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Women More Likely to Suffer Injuries than Their Male Counterparts in Frontal Car Crashes

Newer automobiles have tended to exhibit a decreased risk of injury overall

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Women, Injuries, Car Crashes
Researchers said that belted female occupants have 73 per cent greater odds of being seriously injured in frontal car crashes compared to belted males. Pixabay

 Researchers have found that women are significantly more likely to suffer injuries than their male counterparts in frontal car crashes.

Researchers said that belted female occupants have 73 per cent greater odds of being seriously injured in frontal car crashes compared to belted males (after controlling for collision severity, occupant age, stature, body mass index and vehicle model year).

“Until we understand the fundamental biomechanical factors that contribute to increased risk for females, we’ll be limited in our ability to close the risk gap,” said Jason Forman, Principal Scientist at University of Virginia.

According to the researchers, newer automobiles have tended to exhibit a decreased risk of injury overall. Specifically, risk has decreased for skull fractures, cervical spine injury and abdominal injury. Injury risks to the knee-thigh-hip region and the ankle are also significantly reduced.

Women, Injuries, Car Crashes
Researchers have found that women are significantly more likely to suffer injuries than their male counterparts in frontal car crashes. Pixabay

The study, published in the journal Traffic Injury Prevention, is an analysis of crash and injury data compiled from 1998 to 2015. These data come from a sample of police-reported crashes in the US.

It focused on frontal impact crashes with belted occupants, aged 13 and older. The data included nearly 23,000 front-end crashes involving more than 31,000 occupants, and a nearly equal number of females and males.

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“These results provide insight into where advances in the field have made gains in occupant protection, and what injury types and risk factors remain to be addressed,” Forman said. (IANS)

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Here’s Why Women Should Not Dine After 6 PM

Women who dine late in the evening are likely to develop heart diseases

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Women
Women should not consume higher proportionate of calories late in the evening. Pixabay

Women who consume a higher proportion of their daily calories late in the evening are more likely to be at risk of cardiovascular disease than women who do not, researchers have warned.

For the study, the research team assessed the cardiovascular health of 112 women using the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 measures at the beginning of the study and one year later.

Life’s Simple 7 represents the risk factors that people can improve through lifestyle changes to help achieve ideal cardiovascular health and include not smoking, being physically active, eating healthy foods and controlling body weight, along with measuring cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

A heart health score based on meeting the Life’s Simple 7 was computed.

“The preliminary results indicate that intentional eating that is mindful of the timing and proportion of calories in evening meals may represent a simple, modifiable behaviour that can help lower heart disease risk,” said study lead author Nour Makarem from Columbia University in the US.

During the study, participants of the study kept electronic food diaries by computer or cell phone to report what, how much and when they ate for one week at the beginning of the study and for one week 12 months later.

Women, heart disease
Women should consume less calories in the evening for a healthy heart. Pixabay

Data from the food diary completed by each woman was used to determine the relationship between heart health and the timing of when they ate.

Researchers found that, after 6 p.m. with every one per cent calories consumed heart health declined, especially for women.

These women were found more likely to have higher blood pressure, higher body mass index and poorer long-term control of blood sugar.

Similar findings occurred with every one per cent increase in calories consumed after 8 p.m.

Also Read- Study Associates Air Pollution With Heart Attack

“It is never too early to start thinking about your heart health whether you’re 20 or 30 or 40 or moving into the 60s and 70s. If you’re healthy now or if you have heart disease, you can always do more. That goes along with being heart smart and heart healthy,” said study researcher Kristin Newby, Professor at Duke University.

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 from November 16-18 in Philadelphia, US. (IANS)