Wednesday December 11, 2019

WHO: Medicines Provided To Libya With Italian Govt’s Support

The World Health Organization (WHO) said that medicines have been provided to Libyan hospitals, with the support of the Italian government

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Libya, Italy, Who, Health, Medicines
Deliveries arrived today at Tripoli hospitals and clinics and were generously supported by the Italian government. VOA

The World Health Organization (WHO) said that medicines have been provided to Libyan hospitals, with the support of the Italian government.

“This week, the World Health Organization is providing medicines and supplies to treat thousands of patients across Libya,” WHO tweeted on Friday, Xinhua news agency reported.

“Deliveries arrived today at Tripoli hospitals and clinics and were generously supported by the Italian government,” the organization said.

Libya, Italy, Who, Health, Medicines
World Health Organization (WHO) said that medicines have been provided to Libyan hospitals. Wikimedia Commons

On Thursday, WHO said it provided essential medicines to Libyan hospitals, with the support of the German government and the US Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance.

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Due to years of armed conflicts and economic instability, Libyan authorities have been struggling to provide proper healthcare and education and other basic services for the people. (IANS)

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AI Can Better Help Doctors to Identify Cancer Cells in Human Body

The process of manually identifying all the cells in a pathology slide is extremely labor intensive and error-prone

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Cancer
The AI algorithm helps pathologists obtain the most accurate Cancer cell analysis - in a much faster way. Pixabay

Researchers at University of Texas Southwestern have developed a software tool that uses Artificial Intelligence (AI) to recognize Cancer cells from digital pathology images – giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes.

The spatial distribution of different types of cells can reveal a cancer’s growth pattern, its relationship with the surrounding microenvironment, and the body’s immune response.

But the process of manually identifying all the cells in a pathology slide is extremely labor intensive and error-prone.

“To make a diagnosis, pathologists usually only examine several ‘representative’ regions in detail, rather than the whole slide. However, some important details could be missed by this approach,” said Dr. Guanghua “Andy” Xiao, corresponding author of a study published in EbioMedicine.

A major technical challenge in systematically studying the tumor microenvironment is how to automatically classify different types of cells and quantify their spatial distributions.

The AI algorithm that Dr Xiao and his team developed, called “ConvPath”, overcomes these obstacles by using AI to classify cell types from lung cancer pathology images.

Cancer
Researchers at University of Texas Southwestern have developed a software tool that uses Artificial Intelligence (AI) to recognize Cancer Cells from digital pathology images – giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes. Pixabay

The ConvPath algorithm can “look” at cells and identify their types based on their appearance in the pathology images using an AI algorithm that learns from human pathologists.

The algorithm helps pathologists obtain the most accurate cancer cell analysis – in a much faster way.

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“It is time-consuming and difficult for pathologists to locate very small tumour regions in tissue images, so this could greatly reduce the time that pathologists need to spend on each image,” said Dr Xiao. (IANS)