Thursday August 16, 2018

Will You Adopt New Technologies in Future? Ask Your Health

Health would also not predict wealth as effectively as it does overall adoption and future readiness

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AI scenarios present ethical issues ranging from privacy, human rights, employment or other social issues.
AI scenarios present ethical issues ranging from privacy, human rights, employment or other social issues. Pixabay
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Your health will play a key role in determining whether you would adopt as well as adapt to advanced technologies like Artificial Inteliegence (AI) and gene editing, an expert has emphasised.

“The healthier a person, he or she will be more likely to be open to the new beneficial thing than the less healthy person. And that openness dials up future readiness very severely,” said James L. McQuivey, Vice President, Principal Analyst, at global research firm Forrester, in a blog post on Friday.

Openness to risk resides in the body, which then shapes the mind.

“Looking ahead to the innovations coming, this means that healthier people are more likely to benefit from everything coming down the innovation pike than those who are less healthy,” McQuivey added.

According to him, physical health may influence emotional health, which would lead to intellectual agility, openness to innovation and finally to technology adoption.

health
Health would also not predict wealth as effectively as it does overall adoption and future readiness. Pixabay

“The product implications of this are huge, but so are the social ones, because many of the innovations about to occur will involve health and wellness.

“This will make health the new digital divide: Those who have it will use technology to have more of it; those who don’t won’t,” the expert said.

However, physical health will not predict whether someone is a fashionista (that’s driven by social and personality needs, which are influenced by health but not always in one direction) nor will it predict timing of adoption, because in the end, you have to have money to buy a Tesla.

Also Read: Plant-Based Food May Boost Your Heart Health

Health would also not predict wealth as effectively as it does overall adoption and future readiness.

“But the point is the healthier you are, the more likely you are to be ready for the future – from AI to gene editing,” McQuivey noted, saying that “the future manager will only want to hire the healthiest people. And the future marketer will want the healthiest customers!” (IANS)

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Marital Spats May Deteriorate Your Health

Significant link between hostility and the biomarker LBP, which indicates the presence of bacteria in the blood. And there was a strong link between that biomarker and evidence of inflammation.

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How marital spats can affect your health. Pixabay

Couples, please take note. Fighting with your spouse may deteriorate your health, a new study has found.

The findings suggest that married people who fight are more likely to suffer from leaky guts — a problem that unleashes bacteria into the blood and can drive up disease-causing inflammation.

“We think that this everyday marital distress — at least for some people — is causing changes in the gut that lead to inflammation and, potentially, illness,” said lead author Janice Kiecolt-Glaser from the Ohio State University.

For the study published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology, the team recruited around 50 healthy married couples, surveyed them about their relationships and then encouraged them to discuss and try to resolve a conflict likely to provoke strong disagreement.

The researchers left the couples alone for these discussions, videotaped the 20-minute interactions and later watched how they fought.

Couples have tough time understanding soft negative emotions like sadness, loneliness of each other: Study.
Couples have tough time understanding soft negative emotions .

They categorised their verbal and non-verbal fighting behaviours, with special interest in hostility — things such as dramatic eye rolls or criticism of one’s partner.

The researchers also compared blood drawn pre-fight to blood drawn post-fight.

Men and women who demonstrated more hostile behaviours during the observed discussions had higher levels of one biomarker for leaky gut — LPS-binding protein — than their mellower peers, the researchers said.

Evidence of leaky gut was even greater in study participants who had particularly hostile interactions with their spouses and a history of depression or another mood disorder, they added.

Also Read: Reduce Loneliness and Boost Your Mental Health With Cycling

The study found a strong, significant link between hostility and the biomarker LBP, which indicates the presence of bacteria in the blood. And there was a strong link between that biomarker and evidence of inflammation.

Lifestyle changes that could contribute to decreased risk of gut-related inflammation include diets high in lean proteins, healthful fats, fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Probiotics might also be useful, Kiecolt-Glaser noted. (IANS)