Monday December 18, 2017
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Why is Stephen Hawking trademarking his name?

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Famous British physicist, Stephen Hawking has applied to trademark his name at the Intellectual Property Office in order to stop people and businesses from exploiting his name with inappropriate products.

Currently, Stephen is Director of Research at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP) and Founder of the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology (CTC) at the University of  Cambridge.

Hawking has applied for two trademarks, the first one focuses on computer (software and hardware) and electronic equipment in general. While the other trademark is aimed at books and publications. Prof. Hawking aims to promote his name to support charities.

Professor Hawking is famous both in the scientific world and among lay people globally.

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Stephen Hawking believes Technology could end Poverty and Disease, says Artificial Intelligence could be the Worst or Best things for Humanity

Hawking said everyone has a role to play in making sure that this generation and the next are fully engaged with the study of science at an early level to create “a better world for the whole human race.”

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Stephen Hawking
Cosmologist Stephen Hawking delivers a video message during the inauguration of Web Summit, Europe's biggest tech conference, in Lisbon, Portugal, Nov. 6, 2017. (VOA)

Lisbon, November 7, 2017 : Technology can hopefully reverse some of the harm caused to the planet by industrialization and help end disease and poverty, but artificial intelligence (AI) needs to be controlled, physicist Stephen Hawking said on Monday.

Hawking, a British cosmologist who was diagnosed with motor neuron disease aged 21, said technology could transform every aspect of life but cautioned that artificial intelligence poses new challenges.

He said artificial intelligence and robots are already threatening millions of jobs — but this new revolution could be used to help society and for the good of the world such as alleviating poverty and disease.

“The rise of AI could be the worst or the best thing that has happened for humanity,” Stephen Hawking said via telepresence at opening night of the 2017 Web Summit in Lisbon that is attended by about 60,000 people.

“We simply need to be aware of the dangers, identify them, employ the best possible practice and management and prepare for its consequences well in advance.”

Hawking’s comments come during an escalating debate about the pro and cons of artificial intelligence, a term used to describe machines with a computer code that learns as it goes.

ALSO READ Humanity’s days are numbered, Artificial Intelligence (AI) will cause mass extinction, warns Stephen Hawking

Silicon Valley entrepreneur Elon Musk, who is chief executive of electric car maker Tesla Inc and rocket company SpaceX, has warned that AI is a threat to humankind’s existence.

But Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, in a rare interview recently, told the WSJ Magazine that there was nothing to panic about.

Stephen Hawking said everyone has a role to play in making sure that this generation and the next are fully engaged with the study of science at an early level to create “a better world for the whole human race.”

ALSO READ Indian Origin Scientist Part of the team that Developed Nanotechnology-based Test that quickly Detects Zika Virus

“We need to take learning beyond a theoretical discussion of how AI should be, and take action to make sure we plan for how it can be,” said Stephen Hawking, who communicates via a cheek muscle linked to a sensor and computerized voice system.

“You all have the potential to push the boundaries of what is accepted, or expected, and to think big. We stand on the threshold of a brave new world. It is an exciting — if precarious — place to be and you are the pioneers,” he said. (VOA)

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British-Indian Actor Kunal Nayyar Ranks Fourth on Forbes Magazines List of World’s Highest-Paid TV Actors

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Kunal Nayyar speaking at the 2017 San Diego Comic Con International, for "The Big Bang Theory", at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, California. Wikimedia

Los Angeles, Oct 1, 2017: British-Indian actor Kunal Nayyar ranks fourth on the Forbes magazines list of World’s Highest-Paid TV Actors 2017, which is led by his “The Big Bang Theory” co-star Jim Parsons.

Nayyar, who plays the role of Rajesh Koothrappali, an astrophysicist originally from New Delhi, India, in “The Big Bang Theory”, minted $25 million between June 1, 2016, and June 1, 2017, reports forbes.com.

Parsons retained the top position with collection of $27.5 million. According to reports, he earned $1 million per episode on the comedy show. The 44-year-old was ranked first in 2016 and 2015 also.

Another “The Big Bang Theory” actor Johnny Galecki occupied the second place with $26.5 million. Actor Simon Helberg raked in $26 million and took the third spot.

“NCIS: Naval Criminal Investigative Service” actor Mark Harmon rounds up the top five with $19 million while “Modern Family” actors Ty Burrell and Eric Stonestreet followed with $13.5 million and 12.5 million, respectively.

Actor Kevin Spacey was ranked eighth in the list with collections worth $12 million. He was joined by “Modern Family” actor Ed O’Neill, who also collected the same amount.

Jesse Tyler Ferguson came at the 10th spot with total income of $11 million. (IANS)

 

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11-year-old Indian-origin Arnav Sharma beats Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking in Mensa IQ test in UK

Wonder boy Arnav Sharma gained a score of 162 -- the maximum possible result you can achieve on the paper

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Arnav Sharma
Arnav Sharma, Wikimedia
  • Arnav Sharma, from Reading town in southern England, passed the infamously difficult Mensa IQ test a few weeks back with zero preparation
  • His mark in the exam, which primarily measures verbal reasoning ability, puts him in the top one per cent of the nation in terms of IQ level
  • The “genius benchmark” is set at 140 and Sharma gained a score of 162 — the maximum possible result you can achieve on the paper

London, July 1, 2017: An 11-year-old Indian-origin boy here has scored 162 in the prestigious Mensa IQ test, two points higher than geniuses Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking.

Arnav Sharma, from Reading town in southern England, passed the infamously difficult test a few weeks back with zero preparation. Mensa IQ test was developed in Britain to form an elite society of intelligent people, the Independent reported.

The “genius benchmark” is set at 140 and Sharma gained a score of 162 — the maximum possible result you can achieve on the paper.

His mark in the exam, which primarily measures verbal reasoning ability, puts him in the top one per cent of the nation in terms of IQ level.

ALSO READ: Sikh community in London helps deadly Grenfell Tower fire Survivors

“The Mensa test is quite hard and not many people pass it, so do not expect to pass,” Sharma told the daily.

Sharma said: “I had no preparation at all for the exam but I was not nervous. My family were surprised but they were also very happy when I told them about the result.”

The boy’s mother, Meesha Dhamija Sharma, said she kept her “fingers crossed” during his exam.

“I was thinking what is going to happen because you never know and he had never seen what a paper looks like,” she said.

Sharma said his hobbies are coding, badminton, piano, swimming and reading. He also has an unusually good geographical knowledge and can name all the capitals of the world.

A spokesperson for Mensa praised the 11-year-old boy, saying: “It is a high mark which only a small percentage of people in the country will achieve.”

Mensa was founded in 1946 in Oxford by Lancelot Lionel Ware, a scientist and lawyer, and Roland Berrill, an Australian barrister, but the organisation later spread around the world.

Its mission is to “identify and foster human intelligence for the benefit of humanity”. (IANS)