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Why Do People Around The World Consider English Essential?

Primary Language of the Internet is English

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Why Do People Around The World Consider English Essential?
Why Do People Around The World Consider English Essential? flickr

Learning English is considered to be vital in almost all the countries. People living in nations, whose first language is not English, definitely, make it a point to learn and study it as a second language, right from their childhood. In fact, many parents resort to hiring private English Tutors in order to give their kids the much needed extra edge in English to stay ahead in the competitive world. As globalization is rapidly making the world a small place to live in by forging an interconnection between, almost, every part of the world with each other, English has rapidly emerged as a common global language, virtually eliminating all international borders.

Following are some major points to help you understand the importance of learning English.

  • Primary Language of the Internet

We, definitely, go online, at least for some point in the day. A vast majority of the websites present on the Internet detail the needed information in the English language. Not only the websites, even all the major software packages, and operating systems, for your smart electronic devices including mobile, PC etc, use English as their primary language. Hence, it can be safely said that English is the primary language of the Internet and digital communication.

  • You Stand a Good Chance of Landing a Great Job

If you are looking to work in a multinational company or thinking of moving abroad; the prospects of getting a good job increase, if you can communicate well in English. Almost 54 countries of the world use English as their official language. Moreover, it is the official language of both NATO and UN.

  • Ability to Communicate with a Tremendous Amount of People

English holds the spot of being the second largest language in the world in terms of native speakers as well as persons who study, learn and communicate in English as their second language. Hence, if you are comfortable in English; it means you are convenient and comfy enough to communicate and interact with a huge amount of people in the world. Apart from this; even when it comes to using a common language in business; English comes on top in terms of usage and popularity.

some words of English language
some words of English language, pixabay
  • Quick & Simple to Learn

If you compare the English alphabets with other languages such as Spanish, Arabic or Mandarin, you will find English alphabets a lot easier to grasp. Hence, with proper efforts, you can learn English much quickly as compared to other languages.

  • Get Access to a Host of other Learning Opportunities

If you are looking to widen your knowledge base by taking up additional courses or programs; you will, undoubtedly, agree with the fact that majority of the universities and schools, worldwide, offer a plethora of study opportunities and courses which are taught and instructed, solely and entirely in English. So, in order to enjoy the benefits of studying different courses, you need to be well-versed in English.

Also read: Yogi accepts recommendations Hindi English teaching madrasas

Conclusion

Above were the major reasons indicating and highlighting the importance of learning the English language. Apart from these, numerous other reasons are available as well. Hence, right from befriending people internationally to following your career-oriented goals; you, undoubtedly, need the support of English language. (IANS)

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Volunteers in Colorado to Teach English to Immigrant Students

At the Intercambio Community Center in Longmont, Colorado, volunteer Deepa McCauley is teaching a dozen immigrants to talk about health in English

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The volunteer teachers and their students both say the meaningful conversations they have at their Intercambio classes build lasting community connections. Pixabay

It’s been said that to have another language is to possess a second soul. For immigrants to the U.S., that soul can be hard to get, because it’s often confusing and difficult to find English classes, and private lessons can be expensive.

In Colorado, an award-winning group called Intercambio trains volunteers to teach English as a second language to immigrant students from around the world. The lessons take place in classroom settings or in the immigrant’s home. In the process, volunteers and their “students” often become lasting friends, building meaningful connections and a deeper soul for the entire community.

At the Intercambio Community Center in Longmont, Colorado, volunteer Deepa McCauley is teaching a dozen immigrants to talk about health … in English.

“Running a fever doesn’t mean that you’re running,” she said. “Running a fever is the temperature. Yes, exactly. The thermometer moves.” The men and women in her class come from around the world.

McCauley teaches them English without speaking their native languages. She says it’s possible because the training materials are filled with helpful illustrations and because of the training she received from Intercambio. “I don’t have a teaching background, but Intercambio has great training classes,” she said.

Its own training materials

Intercambio’s Executive Director Lee Shainis says the group developed its training materials with the volunteers in mind.

“We found that a lot of the materials out there were not directly geared toward volunteer teachers, and we’ve had 5,000 volunteer teachers since we started, 18 years ago,” he said. “And volunteers are capable of doing an amazing job, but they also need something ready to go and also really practical and relevant.”

Back in the classroom, McCauley listens closely when her students speak up, looking for ways to make their conversations more meaningful and relevant. That includes a lesson in their textbooks about mental health.

McCauley reads from the textbook: “How’s he feeling?” she asks. “Depressed,” the class responds. But then a student from Peru takes a step away from the textbook lesson. She ventures to say that depression can come from discrimination.

english, volunteers, learn english
At the Intercambio Community Center in Longmont, Colorado, volunteer Deepa McCauley is teaching a dozen immigrants to talk about health in English. Pixabay

Rather than going back to the textbook right away, McCauley uses this moment to build a more meaningful connection for everyone. Students stop writing and look up and watch as McCauley responds:

“Yep. Depression can come from discrimination. My father, in India, he was an engineer. He came to America, he was collecting carts. In the grocery store. He was depressed.” “Changing life,” a woman from Peru says. “Big change in life,” McCauley responds.

Meaningful lessons, lasting difference

Intercambio’s Shainis says that making language lessons meaningful makes a lasting difference, thanks to volunteer teachers such as McCauley.

“Deepa is awesome. She was one of our many teachers who had zero experience as a volunteer teacher teaching English when she first came in, and we’ve seen huge advancements in her quality of teaching, in her quality of getting her students engaged.” The opportunity to help immigrants learn English in this way has a personal meaning for McCauley.

“One of the main reasons I wanted to teach English is because my parents were first generation immigrants who didn’t speak English, and they had a really hard time,” she said. “And they wouldn’t have had a hard time if they had a place like Intercambio.”

english, learn english, volunteers
Intercambio’s Shainis says that making language lessons meaningful makes a lasting difference, thanks to volunteer teachers such as McCauley. Pixabay

Back at the Intercambio classroom, there are many successes to celebrate, such as the advances of a student named Silvia, who came to the United States from Mexico.

ALSO READ: ‘Credible Threat’ Leads To Closing of Denver-Area Schools

“When I left my country, I didn’t speak at all English. At all,” Sylvia said. “Sylvia was one of my very first students,” McCauley said. “She’s been here for how many years now? Two years. Now she has a job. She’s working. So she’s doing really well.”

The volunteer teachers and their students both say the meaningful conversations they have at their Intercambio classes build lasting community connections. (VOA)