Wednesday December 13, 2017
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Womanly Advice for Female Solo Travelers to Ensure Personal Safety

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Female solo travelers
Female solo travelers . Pixabay

Oct 1, 2017: One must explore the unexplored areas and conquer the fear of traveling alone. It is often said that traveling is not for women. Nevertheless, the prevailing trend tells that the women solo travelers are breaking the glass ceiling by traveling alone boldly.

Here are some points listed down by Jai Dhar Gupta, CEO at MACE India and Nirvana Being, and Reecha Upadhyay, an advocate of human rights policy that may help female solo travelers :

1. Plan your trip well in advance and book your accommodation promptly

2. Beware of strangers! Talk to different people and make friends, but never tell anyone where you are staying and other personal information

3. Keep all your travel related documents safe. Take photographs of your documents and save them in your phone, in case you misplace the original.

4. Do not give people around you the impression that you are traveling alone. Roam confidently without giving anyone a suspicion

Also Read: 9 Beautiful Countries Where Indians Can Travel Without Visa

5. Personal safety is always paramount, and hence women must carry defense mechanism with themselves, for example, a pepper spray or personal safety alarms.

6. Keep your money at different and unexpected places rather than keeping all your money in one place

7. Solo travelers must try to blend in the with the culture of the destination. Do not try to gage the attention by wearing scant clothes or talking strangely. Respect their cultures and seek to maintain the decorum.

8. You must never leave home unprepared. Always do your homework before visiting a place. Try to gain as much information as you can about the place.

9. Learn to say no to people. Always trust your instincts, if you do not get positive vibes from anyone, then don’t go with them. Prevention is better than cure, so always maintain distance from such people.

Prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94

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Are you Traveling in Monsoon? Follow these Tips to look Stylish!

If you are planning for traveling in this rainy season here are some tips to get ready and style yourself

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Monsoon style
Traveling in monsoon season.Follow these Tips to look Stylish. Pixabay

New Delhi, August 13, 2017: 

“Experience is not What happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you.” – Aldous Huxley

Everyone loves to travel during monsoon, but looking stylish and maintaining comfort in the rainy season remains a major concern for most of them.

Traveling in this season can make your best ever memories for your entire life. As you can bask in the fascinating sunlight or enjoy the cold and calm darkness of the monsoon. Also, touch and feel the verdant greenery that is spread everywhere and vibrant culture of the places that come alive during the monsoons.

There is no denying that monsoon makes the process of packing one’s bag much more complex but don’t worry, here with some easy and quirky tips that will ease your concerns and let you enjoy the tour-


MEN

  • Pack more linen clothes

Men always search for something comfortable so you can definitely try linen plain shirts or T-shirts and there is nothing more relaxing than this even you can also team them up with denim printed jackets.

T-shirt
Man in T-shirt. Pixabay
  • Carry shorts, capris

Shorts and capris are so attractive and easy to wear, easy to carry and also look fantastic.

Capris
Man wearing shorts. Pixabay

 ALSO READ: Here are 4 Ways to Carefree, Happy Feet in Monsoon!

  • Go out with lightweight waterproof bag

Just carry a lightweight waterproof luggage bag with all your belonging in it, especially a plastic bag for your cell-phone assets.

Lightweight bag
Lightweight bag. Pixabay
  • Monsoon accessories for safety and style

Monsoon accessories such as hat looks funky and stylish and also protect your hair from sun, dust, and pollution. A waterproof wrist watch makes look you stunning, use a sunglass to protect your eyes. Team it up with a scarf and make a style statement of your own.

Monsoon accessories
Monsoon accessories. Pixabay

 


WOMEN

 

  • Carry light weighted colorful fabrics
colorful fabrics
A woman donning colorful fabrics. Pixabay

Women can try refreshing light fabrics, like cotton, chiffon, silk that dries out quickly. Your clothes must be bright colored such as, yellow, orange, pink, red, blue and some context of mixtures like fluorescent and magnified colors will enhance your style.

  • Palazzos let you feel comfortable

Two bottoms (shorts, palazzos) will offer utmost comfort, also keep one stretchable denim pant. This funky look will definitely win hearts wherever you go.

Denim
Girl wearing stretchable denim. Pixabay
  • Must carry a long sleeved top

Sum up your clothing with minimum outfits and carry one long sleeve that will protect your skin from tanning and mosquitos. One sleeveless top, a crop top for shorts- will give you bold look and colorful jackets that are reversible.

Monsoon style
Girl donning full sleeve top. Pixabay
  • Accessories add to your style

Accessories like a jelly umbrella, comfortable footwears (avoid flat and shoe), belt, scarves, sunglasses, and junk jewelry will add to your style and will surely turn heads wherever you go.

scarves, sunglasses,
Girl wearing scarves and Sunglass. Pixabay

 

 

– by Nidhi Singh of NewsGram. Twitter @NidhiSuryavansi

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A Sunrise Trek of Mount Batur in Bali

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I miss mountains. I miss hikes and fresh air and the thrill (and chill) of high places. So when I realised I had a long weekend ahead of me at the beginning of March I decided to do something about it.

Bali is only a 40-minute flight away from Surabaya so I resolved to do a sunrise trek among Bali’s volcanoes in order to sooth my soul.

Gunung Batur is 1717m, one of the several volcanic cones in what seems like a giant dish with water in its bottom. It was formed in an eruption in 1917 and has been active as recently as 1994. There are lots of tours there so once I’d arrived at my lovely hotel in Ubud (The Saren Indah, highly recommended for a relaxing break), I asked them to sign me up (I’m getting lazy in my travel habits out here), and then relaxed for the rest of the day, in preparation for my efforts.

