Sunday September 15, 2019

Watch Out For Work Stress! Might Result in High B.P.

"If you have high demands but also high control, in other words you can make decisions, this may even be positive for health"

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blood pressure
In the study, work stress was defined as jobs with high demand and low control -- for example when an employer wants results but denies authority to make decisions. Pixabay

If you are finding it hard to deal with the pressure at the workplace, there is more reason to worry. New research has found that work stress and impaired sleep are linked to a threefold higher risk of cardiovascular death in employees with hypertension.

“Sleep should be a time for recreation, unwinding, and restoring energy levels. If you have stress at work, sleep helps you recover,” said study author Karl-Heinz Ladwig, Professor at Technical University of Munich, Germany.

“Unfortunately poor sleep and job stress often go hand in hand, and when combined with hypertension the effect is even more toxic,” Ladwig said.

work stress
People with work stress alone had a 1.6-fold higher risk while those with only poor sleep had a 1.8-times higher risk, the study said. Pixabay

The study included around 2,000 hypertensive workers aged 25-65, without cardiovascular disease or diabetes.

Compared to those with no work stress and good sleep, people with both risk factors had a three times greater likelihood of death from cardiovascular disease, showed the findings published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

People with work stress alone had a 1.6-fold higher risk while those with only poor sleep had a 1.8-times higher risk, the study said.

sleep
“Sleep should be a time for recreation, unwinding, and restoring energy levels.”

In the study, work stress was defined as jobs with high demand and low control — for example when an employer wants results but denies authority to make decisions.

Also Read: Even After Three Days, Nearly 700 Still in Measles Quarantine in Los Angeles

“If you have high demands but also high control, in other words you can make decisions, this may even be positive for health,” said Ladwig.

“But being entrapped in a pressured situation that you have no power to change is harmful,” Ladwig added. (IANS)

Next Story

Taking Hot Bath at Least 90 Minutes before Bedtime Your can be Ticket to Sound Sleep

Biomedical engineers at University of Texas-Austin reached this conclusion after analyzing thousands of studies linking water-based passive body heating

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Hot Bath, Sleep, Bedtime
Just remember that the water temperature should be around 40-42 degrees Celsius, else you may not get better shuteye. Pixabay

 Taking hot bath at least 90 minutes before bedtime is your ticket to sound sleep. Just remember that the water temperature should be around 40-42 degrees Celsius, else you may not get better shuteye.

Biomedical engineers at University of Texas-Austin reached this conclusion after analyzing thousands of studies linking water-based passive body heating, or bathing and showering with warm/hot water, with improved sleep quality.

“When we looked through all known studies, we noticed significant disparities in terms of the approaches and findings,” said Shahab Haghayegh, lead author on the paper.

“The only way to make an accurate determination of whether sleep can, in fact, be improved was to combine all the past data and look at it through a new lens.”

Hot Bath, Sleep, Bedtime
Taking hot bath at least 90 minutes before bedtime is your ticket to sound sleep. Pixabay

In collaboration with the UT Health Science Center at Houston and the University of Southern California, the researchers reviewed 5,322 studies.

Meta-analytical tools were used to assess the consistency between relevant studies and showed that an optimum temperature of between 104 and 109 degrees Fahrenheit (40-42 degrees Celsius) improved overall sleep quality.

When scheduled one-two hours before bedtime, it can also hasten the speed of falling asleep by an average of 10 minutes.

It is understood that both sleep and our body’s core temperature are regulated by a circadian clock located within the brain’s hypothalamus that drives the 24-hour patterns of many biological processes, including sleep and wakefulness.

Also Read- Suffering From Low Blood Pressure? Do an Hour or More of Daily Exercise

The average person’s circadian cycle is characterized by a reduction in core body temperature of about 0.5 to 1 Fahrenheit around an hour before usual sleep time — dropping to its lowest level between the middle and later span of night-time sleep.

It then begins to rise, acting as a kind of a biological alarm clock wake-up signal.

The researchers found the optimal timing of bathing for cooling down of core body temperature in order to improve sleep quality is about 90 minutes before going to bed.

“If baths are taken at the right biological time — 1-2 hours before bedtime — they will aid the natural circadian process and increase one’s chances of not only falling asleep quickly but also of experiencing better quality sleep,” showed the findings appeared in the journal Sleep Medicine Reviews. (IANS)