Monday June 18, 2018

Women with larger waistline are at higher risk of anxiety

Anxiety is a concern because it is linked to heart disease, diabetes, thyroid problems, respiratory disorders, and drug abuse, among other documented medical problems

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Larger waistline can lead to obesity as well as anxiety in women. Pixabay
Larger waistline can lead to obesity. Pixabay
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  • Women with larger waistlines are more prone to anxiety
  •  The reason is said to be hormones
  • Larger waist can cause both obesity and anxiety

Ladies, take note.

If you are middle-aged with some extra kilos you may have an increased chance of developing anxiety, a new study has warned.

The study found that women in the middle and upper thirds of waist-to-height ratios were significantly more likely to have anxiety, and those in the upper third were more likely to actually display signs of anxiety compared with women in the lower two-thirds.

Waist-to-height ratio matters a lot in determining anxiety level.
Waist-to-height ratio matters a lot in determining anxiety level.

“Hormone changes may be involved in the development of both anxiety and abdominal obesity because of their roles in the brain as well as in fat distribution,” said JoAnn Pinkerton, Executive Director at the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) — a US-based non-profit organisation.

“This study provides valuable insights for healthcare providers treating middle-aged women, because it implies that waist-to-height ratio could be a good marker for evaluating patients for anxiety,” Pinkerton added. For the study, published in the Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society, researchers analysed data from more than 5,580 middle-aged Latin American women.

The cause-and-effect relationship was flipped to determine whether greater abdominal fat (defined as waist-to-height ratio in this instance) could increase a woman’s chances of developing anxiety.

Also Read: Understanding Social Anxiety Disorder And The Myths Associated

Although this is not the first time this relationship has been examined, this study is the first of its kind known to use waist-to-height ratio as the specific link to anxiety, the researchers said.

Waist-to-height ratio has been shown to be the indicator that best assesses cardiometabolic risk. A general guideline is that a woman is considered obese if her waist measures more than half of her height.

Anxiety is harmful because of various health concerns it can cause. Pixabay
Anxiety is harmful because of various health concerns it can cause. Pixabay

The findings suggested that 58 percent of the study population were postmenopausal, and 61.3 percent reported experiencing anxiety. Anxiety is a concern because it is linked to heart disease, diabetes, thyroid problems, respiratory disorders, and drug abuse, among other documented medical problems, the researchers mentioned.

Research has shown that an increase in the frequency of anxiety in women during midlife, likely as a result of decreased levels of estrogen, which has a neuroprotective role. IANS

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Depression, Anxiety May Lead to Teeth Loss

The researchers found that depression, anxiety and a combined category of depression or anxiety were significantly different in tooth loss than in the participants without such conditions

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Depression, Anxiety May Lead to Teeth Loss
Depression, Anxiety May Lead to Teeth Loss. Pixabay

Dental decay and tooth loss may not be simple medical problems and psychological issues such as depression and anxiety are linked to these conditions, research suggests.

“Tooth loss from caries (dental decay) and periodontal disease (when the gums detach from the teeth) is an outcome from complex, chronic conditions,” said the research.

“Several bio-psychosocial factors are involved, including accessing care. Individuals reporting dental anxiety may avoid dental care and individuals with depression may be negligent in self-care,” said R. Constance Wiener from West Virginia University.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, researchers used a data of 451,075 respondents and selected those who were 19 years or older, and had complete data on depression, anxiety and tooth loss.

Also Read: Green Smoothies Good For Health, But Not For Teeth

There were 76,292 eligible participants; and 13.4 percent of participants reported anxiety, 16.7 percent reported depression, and 5.7 percent reported total tooth loss.

The researchers found that depression, anxiety and a combined category of depression or anxiety were significantly different in tooth loss than in the participants without such conditions. (Bollywood Country)