Friday June 22, 2018

Men’s Risk of Developing Diabetes Can be Influenced by Wife’s BMI

Your wife's high body mass index (BMI) can increase your risk of developing Type-2 diabetes -- a condition that affects over 400 million people worldwide, a study has found.

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Check-up for Diabetes. Pixabay
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Your wife’s high body mass index (BMI) can increase your risk of developing Type-2 diabetes — a condition that affects over 400 million people worldwide, a study has found.

The findings showed that a man, whose wife had a BMI of 30 kg/m2, had a 21-per cent higher risk of developing diabetes than men whose wives had a BMI of 25 kg/m2 – regardless of the man’s own BMI.

However, the same was not found in women.

“If we adjusted for the women’s own weight, they did not have a heightened risk of developing Type-2 diabetes as a result of their husband’s BMI. But even when we adjusted for the weight in men, they had a heightened risk,” said lead author Jannie Nielsen, post-doctoral student at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Type 1 Diabetes
The risk of diabetes is also connected to dental health via glucose tolerance.

The researchers believe that it is so because women are largely in charge of the household and diets.

“We believe it is because women generally decide what we eat at home. That is, women have greater influence on their spouse’s dietary habits than men do,” Nielsen added, in a paper published in the journal Diabetologia.

For the study, the team examined data from 3,649 men and 3,478 women.

Based on the results, Nielsen believes that early detection of Type-2 diabetes can be improved if we change our approach to the disease.

Also Read: Irregular Periods Strongly Linked To Type 2 Diabetes In Girls

“Our approach to Type-2 diabetes should not focus on the individual, but instead on, for example, the entire household. If a woman has a heightened risk, there is a strong probability that it is shared by her husband,” Nielsen said. (IANS)

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Study: Plant-based Diets Can Help Diabetes Patients

According to the researchers, those with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than those who do not have diabetes

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Study: Plant-based Diets Can Help Diabetes Patients
Study: Plant-based Diets Can Help Diabetes Patients. Pixabay

Plant-based diets can be beneficial for diabetes as a new study has found that it may improve glycemic control, cholesterol and lead to weight loss in people with Type 2 diabetes.

The researchers suggest that plant-based diets benefit both glycemic control and cardiovascular health because they are low in saturated fat, rich in phytochemicals, high in fibre and often rich in low-glycemic fruits and vegetables.

“The link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease is strong. 60-70 per cent of people who have Type 2 diabetes die of heart disease,” said co-author Hana Kahleova, Director of Clinical Research at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington DC.

“The good news is that this study shows that the same simple prescription — eating a plant-based diet — can reduce our risk for heart problems and improve Type 2 diabetes at the same time,” Kahleova added.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

According to the researchers, those with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than those who do not have diabetes.

For the study, published in the journal Clinical Nutrition, the researchers reviewed nine randomised controlled trials — nearly 700 participants — that assessed the effectiveness of vegan and vegetarian diets for diabetes patients.

Also Read: Study: Diabetes Treatment Gets Boost From ‘Surgery in a Pill’

The results suggested that those who ate a plant-based diet lowered their cholesterol, lost weight, lowered HbA1c levels, and improved other cardiometabolic risk factors when compared to those who ate a non-vegetarian diet.

There was no significant effect on fasting insulin, HDL-C, triglycerides or blood pressure. The overall certainty of evidence was moderate but was low for fasting insulin, triglycerides, and waist circumference. (IANS)