The pick-up was 2 am. I’d indulged in lovely Balinese cuisine and a glass of wine before going to bed early, managing about four hours of sleep before my alarm went off. I rolled out of bed, pulled on my hiking gear and grabbed my new, lightweight rucksack. The car arrived and in I climbed, the first of three pickups around Ubud. Then we drove for about an hour in dozy silence, up towards the start of our trek at Toya Bungkah. But first, we stopped off at a little place that provided us with banana pancakes and coffee, and our ‘second breakfast’ for the summit (ultimately banana sandwiches and a boiled egg). Then we drove a further 15 minutes to meet our guide.

As I said, there are lots of tours, so it was no surprise to draw up to a huge car park filled with tired looking hikers gripping bottles of water and flashlights. We were organised into groups of four, given a flashlight if we didn’t have one (I’d remembered my head torch, naturally!) and sent on our way.

Our guide was, appropriately enough, named Dante, as in Dante’s Peak. The irony did not escape our group. He set a cracking pace, which was fine to begin with, but the route quickly became steep and is, by alternates, rocky or sandy. I was quickly reminded that I am not as young or fit as I was. Two months of battling an ear infection had stopped my gym visits early in January, so I quickly got out of breath compared to my younger, fitter companions. Additionally, although the ear infection was no longer rife, the aftermath of slight deafness continued, and I found myself feeling a bit dizzy the higher we climbed, which was a concern when I repeatedly stumbled. Dante, however, kept us going and made frequent rest stops.

Each rest gave us a wonderful nighttime view across Bali. The silhouette of Gunung Abang opposite us on the other side of the lake dominated the landscape, matched only by banks of cloud that regularly lit up with orange lightning. The sky was clear and the stars were out in abundance, lighting our way.

At one point we had a long rest while our guides prayed at a shrine before the steepest ascent to the summit. Bali is a Hindu country, although Balinese Hinduism is a unique blend of beliefs. They believe that spirits are everywhere and good spirits dwell in mountains and bring prosperity to people. Sadly, some groups were ignorant of local customs and failed to wait quietly while their guide prayed. It always disappoints me when people ignore local customs, as it takes very little to learn about and appreciate other people’s cultures and beliefs.

Mt. Batur is always busy, but especially so at weekends when groups of students are able to complete the walk. One thing that kept me moving against all the odds was the desire to get way from the shouting, music playing hordes and breath in the space and silence of the volcano. I’d positioned myself at the front of our group, knowing the slowest should set the pace, but I could feel the youngsters stepping on my heels behind me, perhaps not as used to walking in groups as I am. Still, I slogged on, determined to outpace them. It was more easily said than done, I can tell you.

We arrived at the summit in good time; it was still dark and clear when we arrived at the already crowded lookout. The sunrise wasn’t far behind us. The sky quickly took on a lighter glow behind Abang and the cloud-banks surrounding it. As the light increased, so did the cloud as heat and cold met. So the sunrise wasn’t a spectacular as I could have hoped. But never mind. I was high up (1717m); I was cold (such a nice feeling after constant heat and humidity – I even got to wear my favourite Rab feather down jacket and enjoy a hot chocolate from the food station near the top!); I had space around me, even though the top was crowded with snap happy student groups. I was happy to be there.

Once the day had well and truly begun and we’d been at the top for nearly an hour, we turned around and made our way back. The steep top was quickly managed, as it was mostly sand and, therefore, quick to descend using the ‘dig your heels in and slide’ method. We stopped briefly at the crater, active in 1994, and gazed at the still blackened landscape below it. We felt steam rising from fissures in the ground and dodged tourist savvy monkeys, greedy for anything they could get their hands on.

About half way down we diverted from the original route and took what could pass for a road to the bottom. It was certainly accessible to traffic as we dodged motorbikes laden with passengers and goods. It was also a good deal easier to walk after the rocky slog we had endured on the way up.

Dante discovered I was an English teacher, and, while teaching me some Indonesian phrases such as ‘kaki ku kaku’ meaning ‘my legs are stiff’, he grilled me in English grammar and the finer definitions between maybe and probably (amongst other things)!

Soon enough we were back at the car park fulfilling the ‘two hours up two hours down’ prophecy everyone had warned me about. Reunited with our driver we were quickly on our way, although the drive home seemed to take forever and I was desperate to get back and take a shower after my exertions. I had sensibly booked a massage for later that afternoon and, I have to say, it helped work out the stiffness really well. Of course, I was still rather sore for a good couple of days afterwards, but it was definitely worth every step. I had got my mountains fix, with added stars and lightning clouds and a tiny bit of sunrise, to make everything well in my world.

This article was first published at wattonswanderings.wordpress.com Image- yuwest.org

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Free hugs anyone: Italian couple spreads love to strangers in Australia

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Canberra: A young Italian couple traveling around Australia are surprising strangers across the country by offering impromptu hugs, a media report said on Monday.

hug-573809_640

Erica Della Mura, 20, and partner Nicolo Marmiroli, 21, draw crowds by standing in busy areas wearing a blindfold and with their arms outstretched, ABC reported.

A cardboard sign and small coin collection tin alerts passers-by to what the gesture means.

“I trust you. Do you trust me? Hug me. The hugs are free but if you want help us travel this beautiful country. Thanks so much,” the sign reads.

Della Mura and Marmiroli have been travelling the country together for the past seven months on working visas.

A 30-minute hug session barely makes enough in terms of donations to cover lunch – but it is not about the money, they said.

“We like to do this because it’s really, really beautiful,” Della Murra said.

“A lot of people say ‘thanks’. A lot of people say ‘safe travels’. A lot of people say nothing.”

So far they have hugged strangers in Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, Byron Bay and Brisbane.

Over the weekend they took to Noosa on the Sunshine Coast.

(IANS)