Wednesday March 27, 2019

Will You Adopt New Technologies in Future? Ask Your Health

Health would also not predict wealth as effectively as it does overall adoption and future readiness

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AI scenarios present ethical issues ranging from privacy, human rights, employment or other social issues.
The AI-based system named "Philyra" can learn about perfume formulas, raw materials, historical success data and industry trends. Pixabay

Your health will play a key role in determining whether you would adopt as well as adapt to advanced technologies like Artificial Inteliegence (AI) and gene editing, an expert has emphasised.

“The healthier a person, he or she will be more likely to be open to the new beneficial thing than the less healthy person. And that openness dials up future readiness very severely,” said James L. McQuivey, Vice President, Principal Analyst, at global research firm Forrester, in a blog post on Friday.

Openness to risk resides in the body, which then shapes the mind.

“Looking ahead to the innovations coming, this means that healthier people are more likely to benefit from everything coming down the innovation pike than those who are less healthy,” McQuivey added.

According to him, physical health may influence emotional health, which would lead to intellectual agility, openness to innovation and finally to technology adoption.

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Health would also not predict wealth as effectively as it does overall adoption and future readiness. Pixabay

“The product implications of this are huge, but so are the social ones, because many of the innovations about to occur will involve health and wellness.

“This will make health the new digital divide: Those who have it will use technology to have more of it; those who don’t won’t,” the expert said.

However, physical health will not predict whether someone is a fashionista (that’s driven by social and personality needs, which are influenced by health but not always in one direction) nor will it predict timing of adoption, because in the end, you have to have money to buy a Tesla.

Also Read: Plant-Based Food May Boost Your Heart Health

Health would also not predict wealth as effectively as it does overall adoption and future readiness.

“But the point is the healthier you are, the more likely you are to be ready for the future – from AI to gene editing,” McQuivey noted, saying that “the future manager will only want to hire the healthiest people. And the future marketer will want the healthiest customers!” (IANS)

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13 Million in Congo Suffer from ‘Hunger’ and ‘Malnutrition’: UN

U.N. is appealing for $1.65 billion in humanitarian aid for the country this year - more than double the $700 million plus that it raised last year to help 8.5 million people

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FILE - A Congolese boy has his arm measured for malnutrition in a clinic run by medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres in the remote town of Dubie in Congo's southeastern Katanga province, March 18, 2006. VOA

The number of people needing humanitarian aid in Congo has increased dramatically in the past year to 13 million and “hunger and malnutrition have reached the highest level on record,” the head of the U.N. children’s agency said Monday.

UNICEF’s Executive Director Henrietta Fore told a news conference that 7.5 million of those needing aid are children, including 4 million suffering from acute malnutrition and over 1.4 million from severe acute malnutrition “which means that they are in imminent risk of death.”

U.N. humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock, who just returned from a visit to Congo with Fore, said the U.N. is appealing for $1.65 billion in humanitarian aid for the country this year – more than double the $700 million plus that it raised last year to help 8.5 million people.

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U.N. is appealing for $1.65 billion in humanitarian aid for the country this year. Pixabay

He said the worsening humanitarian situation is the result of economic stresses including volatility in commodity prices and the turbulent political situation surrounding December’s elections, compounded by violence, increased displacement and the world’s second-largest Ebola outbreak. Fore added that farmers fleeing with their families and drought in some areas also contributed.

She said the difficulty is that last year’s U.N. appeal was only half funded, and if that same amount is contributed this year it will only be a quarter of this year’s appeal, “and the needs are immense.”

Fore cited more grim statistics: 2 million people were newly displaced last year; 7.3 million children are out of school; 300,000 children die each year before their fifth birthday; 3 in 10 women are reported to be victims of sexual violence; and in January alone there were 7,000 cases of measles and 3,500 cases of cholera.

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UNICEF and its partners are providing psycho-social support, food and material assistance to the children, she said. Pixabay

Congo’s Health Ministry said Monday that the Ebola epidemic has now exceeded 1,000 cases, with a death toll of 629.

Fore said about 30 percent of the cases are children, and UNICEF has identified about 1,000 children who have been orphaned or left unaccompanied while their parents are isolated in Ebola treatment wards.

UNICEF and its partners are providing psycho-social support, food and material assistance to the children, she said.

In the major city of Bunia close to the epidemic’s center, Fore said U.N. and Red Cross officials visited a kindergarten where Ebola survivors who cannot get the virus were caring for orphaned and unaccompanied children.

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Congo’s Health Ministry said Monday that the Ebola epidemic has now exceeded 1,000 cases, with a death toll of 629. Pixabay

The U.N. officials also visited Goma, Beni and Butembo and the capital Kinshasa where Lowcock said they had “extremely constructive talks” with Congo’s new president, Felix Tshisekedi.

ALSO READ: Military-Backed Party in Lead in Thailand’s Election

“We were encouraged by the new president” who said he would like to work closely with the U.N. on humanitarian issues and problems related to the millions of displaced people, the undersecretary-general for humanitarian affairs said.

“Congo is a country where progress is possible,” Lowcock said, pointing to lower infant mortality, more children in school and Kinshasa becoming a modern African capital. (VOA)