Sunday February 24, 2019
Home Uncategorized Women in the ...

Women in the work sector: Not much has changed

0
//
Image source: huffingtonpost.in

New Delhi: According to a survey conducted recently, women tend to quit their jobs more often than men especially the ones who are working in the private sector. The glass ceiling remains unbroken due to a number of factors, including sexism and harassment at the office.

“About 40 percent of working mothers want to quit jobs to raise their kids. Gender bias together with workplace harassment and inconvenient working hours remained top reasons as to why the majority of respondents wanted to quit their jobs,” said a survey conducted by the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India (ASSOCHAM) under the aegis of its Social Development Foundation.

The survey was conducted ahead of International Women’s Day that is celebrated globally every year on March 8.

The association had interacted with a total of about 500 working women, including 200 working mothers in 10 cities of Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Chandigarh, Chennai, Delhi-NCR, Hyderabad, Jaipur, Lucknow, Mumbai, and Pune during the course of past fortnight to gauge their career related goals.

About 25 percent of the total respondents said they wanted to quit their jobs and cited various reasons ranging from inconvenient working hours or late sitting, pay gap, gender bias, workplace harassment, lack of safety, poor working conditions, the pursuit of higher education, family related issues and others, the survey said.

Motherhood and lack of quality time with family were the primary reasons to quit for 80 out of 200 working mothers interviewed by the association.

Regarding harassment, about 30 percent of the total women interviewed by ASSOCHAM said they had been harassed at work, were denied promotion and plum assignments.

Besides, many of them also said they did not get much support from their authorities if they complained and, as a result, felt bogged down further due to guilt and shame.

Most of the respondents said their organizations did not have redressal mechanisms in place and did not comply with legal requirements to provide a safe workplace for women and display a very casual approach to such issues.(IANS)

Next Story

Risk of Cervical Cancer Highest in Middle-aged Indian Women

" While PAP test is much more likely to miss precancerous cervical disease, HPV testing is more sensitive for detecting localised infection and marginally less sensitive for distant infection," Das noted

0
Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

Nearly 50 per cent of middle-aged women in India were found to have positive cases of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) — the main risk factor for cervical cancer, says a report from SRL Diagnostics.

Human papilloma virus (HPV) is a group of viruses that are extremely common worldwide. There are more than 100 types of HPV, of which at least 14 are cancer-causing (also known as high risk type).

The virus is mainly transmitted through sexual contact and most people are infected with HPV shortly after the onset of sexual activity.

Two HPV types (16 and 18) cause 70 per cent of cervical cancers and precancerous cervical lesions.

Analysis of HPV test reports of 4,500 women pan-India between 2014 and 2018, showed that women aged between 31 and 45 years had the highest percentage of high-risk HPV at 47 per cent.

This was followed by 30 per cent of women aged between 16 and 30 years being affected by the risk.

Cancer survivor, flickr

Cervical cancer accounts for one-third of all global deaths, with 74,000 deaths occurring annually and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women in India.

However, “cervical cancer is also the only cancer which is preventable if care is taken in the initial stage”, said B.R Das from SRL Diagnostics in a statement issued here on Saturday.

“The high mortality rate from cervical cancer globally could be reduced through a comprehensive approach that includes screening, early diagnosis and treatment programmes,” he added.

Also Read- Premature to Say Social Media Use Leads to Depression

Besides vaccination before girls become sexually active, secondary prevention can be done by regular cervical smear of PAP smear which can pick up any abnormal cells in the cervix before they become cancerous.

“While PAP test is much more likely to miss precancerous cervical disease, HPV testing is more sensitive for detecting localised infection and marginally less sensitive for distant infection,” Das noted. (IANS)