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Women Gain Weight in New Relationship

Starting a relationship means lot of love, happiness and an expanding waist line too, shows a research

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Women Gain Weight in New Relationship
Women Gain Weight in New Relationship. Pixabay
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Starting a relationship means lot of love, happiness and an expanding waist line too, shows a research.

The research, conducted by UKMedix.com, has revealed the effect that a women’s frame of mind can have on her weight.

The study also found that the average woman will gain 7.2 pounds or 3.2 kg in the first year of a new relationship. However, just under half put blame on their partner’s poor diet as the reason for weight gain, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

Also Read: Survey Shows That More Women Support Live-in Relationships in India

“It seems that our frame of mind has a huge impact on our weight, and although men seem to lose weight when in a happy relationship, the average woman will gain half a stone,” said Sarah Bailey of UKMedix.com. One stone, an old British measure, is 6.35 kg.

“Being comfortable in our love lives often equates to increased self-confidence, perhaps explaining the weight gain that many experience.” she added. (IANS)

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Consumption of fibre-rich food may cut bowel diseases

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Food which are rich in fibre may help cut diabetes and reduce the weight gain
Consumption of fibre-rich food may cut bowel diseases. wikimedia commons

London, Dec 26, 2017: Regularly consuming a Western-type diet, which are high in fats and sugars but low in fibre, may increase the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases, weight gain, as well as diabetes, researchers say.

The findings showed that fibre — found in fruits, legumes, vegetables and whole grains — matters in a healthy diet.

These fibres resist digestion by the body but are readily eaten by bacteria in the gut. The amount of fibre in someone’s diet can influence weight gain, blood sugar, insulin sensitivity, and colon health.

The lack of fibre, on the other hand, results in bacteria encroaching into the mucus layer in the colon, and those bacteria promote low-grade inflammation bowel diseases, contributing to weight gain, and diabetes.

“Diets that lack fibre alter the bacterial composition and bacterial metabolism, which in turn causes defects to the inner mucus layer and allows bacteria to come close (encroach), something that triggers inflammation and ultimately metabolic disease,” said Gunnar C. Hansson, Professor at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

The results, published in the journal Cell Host and Microbe, are based on twin mice studies.

In both the studies, the team fed a group of mice a diet that was extremely low in fibre.

In the first study, after just three-seven days of eating the low-fibre diet, the mice developed problems with the protective mucus layer in the colon. This mucus layer became more penetrable and bacteria encroached upon the epithelial cells of the colon.

In the second study, the colons of mice on the low-fibre diet shrank significantly in thickness and they developed unhealthy imbalances of different gut bacteria strains.

“These findings show the importance of the inner mucus layer in separating bacteria and human host. It nicely illustrates how dynamic and quickly this responds to diet and bacterial alterations,” Hansson explained. (IANS)