Thursday August 22, 2019

Men’s Risk of Developing Diabetes Can be Influenced by Wife’s BMI

Your wife's high body mass index (BMI) can increase your risk of developing Type-2 diabetes -- a condition that affects over 400 million people worldwide, a study has found.

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check-up for diabetes
Check-up for Diabetes. Pixabay

Your wife’s high body mass index (BMI) can increase your risk of developing Type-2 diabetes — a condition that affects over 400 million people worldwide, a study has found.

The findings showed that a man, whose wife had a BMI of 30 kg/m2, had a 21-per cent higher risk of developing diabetes than men whose wives had a BMI of 25 kg/m2 – regardless of the man’s own BMI.

However, the same was not found in women.

“If we adjusted for the women’s own weight, they did not have a heightened risk of developing Type-2 diabetes as a result of their husband’s BMI. But even when we adjusted for the weight in men, they had a heightened risk,” said lead author Jannie Nielsen, post-doctoral student at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Type 1 Diabetes
The risk of diabetes is also connected to dental health via glucose tolerance.

The researchers believe that it is so because women are largely in charge of the household and diets.

“We believe it is because women generally decide what we eat at home. That is, women have greater influence on their spouse’s dietary habits than men do,” Nielsen added, in a paper published in the journal Diabetologia.

For the study, the team examined data from 3,649 men and 3,478 women.

Based on the results, Nielsen believes that early detection of Type-2 diabetes can be improved if we change our approach to the disease.

Also Read: Irregular Periods Strongly Linked To Type 2 Diabetes In Girls

“Our approach to Type-2 diabetes should not focus on the individual, but instead on, for example, the entire household. If a woman has a heightened risk, there is a strong probability that it is shared by her husband,” Nielsen said. (IANS)

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Early Onset of Menstruation Associated with Higher Risk of Diabetes

This new study, analysing more than 15,000 postmenopausal women in China, has found that women who begin menstruating at an earlier age have a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes

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Diabetes

Early onset of menstruation is associated with a higher risk of Type-2 diabetes, but body mass index (BMI) may mediate this link, says a study.

Each year of delay in menarche age correlated with a six per cent lower risk of Type-2 diabetes, said the study published in the journal Menopause.

“Earlier onset of menses (14 y) was associated with diabetes in later life, likely driven by adult BMI (body mass index),” said Stephanie Faubion, Medical Director, North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

“Other factors such as nutrition and BMI in childhood may also play a role in this association,” Faubion added.

diabetes
Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women and claims 2.1 million female lives every year, more so than men. Pixabay

Type-2 diabetes mellitus has become one of the most common diseases worldwide. In 2015, it affected nearly 8.8 per cent of people aged 20 to 79 globally, and by 2040, it is expected to affect 10.4 per cent.

With so many people affected, it is not surprising how much research has been devoted to identifying determinants of the disease in order to prevent its development. Various lifestyle and environmental factors have already been confirmed, but there is also growing evidence pointing to some physiologic factors.

Also Read: Acer Brings its 8 New Gaming Laptops in India

This new study, analysing more than 15,000 postmenopausal women in China, has found that women who begin menstruating at an earlier age have a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes. (IANS)