Saturday August 18, 2018

Will Indian theatre find relevance beyond Ramlila?

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Theatre

By Ishan Kukreti

Theater as an art form has been there since the early days of civilizations. From ancient Greek and Roman classical theatre to the postmodernist Theater of the Absurd, the stage has remained a constant for centuries-exploring, opining, criticizing.

‘We no longer have the strength to try and glimpse what lies beyond the walls we create to protect ourselves. And that’s exactly why theater should exist and where it should seek its strength. To peek inside where looking is forbidden.’ Polish director Krzysztof Warlikowski said in this year’s World Theatre Day (WTD) International Message.

WTD is celebrated all over the world by the theatre communities on March 27 to commemorate the art. It was started by International Theatre Institute in 1961.

Indian theatre is one of the first in the world to emerge. It has its presence all across the country in some form or the other. Metros have a brimming culture of theatre and an enthusiastic audience. But, apart from the ten odd days of Ramlila, there is not a lot of theatre in the smaller towns and cities. The introduction of cinema halls into the picture has also resulted in divergence of theatre audience to films. Yet cinema can never match the interactive quality of theatre.

‘Theatre will always remain relevant as the things one can say through a play sometimes cannot be said through cinema. It is a process which is very evolved and the way theatre helps actors achieve catharsis along with the audience is something that is absolutely magical.’ said Shilpa Shukla, critically acclaimed Indian actress.

Theatre, apart from being a powerful tool of communication is also a very good activity for personality development. Although a lot of people joining theatre enter it with an intention of using it as a medium to get into films, theatre’s relevance goes beyond being a trampoline.

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President Ram Nath Kovind Pays His Condolences to Former UN Chief Kofi Annan

Annan was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize jointly with the UN in 2001 "for their work for a better organised and more peaceful world".

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India condoles former UN chief Kofi Annan's death.
India condoles former UN chief Kofi Annan's death. Flickr

India on Saturday condoled the death of former UN Secretary General and Nobel laureate Kofi Annan with President Ram Nath Kovind expressing his condolences to the former Ghanaian diplomat’s family and the UN community as a whole.

“Sorry to learn of the passing of former Secretary General of the United Nations Kofi Annan,” Kovind said on the Rashtrapati Bhavan Twitter handle.

“My condolences to his family and to the UN community,” he stated.

Annan, 80, died on Saturday in Switzerland after a short illness, with his wife and three children by his side.

“It is with immense sadness that the Annan family and the Kofi Annan Foundation announce that the former Secretary General of the UN and Nobel Peace Laureate, passed away peacefully on Saturday 18th August after a short illness,” his family said.

Kofi Annan
Annan was the first black African to take up the role of the world’s top diplomat, serving two terms from 1997 to 2006. Flickr

Annan was the first black African to take up the role of the world’s top diplomat, serving two terms from 1997 to 2006. He later served as the UN special envoy for Syria, leading efforts to find a peaceful solution to the conflict.

He also led a UN commission to investigate the Rohingya refugee crisis in Myanmar.

The Myanmar government led by Aung San Suu Kyi supported Annan’s recommendations on the crisis in the country’s Rakhine State.

Also Read: New AI Model to Identify the Risk of Heart Disease in Indians

Annan was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize jointly with the UN in 2001 “for their work for a better organised and more peaceful world”.

His tenure as the UN chief coincided with the Iraq war and the HIV/Aids pandemic. (IANS)

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