Thursday December 14, 2017

Why this Indian town once known as Manchester of the East sinking into oblivion

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By Rituparna Chakrobarty

Kanpur, a city once known as the Manchester of East, now fights hard for its own existence. All the cotton mills, the backbone of the city’s traditional economy, have been wiped out and the remaining  industries are in their last stages of survival.

But as every cloud has a silver lining, the city is now creating its new identity as a leather city along with the soap industries and hosiery industries blossoming within the city.

History of Kanpur

The city was founded by Raja Kanti Deo of Prayag in 1207 and was called Kohna. It was established on the banks of river Ganga over an area of 605km square. Later it was renamed Kanpur. The first mention of Kanpur was recorded in 1579 during the reign of Sher Shah Suri. By the time of 1801, the European businessmen realized the importance of the site and started establishing themselves there. Kanpur was one of the main centers of Industrial Revolution in India. It later became one of the most important military stations during the colonial rule. Presently it is the 5th largest city in country and counted as 7th largest city in the world.

 Manchester of East

Like Manchester in England, Kanpur spearheaded the Industrial Revolution in India with its cotton mills. Around 19th Century, Sir John Burney Alllens established a group of industries. National Textile Corporation (NTC) and British India Corporation  (BIC) by jointly combining nine textile industries viz: Swadeshi Cotton Mill, Allign Mill-I , Allign Mill-II, Kanpur textile, Meur Textile, Arthan Mill, Lal imli mill and Laxmi Ratan Cotton mill. As most of the raw material came from West Bengal and Surat, for easier accessibility the first tram facility was provided in the city. In the beginning of 20th Century, Lala Kamlapat laid the stone of JK cotton mills and JK Iron etc. The British added another feather in its crown by establishing a number of factories like: Hinduatan Aeronautics Limited, Indian ordnance factories.

Failure of the cotton mills

The condition of cotton mills started deteriorating after independence, as the Government of India did not show serious concern about the smooth running of the mills in Kanpur. Other than this, the internal politics of laborers doomed the functioning of the mills to a halt. The unavailability of funds, the communication gap between the laborers and management also led to the winding up of the mills. The machinery too was not upgraded with time.

Present Scenario

The privatization of industries is helping the city to gain its lost glory and to boost up its economy. Kanpur has emerged as one of the largest exporters of leather goods creating a new identity for itself. In order to further promote small scale industries, Uttar Pradesh state’s Industrial Development Corporation(UPSIDC) and Cooperative societies have come forward. Approximately 6500 small scale industries have been set up in the state. Public sector units are also outsourcing the machinery parts to the engineering sectors for their production; hence the engineering sector is also mushrooming in Kanpur.
Kanpur faces an economic fracture due to the lack of political unity. The absence of strong budget by the state or the central government is hampering the development of the city. Despite this, the people of Kanpur are rising above all odds and trying to develop their city with themselves, but without proper Government support, it’s still a dream which will take a very long time to materialize into reality.

  • Nice article…
    Its ironic DAT a city which was a cornerstone of Indian independence..
    Lost itself after achieving DAT…

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Manchester Bombings: 14th suspect apprehended, Bombing Investigation Continues

The bombing after a concert at the Manchester Arena on May 22 killed 22 people, some of them children. More than 60 people remain in hospital, with 23 in critical care.

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Salman Abedi, the man police say was behind the Manchester bombing, is seen in this image taken from CCTV on the night he committed the attack in this handout photo released to Reuters on May 27. RFA

Manchester, May 28, 2017: -British police investigating the deadly terror attack in Manchester say they have made another arrest as they continue their efforts to capture the suspected network of which they believe suicide bomber Salman Abedi had been a part.

Greater Manchester Police said in a statement on Twitter on May 28 that they had arrested a 25-year-old man “on suspicion of offenses contrary to the terrorism act.”

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The arrest brings the total number of suspects apprehended over the bombing to 14, including Abedi’s elder brother, Ismail. Two have since been released without charge, while 12 men remain in custody for questioning.

Asked during a BBC interview on May 28 whether some of the group members were still at large, Home Secretary Amber Rudd said: “Potentially. It is an ongoing operation.”

The bombing after a concert at the Manchester Arena on May 22 killed 22 people, some of them children. More than 60 people remain in hospital, with 23 in critical care.

Rudd said that intelligence agencies were monitoring 3,000 suspected extremists and had a wider pool of 20,000 people of interest.

Over the weekend, Prime Minister Theresa May announced the national terror threat level had been reduced from “critical” to “severe” and that military troops would stop patrolling Britain’s streets but that the public “should remain vigilant.”

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Extra armed officers will be on duty across the country with security stepped up at some 1,300 events over the long holiday weekend.

The Times newspaper reported on May 27 that some “23,000 jihadist extremists” living in Britain had been identified by intelligence officers. (RFA)

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No Indian Casualty in Monday’s Terror Attack in Manchester that killed 22 People

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Members of the Manchester Sikh Community attend a vigil in Albert Square, Manchester, England, May 23, 2017, the day after the suicide attack at an Ariana Grande concert that left 22 people dead as it ended on Monday night. VOA

New Delhi, May 23, 2017: There has been no report of any Indian casualty in Monday’s terror attack in Manchester that killed 22 people, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj said on Tuesday.

“So far there is no report of an Indian casualty in the #Manchester attack. We are keeping a close watch on the situation,” Sushma Swaraj tweeted.

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At least 22 people, including children, were killed and 59 injured when a male suicide bomber blew himself up at the end of a concert by American pop singer Ariana Grande at the Manchester Arena on Monday night.

