Tuesday April 23, 2019

Women with asthma more likely to have underweight babies

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Asthma
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London, Oct 5 : Women suffering from asthma are more prone to develop preeclampsia, a dangerous pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure – and run a higher risk of giving birth to underweight babies, says a new study.

Asthma is a common disease caused by chronic inflammation in the lungs with symptoms of coughing and breathlessness.

The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, suggests that well-controlled asthma during pregnancy could reduce the relative incidence of complications during pregnancy and childbirth.

“We found that the risk of preeclampsia is 17 per cent higher in women with asthma compared to women without asthma,” said the study’s lead author Gustaf Rejno from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

The researchers used data from the Swedish birth registers and examined the link between asthma in pregnant women and the relative pregnancy and delivery outcomes.

After studying more than one million births to just over 700,000 women between 2001 and 2013, it was found that 10 per cent of the babies born had a mother suffering from asthma.

In addition, women with asthma were more likely to have underweight babies, instrumental deliveries, caesarean sections and shorter pregnancies.

In order to ascertain whether the complications could be attributed to hereditary or environmental factors, the researchers also identified the women’s asthma-free cousins and sisters who had given birth during the same period.

On comparing the groups they found that the correlations between maternal asthma and complications during pregnancy and delivery held.

“It seems to be the asthma per se that causes these complications,” Rejno said. (IANS)

Next Story

Preeclampsia Test can Quickly Identify Dangerous Condition During Pregnancy

Researchers at the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center have developed a fast, easy test to diagnose preeclampsia

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A new test can quickly identify a common and dangerous condition during pregnancy and help keep mothers and babies healthy and safe. VOA

A new test can quickly identify preeclampsia, a common and dangerous condition during pregnancy and help keep mothers and babies healthy and safe.

When Jessi Prizinsky was pregnant with her first child, her feet started swelling.

“Well, you hear, everybody tell you, you know, the swollen ankles, and get your feet up and all that,” Prizinsky said. “That was where I thought, ‘OK.’ And then it started to be, it kind of looks like it’s in my arms and hands, too.”

Most women expect some swelling when they are pregnant. But these symptoms can also be signs of preeclampsia.

It’s a complication of pregnancy that raises the mother’s blood pressure and affects the blood flow to the placenta. This can lead to smaller or premature babies. Untreated, it can be fatal to mom, or baby, or both.

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Most women expect some swelling when they are pregnant. But these symptoms can also be signs of preeclampsia. Pixabay

Fast, easy test developed

Researchers at the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center have developed a fast, easy test to diagnose preeclampsia. That’s where Dr. Kara Rood practices maternal and fetal medicine.

“One of the hard parts with preeclampsia is there’s a lot of symptoms of just pregnancy alone, and other medical conditions that have similar symptoms that the women experience, like high blood pressure, headaches, changes in vision. Those can be attributed to a lot of other things,” Rood said.

Preeclampsia is more serious if it occurs earlier in the pregnancy, or in a woman who had high blood pressure before getting pregnant.

Rood says managing this condition early is best for both mothers and babies.

Pixabay
Researchers at the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center have developed a fast, easy test to diagnose preeclampsia. That’s where Dr. Kara Rood practices maternal and fetal medicine. Pixabay

“Without the certainty of this test aiding in the diagnosis,” she said, “we as providers are definitely overcautious, as this is definitely something we don’t want to miss because of the life-threatening results of a misdiagnosis for moms and babies.”

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Listen to your body

Because of her preeclampsia, Prizinsky was induced three weeks early. She had a successful second pregnancy and has this advice for other women.

“The biggest thing is listening to your body,” she said.

The test is so easy, women can take it at home, and preeclampsia can be treated as soon as it develops. The researchers expect the test to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the next few years. (VOA)