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Women go for Luxury Brands due to their Social Circle: Survey

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Handbags, Pixabay

New Delhi, April 29, 2017: When it comes to buying high-end bags, most of the old-school shoppers go for luxury products because of their social circle, a survey has revealed.

My Luxury Bargain, a portal for buying and selling of pre-owned luxury, conducted a survey to understand the mindset of the old school and the new school female luxury shoppers.

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The sample size was 300 women within age group 18 to 45. The classification was – users from 18 to 32 years were considered new school and 33 to 45 years old school, read a statement.

According to the survey, as many as 63 per cent of old school shopper buy luxury products because of their social circle, and 37 per cent new school shopper buys luxury products because of the feel good factor.

It also showed that 52 per cent of old school shopper said they will stick to brands like Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Gucci and, while 48 per cent of new school shopper said they will try new brands like Saint Laurent, Miu Miu, Givenchy and Balenciaga.

According to 57 per cent of old school shoppers price of the bag has to be justified by the size of the bag and the brand name whereas 43 per cent of new school shopper buys what they like without any justification.

As many as 68 per cent of old school shoppers preferred to shop abroad and 32 per cent of new school shoppers shops through reputed foreign as well as domestic website

When it comes to accessories by high-end brands, 28 per cent of old school shoppers said that they will not buy luxury designer accessories but 72 per cent of new school shoppers were willing to buy them and use them in an innovative way. (IANS)

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Diet Drinks Increase Stroke Chances in Postmenopausal Women

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. 

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The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. Pixabay

Are diet drinks your choice? Beware, your heart could be at risk. A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say.

The stroke is was caused by a blocked artery, especially small arteries.

The study, published in the journal Stroke, showed that compared with women who consumed diet drinks less than once a week or not at all, women who consumed two or more artificially sweetened beverages per day were 23 per cent more likely to have a stroke, 31 per cent more likely to have ischemic stroke, and 29 per cent were at risk of developing heart disease (fatal or non-fatal heart attack).

In addition, there was a 16 per cent risk of deaths from any cause.

 

 

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A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say. Pixabay

Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes, findings revealed.

“Many well-meaning people, especially those who are overweight or obese, drink low-calorie sweetened drinks to cut calories in their diet. Our research and other observational studies have shown that artificially-sweetened beverages may not be harmless and high consumption is associated with a higher risk of stroke and heart disease,” said lead author Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Associate Professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the US.

For the study, researchers included 81,714 post-menopausal women aged 50-79 years.

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women.

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Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes. Pixabay

Also Read: Top 3 Factors That Play a Major Role in Fertility Issues in Women

“The American Heart Association suggests water as the best choice for a no-calorie beverage,” suggested Rachel K. Johnson, Professor at the University of Vermont in the US.

“Since long-term clinical trial data are not available on the effects of low-calorie sweetened drinks and cardiovascular health, given their lack of nutritional value, it may be prudent to limit their prolonged use,” Johnson added. (IANS)