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Women Gain Weight in New Relationship

Starting a relationship means lot of love, happiness and an expanding waist line too, shows a research

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Women Gain Weight in New Relationship
Women Gain Weight in New Relationship. Pixabay
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Starting a relationship means lot of love, happiness and an expanding waist line too, shows a research.

The research, conducted by UKMedix.com, has revealed the effect that a women’s frame of mind can have on her weight.

The study also found that the average woman will gain 7.2 pounds or 3.2 kg in the first year of a new relationship. However, just under half put blame on their partner’s poor diet as the reason for weight gain, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

Also Read: Survey Shows That More Women Support Live-in Relationships in India

“It seems that our frame of mind has a huge impact on our weight, and although men seem to lose weight when in a happy relationship, the average woman will gain half a stone,” said Sarah Bailey of UKMedix.com. One stone, an old British measure, is 6.35 kg.

“Being comfortable in our love lives often equates to increased self-confidence, perhaps explaining the weight gain that many experience.” she added. (IANS)

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Study Reveals That Men Too Care For Their Female Partner’s Well Being

There were also significant differences in the levels of care given for couples where the spouse was only unofficially seen to be 'in need of care'

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The team involved 538 couples in Germany with an average age of 69, where one of them had developed the need for spousal care, between 2001-2015. Pixabay

Women, please take note. If you think that your spouse does not care for your well-being the way you do then you may be wrong, a new study has found.

The findings suggest that men respond to their spouse’s illness just as much as women do and reject previous studies suggesting that female caregivers tend to be more responsive.

“We found that unlike many previous studies on care-giving in later life — male caregivers were just as responsive towards their partner’s onset of illness as female caregivers,” said lead author Laura Langner from the University of Oxford in Britain.

For the study, published in the Journals of Gerontology, Series B, the team involved 538 couples in Germany with an average age of 69, where one of them had developed the need for spousal care, between 2001-2015.

They looked at how caregivers adjusted their hours in response to the new care need — whether directly responding to their physical needs or performing errands and housework.

Couple
Men too care for their partner’s well-being: Study. Pixabay

The researchers found that men increased their care hours as much as women did, resulting in similar levels of care once their partner became ill.

These similarities were particularly pronounced when a spouse was deemed severely ill, then there was little to no difference in the level of care given.

Perhaps surprisingly, when their spouse is severely ill, men also increase the time they spend on housework and errands, more than women, the researchers said.

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There were also significant differences in the levels of care given for couples where the spouse was only unofficially seen to be ‘in need of care’.

However, these differences disappeared in homes where no other household help was provided, when regardless of gender, male or female, spouses stepped up to care for each other, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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