upon “focused plots and clear-cut characters” reflecting specific themes. In the context of the technique as well, the paintings can be distinguished by their gallant colours and bold lines, she said.

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The author of this well-researched book was first introduced to the patas of West Bengal at a friend’s home in Kolkata.

“Over the years, on my visits to Kolkata, I came across more and more of these paintings in the circles of my academic friends. I also found out that this art form was slowly gaining popularity amongst art collectors and academicians. The more I looked at these patas, the more I was drawn to them as much for their artistic form as for their narrative power,” she added. (IANS)