Tuesday July 23, 2019
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Re-Wilding : Win or loss

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https://youtu.be/vfgDKOn84r4

Something extraordinary is happening at the Pleistocene Park in Siberia.

For the first time in ten thousand years – Wild horses, oxen and reindeers are returning to their new abode. The initiative is taken by the Russian scientist Sergei Zima who is creating an ecosystem from the Ice-Age through the process called Re-Wilding.

Zima says that these animals will eventually break the bushes and devour them and thus will fertilize the soil, which will make the grass grow and the trees to dry up. The result will be a creation of new meadowlands with steep vegetation.

Still the goal is far away as the presently the park is supporting only a meager number of 200 animals.

On the flip side of it, David Nogez of University of Copenhagen warns about the consequences of the Re-wilding methodologies. He mentions that to fully grasp the way in which the system works, one will have to consider the effect it will have when introducing the species to a new environment and also to keep in mind the alternatives such as the classic conservation approaches.

For instance, one can take the examples of the recovery of the wolf population in the USA’s Yellowstone National Park, which can very well be considered as a Re-Wilding success story. They were first introduced in the mid 1990s from where they have increased up to fivefold of their numbers.

The wolves are monitored closely in the park, but their spread off in the adjacent areas has created a rivalry with the ranchers.

One of the Ranchers, Richard Kinki, tells us they are helpless against taking any action towards the wolves as they are federally protected. The main problem lies in the fact that the cattle loss has increased with their population.

According to a study at the University of Copenhagen, the report argues that the decision makers should consider more of the wildlife and environmental sciences while implementing their laws of the Re-wilding program.

The video is brought to you by NewsGram in collaboration with Voice of America.

 

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To Mock Elon Musk, Russia Launched a Toy Car into Space

Rogozin is known for his rivalry with Musk which often comes out publicly as sarcastic banters

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Musk, Neuralink, Brain
Not many people know that Tesla Founder and CEO Elon Musk owns a startup called Neuralink that is developing ultra-high bandwidth brain-machine interfaces. Pixabay

Mocking SpaceX CEO Elon Musk launched a Tesla car into space in 2018, Russian scientists sent their own red car outside the Earth, but the car was actually just a toy.

In February 2018, SpaceX launched its reusable heavy-lift launch vehicle — Falcon Heavy for the first time along with a cherry-red Tesla Roadster with a mannequin called ‘Starman’ behind the wheel.

In response to Musk’s space stunt, the team from Russia’s Tomsk State University launched a toy replica of the red Zhiguli car owned by Dmitry Rogozin, who serves as the Director General of Russia’s Roscosmos space agency, Futurism reported on Friday.

Rogozin is known for his rivalry with Musk which often comes out publicly as sarcastic banters on micro-blogging site Twitter.

Elon Musk, Russia, Toy
Mocking SpaceX CEO Elon Musk launched a Tesla car into space in 2018. Pixabay

Along with the toy car, the Russian scientists also put a tiny cut-out of a smiling Rogozin in the driver’s seat.

Unlike ‘Starman’, however, the Rogozin replica returned to the Earth and landed an estimated 2,000 kilometres away from its launch site after about 16 hours of flight, the report said.

Russia’s space mockery targeting Musk was executed just days after Rogozin said he would not hire Musk to get help with reusable rocketry.

While Rogozin has not met Musk as yet, he frequently reacts publicly to the SpaceX CEO’s tweets and slams SpaceX over ‘killing competitors’.

Also Read- Amazon is Being Sued for Recording Children’s Voices with Alexa

Rogozin said he would gladly meet the multi-billionaire if he ever comes to Russia for a private visit. (IANS)