Saturday December 14, 2019

WHO Warns More Than 40 Percent of Smokers Globally Die from Lung Diseases

The World Health Organization recommends a number of effective, low-cost measures countries can adopt to reduce tobacco consumption

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FILE - An anti-tobacco warning is seen on a road divider on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, Nov. 4, 2016. VOA

The World Health Organization warns that more than 40 percent of smokers globally die from lung diseases, such as cancer, chronic respiratory diseases and tuberculosis. The warning comes ahead of World No Tobacco Day this Friday, with the theme being, “Don’t let tobacco take your breath away.”

The World Health Organization says that every year, tobacco use kills at least eight million people. The U.N. agency reports 3.3 million users will die from lung-related diseases. This number includes people exposed to second-hand smoke, among them more than 60,000 children under age five who die of lower respiratory infections due to passive smoking.

Vinayak Prasad, the acting director of the WHO’s Department for the Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases, says the global economic cost of using tobacco is $1.4 trillion. This is due to health expenditures, loss of productivity from illness and other expenses resulting from smoking-related diseases. He says both lives and money could be saved if people stopped smoking.

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Cigarettes don’t contain just nicotine but a range of toxic, carcinogenic chemicals you wouldn’t want near your body. Pixabay

“What we see also is that if people who are smoking, almost 20 percent of the world is smoking, if they quit, some of the benefits actually come very quickly, especially the lung diseases. Within two weeks, the lung functions actually start to become normal,” he said.

The World Health Organization reports that globally, the prevalence of smoking has gone down from 27 percent in 2000 to 20 percent in 2016. But the WHO, notes that the number of tobacco users worldwide has remained stable at 1.1 billion because of population growth.

Kerstin Schotte, WHO technical officer in the same department as Prasad, notes a steeper decline in the prevalence of smoking in wealthier countries, compared to poorer ones.

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The World Health Organization recommends a number of effective, low-cost measures countries can adopt to reduce tobacco consumption. Pixabay

“And, some low-and-middle income countries even have increasing smoking prevalence rates. This is where the tobacco industry is going at the moment,” she said. “They know a little bit that it is a lost cause in Europe and North America, so they are going into the low-and-middle-income countries, targeting especially women and children there.”

ALSO READ: Over 60% E-cigarette Smokers Want to Quit: Study

The World Health Organization recommends a number of effective, low-cost measures countries can adopt to reduce tobacco consumption.

These include the creation of smoke-free environments, imposing a ban on all forms of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship. WHO also suggests putting a high tax on the sale of cigarettes and other tobacco products to make them unaffordable for many, especially young people. (VOA)

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Smoking and Stress Lead to Greying of Hair: Experts

Stress, smoking cause early greying of hair

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Too much of stress can increase ageing. Pixabay

With your first grey strand comes ageing, but it could also be a sign of too much stress, say experts.

“Premature greying can be a sign of excessive stress as it is one of the significant causes; under pressure, one constricts the blood vessels hampering the healthy flow of nutrients to the scalp resulting in hair fall and greying.

“Stress also reduces oxygen supply to the scalp as breathing, and is also one of the major causes of aging and premature greying, dull, and scanty hair,” Rajni Ohri, Founder, Ohria Ayurveda said.

Although ageing is natural, and should be accepted with grace, one cannot control the process of ageing and worrying about it will only further stress.

Mohit Narang, Skincare expert, AVON says that greying of hair can also happen due to smoking. “People who smoke regularly have higher chances of premature greying, as can a lack of nutrition. A diet deficient in vitamins and minerals can lead to early greying.”

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Along with stress, smoking can also cause greying of hair strands. Lifetime Stock

How to tackle the menace of premature greying of hair?

Ayurvedic hair oils are beneficial for slowing greying. If used regularly they delay greying even in old age. Ingredients that assist keeping the hair pigment intact are amla, onion seeds, bhringraj, henna, sesame, curry leaves.

Dried amla can be used to fight premature greying. Cut them into pieces and dry them in the sun; once dry, roast it in the pan and then mix with coconut oil. Apply the mixture on your hair overnight.

Apart from repairing natural hair color, onion juice also helps treat hair loss and thinning. For best results, mix onion juice with lemon juice. Apply the mixture evenly on the scalp and hair. Leave it on for 15- 25 minutes and then wash your hair with a mild shampoo. Make this your routine for at least two weeks.

Curry leaves darken your hair by restoring the natural melanin pigment so that hair becomes dark again. The leaves also help in preventing and treating as curry leaves are rich in Vitamin B and minerals like iodine, zinc and iron.

Also Read- Narcissism Declines as you Grow Older

Consume a nutritional diet rich in Vitamins B12, B9, Iron, Folic acid. Include amla, beetroot, green leafy vegetables and nuts like soaked almonds, anjeer, walnuts, and soaked sesame seeds.

Practice yoga for healthy blood flow to the scalp. Practice ‘Pranayam’ to keep the mind calm and relaxed.

Quit smoking, or at least reduce the instances of smoking. (IANS)