Tuesday March 31, 2020

Here’s why Women Should Opt for Cardiac Rehabilitation Programmes

Zumba today? Cardiac rehabilitation not a 'men's club'

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cardiac exercise
Modern women living with heart disease need flexible options such as cardiac exercises. Pixabay

Cardiac rehabilitation is not a “men’s club” anymore and modern women living with heart disease need flexible options for health and lifestyle programmes that fit their busy schedules, find researchers.

Enjoyable physical activity such as Zumba, group walking, tai chi, qigong, technology-based balance exercises (Wii Fit), dancing and Nordic walking are some of the modern lifestyle methods that can keep the heart in good shape for women.

“Women tend to prioritise others before themselves,” said senior study author Dr Jennifer Reed of the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Canada.

cardiac exercise
Some women view cardiac rehabilitation as a “men’s club”. Pixabay

“The realities of modern life require women to address multiple family, community, social and work-related demands. As a result, many feel they do not have time for cardiac rehabilitation,” Reed added.

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women worldwide; in 2015, it accounted for one-third of all female deaths.

However, approximately 10-20 per cent fewer women than men participate in cardiac rehabilitation, and women are more likely to drop out (35 per cent of women quit versus 29 per cent of men).

In contrast, women are high users of local exercise classes: many women attend at least 70 per cent of the sessions on offer.

“We are experiencing a shift in family responsibilities towards more equality, but today’s women with heart disease are still more likely to be a caregiver than men,” said Sol Vidal-Almela of the University of Ottawa Heart Institute.

cardiac exercise
Zumba is a great cardiac exercise for women. Pixabay

Multiple class options throughout the day may particularly benefit younger women who report lack of time, family and work commitments as barriers to attending cardiac rehabilitation, said the study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

To reach this conclusion, the authors reviewed a decade of literature to identify what stops women with heart disease from attending cardiac rehabilitation.

Multiple barriers to participation were identified. Some women view cardiac rehabilitation as a “men’s club”. Classes are at set times and incompatible with women’s daily schedules.

Women do not enjoy the physical activity offered and it does not fit their needs: some find it too physically demanding, while others want it to be more challenging.

Women frequently lack social support and feel guilty for deserting their family, said the study.

Older women may benefit from exercises to help them perform daily activities (dressing, reaching a cupboard, moving in and out of a chair or bed) and reduce their risk of falls, while younger women may prefer more challenging activities such as high-intensity interval training, the authors suggested.

Also Read- Here’s a List of Tasty and Healthy Snacking Options

“Women have been underrepresented in cardiovascular research. The assumption that findings from studies predominantly including males will be generalisable to females represents a barrier to the advancement of cardiac rehabilitation to meet the needs of women and men,” elaborated Reed. (IANS)

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Most Infants Consume Added Sugar: Study

Is your toddler consuming added sugar?

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infants sugar
A large majority of infants between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume added sugars. Pixabay

Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets; primarily in the form of flavoured yogurts and fruit drinks, a study has found.

A large majority of toddlers between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume these sugars – possibly laying early foundations to unhealthy eating habits, found a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier.

“Our study, which is the first to look at trends in added sugars consumption by infants and toddlers, documents that most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns,” explained lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick.

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She cited an earlier study that found that 6-year-olds who had consumed any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) before the age of one were more than twice as likely to consume an SSB at least once a day compared to 6-year-olds who had not consumed any before the age of one.

infants sugar
Most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns. Pixabay

Dr. Herrick noted, “Previous research into the diets of children over two years old associated sugar consumption with the development of cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure and altered lipid profiles.”

The findings showed that toddlers consumed about 1 teaspoon of added sugars daily (equivalent to about 2 percent of their daily caloric intake), while toddlers consumed about 6 tsp of sugars (about 8 percent of their daily caloric intake).

The top food sources of added sugars for infants included yogurt, baby snacks and sweets, and sweet bakery products. For toddlers, the top sources included fruit drinks, sweet and baked products, and sugar and candy.

According to Dr. Herrick, parents should be mindful of added sugars levels in the foods chosen when weaning their infants.

Please follow NewsGram on Instagram to get updates on the latest news.

” The transition from a milk-based diet (breast milk and formula) to table foods has an impact on nutrition, taste preference, and eating patterns. More work is needed to understand this critical period.” She recommends discussing which solid foods to introduce during weaning with a child’s healthcare provider.Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets; primarily in the form of flavoured yogurts and fruit drinks, a study has found.

A large majority of infants between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume these sugars – possibly laying early foundations to unhealthy eating habits, found a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier.

“Our study, which is the first to look at trends in added sugars consumption by infants and toddlers, documents that most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns,” explained lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick.

She cited an earlier study that found that 6-year-olds who had consumed any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) before the age of one were more than twice as likely to consume an SSB at least once a day compared to 6-year-olds who had not consumed any before the age of one.

Dr. Herrick noted, “Previous research into the diets of children over two years old associated sugar consumption with the development of cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure and altered lipid profiles.”

infants sugar
Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets. Pixabay

The findings showed that infants consumed about 1 teaspoon of added sugars daily (equivalent to about 2 percent of their daily caloric intake), while toddlers consumed about 6 tsp of sugars (about 8 percent of their daily caloric intake).

Please follow NewsGram on Twitter to get updates on the latest news

The top food sources of added sugars for infants included yogurt, baby snacks and sweets, and sweet bakery products. For toddlers, the top sources included fruit drinks, sweet and baked products, and sugar and candy.

According to Dr. Herrick, parents should be mindful of added sugars levels in the foods chosen when weaning their infants.

Also Read- Night-Shift Workers More Prone To Get Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes

” The transition from a milk-based diet (breast milk and formula) to table foods has an impact on nutrition, taste preference, and eating patterns. More work is needed to understand this critical period.” She recommends discussing which solid foods to introduce during weaning with a child’s healthcare provider. (IANS)