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Wonder Woman Gal Gadot says second pregnancy was ‘part of the plan’

Gal Gadot was in the early stages of her pregnancy while filming "Justice League".

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Gal Gadot
Gal Gadot talks about her well-planned pregnancy. Wikimedia

Los Angeles, November 6, 2017 : Actress Gal Gadot had planned her second pregnancy well so that it caused minimal disruption to her work commitments.

The 32-year-old actress – who has daughters Alma, six, and Maya, seven months, with husband Yaron Versano – says she knew she wanted a second child, but wanted to plan it carefully, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

“I scheduled it so I wasn’t going to be too pregnant for ‘Justice League’ or when I promoted ‘Wonder Woman’. I had a lot of luck. It’s been difficult, but I had wanted to have a second child for a while,” Gadot told Glamour magazine.

She was in the early stages of her pregnancy while filming “Justice League”.

“It was challenging with morning sickness and migraines. But you adjust. You get used to feeling like s**t and having to perform,” she said, and added that working with the likes of Ben Affleck, Jason Momoa, Henry Cavill and Ezra Miller in the movie was fun”.

“Making the film with so many men, I’ve never felt so safe. Big men!”

The success of “Wonder Woman” led to several offers come her way, but Gal Gadot remains grounded.

“I’m super-appreciative because I know it’s all a big game and the rules are known in advance. When you’re successful, the phone will ring, if a film flops, there will be crickets. So I take everything with a grain of salt and enjoy it while it’s there,” she added. (IANS)

 

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Most Pregnant Women Depend on Their Mothers For Guidance: Study

The researchers performed in-depth interviews with pregnant women and their mothers while following the pregnant women for nine months

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Pregnant Women
The study also found that Pregnant Women with higher education still found a great value in what their mothers could tell them about how their bodies would be changing and were a valuable source for details related to their familial or genetic inheritance -- information that only their mothers could contribute. Pixabay

Most Pregnant Women still rely on their mothers for emotional support and guidance — many weighing mother’s advice as equal to or even over medical recommendation, a new study suggests.

For the study, published in the journal Reproduction, the research team from University of Cincinnati, investigated the complexities within mother-daughter dynamics during pregnancy in relation to potentially harmful advice from many pregnancy guidebooks, looking specifically at the emotional and health care risks to certain groups.

The researchers performed in-depth interviews with pregnant women and their mothers while following the pregnant women for nine months.

“I found that most pregnancy self-help books, best known for their month-by-month guidance on fetal development and lifestyle coaching, are also empathic about following medical advice exclusively over what they consider the outdated advice of a mother or friend,” said study researcher Danielle Bessett from University of Cincinnati.

“This advice is limited and can result in an increased level of stress and discomfort for some soon-to-be moms,” Bessett added.

While looking at two groups — pregnant women with at least a bachelor’s degree and women with no college or higher education — Bessett found that all pregnant women took steps to have a healthy pregnancy.

But while the researcher identified a pervasive link to a mother’s influence on her daughter’s health and well-being in both groups, it was especially strong for minorities and women with less than a college degree who had little trust in their medical personnel.

Women with higher education engaged with their mothers in ways much more similar to how they are framed in common self-help books.

“Self-help books are giving us a really terrible picture of soon-to-be grandmothers that pregnant women themselves don’t really fully endorse regardless of who they are,” said Bessett.

“I argue that books are strictly endorsing medical guidance exclusively and that’s not the only place where women are getting their information,” Besset added.

 

Pregnant Women
Most Pregnant Women still rely on their mothers for emotional support and guidance — many weighing mother’s advice as equal to or even over medical recommendation, a new study suggests. Pixabay

While highly educated women engaged with their mothers in a more limited way, women with lower education engaged with their mothers more in-depth about everything and ranked their mothers as the most valuable source of information, the study said.

ALSO READ: Marine Animals Can Help Humans Monitor Oceans: Study

The study also found that women with higher education still found a great value in what their mothers could tell them about how their bodies would be changing and were a valuable source for details related to their familial or genetic inheritance — information that only their mothers could contribute.

“One of the most distinctive differences between the two groups showed how much more women with higher education valued how scientific information and modern technology could contribute to a healthy pregnancy,” said Bessett. (IANS)