President Pranab Mukherjee and Prime Minister Narendra Modi have joined world leaders in condemning the horrific attack. (IANS)

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India short of 500,000 Doctors, the Doctor-Patient ratio of 1:1,700 is worse than Vietnam

India is short of nearly 500,000 doctors, based on the World Health Organization (WHO) norm of 1:1,000 population, according to an IndiaSpend analysis of Government data.

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Image source: Wikimedia Commons

New Delhi, September 1, 2016: Needless to say that, Health-Management failure is prone in India. The depth of this fact can be measured only if we go through with these examples.

In Odisha, a man slung his wife’s body over his shoulder and carried it 10 km after being denied an ambulance on August 24, 2016.

In Kanpur, a man’s sick son died on his shoulder after being denied admission to a hospital on August 29, 2016.

Such cases become visible when they get social media and television attention, but millions cannot access India’s overburdened hospitals and inadequate medical facilities, a crisis illustrated by the fact that India is short of nearly 500,000 doctors, based on the World Health Organization(WHO) norm of 1:1,000 population, according to an IndiaSpend analysis of government data.

With more than 740,000 active doctors at the end of 2014 — a claimed doctor-patient population ratio of 1:1,674, worse than Vietnam, Algeria and Pakistan — the doctor shortage was one of the health-management failures cited by the report of a parliamentary committee on health and family welfare, which presented its findings on March 8, 2016.

Illegal capitation fees in private medical colleges, a health-services inequality between urban and rural India and a disconnect between the public-health and medical-education systems were among the issues the committee investigated while probing the Medical Council of India, the 82-year-old organisation responsible for medical-education standards.

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Up to 55 percent of India’s 55,000 doctors graduate every year from private colleges, many of which charge illegal donations, or “capitation fees”; in Tamil Nadu, it now costs a medical student from such a college Rs 2 crore to get an MBBS degree, the Times Of India reported on August 26, 2016.

The imbalances begin with access to medical education.

States with nearly half the population have only a fifth of MBBS seats

“Six states, which represent 31 percent of India’s population, have 58 per cent MBBS seats; on the other hand, eight states, which comprise 46 percent of India’s population, have only 21 per cent MBBS seats,” said an unnamed expert who deposed before the parliamentary committee.

These medical-education imbalances reflect larger public-healthcare issues. In general, poverty is correlated with the lack of healthcare. For instance, among states with the highest proportion of undernourished children, Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh have the worst infrastructure for institutional deliveries.

India’s poorer states have health indicators that are worse than many nations poorer than them, and India’s healthcare spending is the lowest among BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) nations, as are its health indicators.

Every year, 55,000 doctors complete their MBBS and 25,000 post-graduation nationwide, said another unnamed expert. At this rate of growth, he told the committee, India should have a doctor (allopathic) for every 1,250 people for a population of 1.3 billion by 2020, and one for every 1,075 by 2022 (population: 1.36 billion).

“However, the committee has been informed? that doctors cannot be produced overnight, and if we add 100 medical colleges every year for the next five years, only by the year 2029 will the country have an adequate number of doctors,” the second expert said.

The shortage of doctors, the report said, is despite the increase in medical colleges, from 23 in 1947 to 398 at the end of 2014. India, the report noted, has more medical colleges than any country, and 49,930 admissions were available in 2014.

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“An expert who appeared before the committee submitted that India was very very short of doctors and to meet this shortfall, India needs to have not four hundred, but one thousand medical colleges,” the report said.

The central government has approved 22 medical colleges with 1,765 seats in the last two years, according to an e-book published by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

The NITI Aayog, the government’s think-tank, has prepared the draft National Education Commission Bill, 2016, to reassess India’s healthcare and medical-education infrastructure.

While 11 new All IndiaInstitutes of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) have been added with 1,100 seats, the government has proposed an additional 4,700 MBBS seats.

As many as 5,540 MBBS seats and 1,004 PG seats have been added in the last two academic sessions, the e-book said.

Medical-education shortages manifest themselves in under-staffed public-health services nationwide: There is an 83 percent shortage of specialist medical professionals in community health centres (CHCs), as IndiaSpend reported in September 2015.

Public-health centres across India’s rural areas — 25,308 in 29 states and seven union territories — are short of more than 3,000 doctors, the scarcity rising 200 per cent (or tripling) over 10 years, IndiaSpend reported in February 2016.

The committee was, thus, sceptical of the government’s claims of the doctor-population ratio.

“Given the fact that the Indian Medical Register is not a live database and contains names of doctors who may have passed away or retired from active practice, by now, as well as those with a permanent address outside India and that there is no mechanism in place for filtering out such cases, the Committee is highly sceptical of the ministry’s claim of having one doctor per 1,674 population,” the parliamentary report said. “In view of the above, the Committee feels that the total universe of doctors in India is much smaller than the official figure, and we may have one doctor per 2,000 population, if not more.” (IANS)

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2 responses to “India short of 500,000 Doctors, the Doctor-Patient ratio of 1:1,700 is worse than Vietnam”

  1. There are more than enough doctors graduating from medical schools in the country but they seem to run to other countries to earn cash, rather than saving and treating patients in their own country.

    • That is because in Canada they can often go back to school one year plus take up junior position under a doctor here in a rural area for 2 more years . After the first year they are often sending $3,000 to $4,000 per month back to their family in India to cover debt to cover education . After being in Canada 3 years they can make many times what they would in India, It very frustrating to be in country short of ambulances and supplies for the bottom third.