Wednesday February 26, 2020

40-Year-Old Woman Suffering from Breast Cancer Delivers Baby through IVF Method

However, before starting the treatment for cancer Radhika had her ovaries frozen, said Dr Mandavi Rai, IVF expert at Indira IVF Hospital, here, who treated her

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IVF method
Terming it a unique case, doctors said delivering a baby by cancer patients post chemotherapy gets tougher with the age. Pixabay

A 40-year-old woman suffering from breast cancer for over five years has delivered a boy through in vitro fertilization (IVF) method. The patient Radhika (name changed) was diagnosed with breast cancer with cancerous changes without any metastasis, seven years ago and was undergoing treatment. She had been married for 17 years and decided to go for artificial reproductive techniques to enjoy motherhood.

The couple underwent a series of tests. The reports revealed normal semen analysis, but she had a poor ovarian reserve due to repeated chemotherapy cycles and cancer medications. However, before starting the treatment for cancer Radhika had her ovaries frozen, said Dr Mandavi Rai, IVF expert at Indira IVF Hospital, here, who treated her.

“Moreover with a endometrium (the mucous membrane lining the uterus) of 5.2 mm thickness against the normal 7-12 mm thickness it was impossible for Radhika to conceive. Such complications are crucial for patients and it’s the most difficult aspects of IVF procedure. Multiple procedures, including platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRP) to thicken her endometrium before the actual IVF procedure were performed. Her decision to get her eggs frozen before starting the cancer treatment helped,” said Dr Rai.

According to doctors, PRP therapy is proving to be a boon for such patients. The therapy involves extracting platelets through the centrifugation process from the patient’s blood. The therapy also improves the body’s resistance. The patient underwent three PRP therapy sessions with 3-5 ml of platelet-rich plasma injected at regular intervals. Significant growth was observed after each session. The thickness of endometrium at the end of 14-day therapy was found to be 8.2 mm, which is enough to conceive and healthy implantation of the embryo through IVF technique.

IVF method
However, before starting the treatment for cancer Radhika had her ovaries frozen, said Dr Mandavi Rai, IVF expert at Indira IVF Hospital, here, who treated her. Pixabay

For Radhika, once the once the endometrium lining reached 8.2 mm progesterone was started with the help of her frozen eggs and her husband’s sperms leading to formation of embryos, which were cultured until two blastocysts were transferred. After four weeks, an ultrasound confirmed intrauterine gestational sac with cardiac activity. “High-risk obstetric care was provided throughout the treatment. The patient underwent elective caesarean and delivered a boy, weighing 3 kg with no abnormalities,” said Dr Mandavi.

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Terming it a unique case, doctors said delivering a baby by cancer patients post chemotherapy gets tougher with the age. “Cryo-preservation and PRP techniques are gaining popularity among Indians. Several working women, especially in their early 30’s, have started opting for egg freezing,” said Dr Sagarika Aggarwal, a Delhi-based gynaecologist.

“Hemotherapy, which is treatment involving the administration of fresh blood, a blood fraction, or a blood preparation, in most cases acts as a big challenge for IVF treatment as chemotherapeutic drugs deplete the quantity as well as quality of eggs. Conceiving after cancer treatment through IVF is rare and the success rate is very low,” said Dr Nupur Gupta, gynaecologist, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon. (IANS)

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Here’s How Dairy Milk Consumption Can Lead to Breast Cancer

Dairy milk intake may up breast cancer risk

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Dairy milk cancer
Moderate amounts of dairy milk consumption can increase women's risk of breast cancer -- up to 80 per cent depending on the amount consumed. Pixabay

Researchers have found that even relatively moderate amounts of dairy milk consumption can increase women’s risk of breast cancer — up to 80 per cent depending on the amount consumed.

“Fairly strong evidence that either dairy milk or some other factor closely related to drinking dairy milk is a cause of breast cancer in women,” said study first author Gary E. Fraser from Loma Linda University in the US. “Consuming as little as 1/4 to 1/3 cup of dairy milk per day was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer of 30 per cent,” Fraser said.

By drinking up to one cup per day, the associated risk went up to 50 per cent, and for those drinking two to three cups per day, the risk increased further to 70 per cent to 80 per cent, the researchers said. For the findings, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, dietary intakes of nearly 53,000 North American women were evaluated for the study, all of whom were initially free of cancer and were followed for nearly eight years.

Dietary intakes were estimated from food frequency questionnaires (FFQ), also repeated 24 hour recalls, and a baseline questionnaire had questions about demographics, family history of breast cancer, physical activity, alcohol consumption, hormonal and other medication use, breast cancer screening, and reproductive and gynecological history.

Dairy milk
Consuming as little as 1/4 to 1/3 cup of dairy milk per day was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer of 30 per cent. Pixabay

By the end of the study period, there were 1,057 new breast cancer cases during follow-up. No clear associations were found between soy products and breast cancer, independent of dairy. But, when compared to low or no milk consumption, higher intakes of dairy calories and dairy milk were associated with greater risk of breast cancer, independent of soy intake, the study said.

The researchers noted that the results had minimal variation when comparing intake of full fat versus reduced or nonfat milks; there were no important associations noted with cheese and yogurt.

“However,” he said, “dairy foods, especially milk, were associated with increased risk, and the data predicted a marked reduction in risk associated with substituting soymilk for dairy milk.”

According to the researchers, possible reasons for these associations between breast cancer and dairy milk may be the sex hormone content of dairy milk, as the cows are of course lactating, and often about 75 per cent of the dairy herd is pregnant. Breast cancer in women is a hormone-responsive cancer.

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Further, intake of dairy and other animal proteins in some reports is also associated with higher blood levels of a hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), which is thought to promote certain cancers. “Dairy does have some positive nutritional qualities, but these need to be balanced against other possible, less helpful effects,” Fraser concluded. (IANS)