Saturday December 14, 2019
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Why do people quit their jobs?

The trend of quitting a job is taking a heavy toll on the young generation. The reason can vary from work-related, personal, family to some miscellaneous reasons.

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Quitting job is related to multiple factors. Wikimedia Commons
Quitting job is related to multiple factors. Wikimedia Commons
  • By Dr. Bharti Raizada, Chicago

Every now and then we come across someone who quit his job or is thinking to quit. I talked to some of these people and figured out that there are multiple contributing factors for this. Basically, these can be grouped as i) work-related, ii) personal or family related, and iii) miscellaneous reasons. They can play a role either alone or in combination.

Work-related Reasons:

1. Uncaring boss or bullying by boss or seniors leading to stress and negative thoughts.

2. Feeling of micromanagement and continuous supervision

3. Lack of or no promotions or financial increments.

4. Odd or long hours of work or different shifts leading to mental and physical exhaustion and disturbance of sleep cycle.

5. Biases/ discrimination, favoritism and corruption at the workplace.

6. No or little recognition or reward for hard and honest work.

7. Frequent hiring and firing at the workplace. This leads to a feeling of insecurity.

8. No challenges in the workplace. Under utilization of skills.

9. Low pay, wages, or bonus.

10. False promises by the employer.

11. Working in isolated chambers, strained relationship with co-workers or if the work environment is not optimal or congenial.

Also Read: Ten Tips On How To Boost Self-Confidence

12. Cultural isolation at the workplace. Feeling left out.

13. Forced to quit by the employer.

Striking balance between job and life is very important. Wikimedia Commons
Striking balance between job and life is very important. Wikimedia Commons

Personal Reasons:

1.Not able to keep up with latest technologies and advancements.

2. Health issues. Not able to keep appointments and take care of own health.

3.Long commute to work.

4. Not able to do housework.

5. No time for personal care, spiritual advancement, socialization, keeping up with hobbies.

6. Inability to attend social events, arrange vacations, or calling in sick.

7. Urge to work from home.

8. Personality factor. Not able to work with someone. Want to be the boss and desire to control. Want to quit because of arrogance or in a fit of rage.

9. Depression.

10. Inadequate skills to continue working and feeling that performance is not optimal and can lead to harm.

Also Read: How to Manage Your Time Smartly and Effectively?

Family Reasons:

1. Inability to take proper care of family members or spend time with them.

2. Sick family member.

3. Family in a different city, state, or country.

4. Pressure to quit from family, relatives, or friends

Most of the youngsters are becoming a victim of depression due to various factors. Wikimedia Commons
Most of the youngsters are becoming a victim of depression due to various factors. Wikimedia Commons

Miscellaneous Reasons:

1.Financial security is in place. The job is just a way to pass time.

2.Want to give an opportunity to younger people.

3.Greener Pasteur (opportunity to find a better life)

4. Afraid of lawsuits or legal actions.

5.The belief that they will get more money and work fewer hours in the new endeavour.

6. Anticipating getting fired.

7. Lured by other employers.

Dr. Raizada is a practicing anesthesiologist.

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Consuming Sugary Treats may Trigger Depression: Study

Shun sugary treats to avoid winter depression this X'mas

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Sugar Depression
You need to avoid eating sweets this season if you do not want to suffer from depression. Pixabay

Like any holiday season, you are once again surrounded by sugar plum pudding, chocolate cakes and sweet treats, but skipping those this time will help you ward off depressive illness especially if you are prone to depression, suggest researchers.

Eating added sugars — common in so many holiday foods — can trigger metabolic, inflammatory and neurobiological processes tied to depressive illness, said the study from a team of clinical psychologists at the University of Kansas published in the journal Medical Hypotheses.

Coupled with dwindling light in wintertime and corresponding changes in sleep patterns, high sugar consumption could result in a “perfect storm” that adversely affects mental health.

depression
Consuming sweets and sugary items can trigger depression. Lifetime stock

“For many people, reduced sunlight exposure during the winter will throw off circadian rhythms, disrupting healthy sleep and pushing five to 10 per cent of the population into a full-blown episode of clinical depression,” said Stephen Ilardi, associate professor of clinical psychology.

Ilardi, who co-authored the study with Daniel Reis (lead author), Michael Namekata, Erik Wing and Carina Fowler (now of Duke University), said these symptoms of “winter-onset depression” could prompt people to consume more sweets.

“One common characteristic of winter-onset depression is craving sugar,” he said.

Avoidance of added dietary sugar might be especially challenging because sugar offers an initial mood boost, leading some with depressive illness to seek its temporary emotional lift.

When we consume sweets, they act like a drug.

“They have an immediate mood-elevating effect, but in high doses they can also have a paradoxical, pernicious longer-term consequence of making mood worse, reducing well-being, elevating inflammation and causing weight gain,” said Ilardi.

The investigators reached their conclusions by analysing a wide range of research on the physiological and psychological effects of consuming added sugar.

Sweets depression
When we consume sweets, they act like a drug. Pixabay

It might be appropriate to view added sugar, at high enough levels, as physically and psychologically harmful, akin to drinking a little too much liquor.

“Alcohol is basically pure calories, pure energy, non-nutritive and super toxic at high doses. Sugars are very similar. We’re learning when it comes to depression, people who optimise their diet should provide all the nutrients the brain needs and mostly avoid these potential toxins,” Ilardi explained.

The researchers found inflammation is the most important physiological effect of dietary sugar related to mental health and depressive disorder.

“We know that inflammatory hormones can directly push the brain into a state of severe depression. So, an inflamed brain is typically a depressed brain. And added sugars have a pro-inflammatory effect on the body and brain,” said the researchers.

Our bodies host over 10 trillion microbes and many of them know how to hack into the brain.

“Many of those parasitic microbes thrive on added sugars, and they can produce chemicals that push the brain in a state of anxiety and stress and depression. They’re also highly inflammatory,a the team wrote.

Also Read- New AI can Reduce Risk of Suicide Among Youth

Ilardi recommended a minimally processed diet rich in plant-based foods and Omega-3 fatty acids for optimal psychological benefit.

As for sugar, observe caution not just during the holidays, but year-round. (IANS)