Tuesday February 25, 2020

Workout Before Breakfast Can Make You Fit

A research team also wanted to focus on the impact on the fat stores in muscles for individuals who either worked out before or after eating and the effect this had on insulin response to feeding

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Workout
A six-week study, which involved 30 men classified as obese or overweight and compared results from two intervention groups (who ate breakfast before/after Exercise) and a control group (who made no lifestyle changes), found that people who do Workout before breakfast burned double the amount of fat than the group who exercised after breakfast. Pixabay

Fitness enthusiasts, take a note! Researchers have found that Workout before breakfast could increase health benefits of exercise.

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, the Universities of Bath and Birmingham found that by changing the timing of when you eat and exercise, one can better control the blood sugar levels.

“We found that the men in the study who exercised before breakfast burned double the amount of fat than the group who exercised after,” said study author Javier Gonzalez from the University of Bath.

“Our results suggest that changing the timing of when you eat in relation to when you exercise can bring about profound and positive changes to your overall health,” Gonzalez said.

Workout
Fitness enthusiasts, take a note! Researchers have found that Workout before breakfast could increase health benefits of exercise. Pixabay

The six-week study, which involved 30 men classified as obese or overweight and compared results from two intervention groups (who ate breakfast before/after exercise) and a control group (who made no lifestyle changes), found that people who performed exercise before breakfast burned double the amount of fat than the group who exercised after breakfast.

They found that increased fat use is mainly due to lower insulin levels during exercise when people have fasted overnight, which means that they can use more of the fat from their fat tissue and the fat within their muscles as a fuel.

While this did not lead to any differences for weight loss over six weeks, it did have ‘profound and positive’ effects on their health because their bodies were better able to respond to insulin, keeping blood sugar levels under control and potentially lowering the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

The research team also wanted to focus on the impact on the fat stores in muscles for individuals who either worked out before or after eating and the effect this had on insulin response to feeding.

Workout
Changing the timing of when you eat in relation to when you Workout can bring about profound and positive changes to your overall health. Pixabay

Over the six-week trial, the research team found that the muscles from the group who exercised before breakfast were more responsive to insulin compared to the group who exercised after breakfast, in spite of identical training sessions and matched food intake.

The muscles from those who exercised before breakfast also showed greater increases in key proteins, specifically those involved in transporting glucose from the bloodstream to the muscles.

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For the insulin response to feeding after the six-week study, remarkably, the group who exercised after breakfast were in fact no better than the control group, the study said. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s Why Diabetes May be an Independent Risk Factor For Heart Failure

Diabetes is also a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and this eventually leads to blockage of coronary arteries

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Disease
According to health expert in India, if poorly controlled, diabetes leads to cardiomyopathy resulting in progressive deterioration of pumping capacity of heart. Pixabay

Heart problems are a common development for people with diabetes and now researchers have found that diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in the community dwelling population.

According to health expert in India, if poorly controlled, diabetes leads to cardiomyopathy resulting in progressive deterioration of pumping capacity of heart.

“Diabetes is also a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and this eventually leads to blockage of coronary arteries. This leads to heart attack or myocardial infarction,” Satish Koul, HOD and Director Internal Medicine, Narayana Superspeciality Hospital, Gurugram, told IANS. “Due to myocardial infarction, the heart muscle becomes weak and eventually heart fails as a pump leading to congestive heart failure,” Koul added.

According to the current study, published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers evaluated the long-term impact of diabetes on the development of heart failure, both with preserved ejection fraction – a measurement of the percentage of blood leaving the heart with each contraction – and reduced ejection fraction.

They also looked at mortality in a community population, controlling for hypertension, coronary artery disease and diastolic function. From an initial group of 2,042 residents of Olmsted County in US, 116 study participants with diabetes were matched 1:2 for age, hypertension, sex, coronary artery disease and diastolic dysfunction to 232 participants without diabetes.

Over the 10-year follow-up period, 21 per cent of participants with diabetes developed heart failure, independent of other causes. In comparison, only 12 per cent of patients without diabetes developed heart failure. Cardiac death, heart attack and stroke were not statistically different in the study between the two groups.

The study shows that diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in the community dwelling population. Furthermore, the outcome data support the concept of a diabetic cardiomyopathy.

Heart Disease
Heart problems are a common development for people with diabetes and now researchers have found that diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in the community dwelling population. Pixabay

This research extends previous findings and demonstrates that even without a known cardiac structural abnormality and with a normal ejection fraction, diabetic patients are still at increased risk of developing heart failure as compared to their nondiabetic counterparts.

“The key takeaway is that diabetes mellitus alone is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure,” said study senior author Horng Chen from Mayo Clinic in the US.

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“Our hope is that this study provides a strong foundation for further investigations into diabetes and heart failure. There is still much to learn and study in terms of this association and how to best diagnose and treat this condition,” Chen added. (IANS)