Thursday December 12, 2019
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Positive Workplace Raises Productivity in Employees

This would then translate to improved quality of care given to clients

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staff, work
Unhealthy habits can be hazardous to your health. Pixabay

Want better output from your employees? Promoting an environment of growth for all would lead to higher satisfaction, innovation, trust and retention among workers, say researchers.

When employees feel valued for their personal characteristics and are recognised as important members, employee engagement, trust, satisfaction, commitment and retention improve, said Kim Brimhall, Assistant Professor at the Binghamton University in the US.

The findings showed that leaders who encourage every worker regardless of their educational background or job responsibilities are more likely to increase the feelings of inclusion.

This then leads to increased innovation, employee job satisfaction and quality of services in organisations.

If your workplace is supporting its employees by reducing their job strain, it may boost in preventing new cases of common mental illness from occurring up to 14 per cent, a new study suggests.
Stress at work place is linked to mental illness as well. Pixabay

“Leader engagement, that is, a leader’s ability to actively engage all organisational members in critical decision making, may foster a climate for inclusion and positive organisational outcomes, such as a climate for innovation, job satisfaction and perceived quality of care,” said Brimhall.

The results have been published in the journal Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly.

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Brimhall hopes to develop economically practical, evidence-based tools that leaders can utilise to create work environments where employees feel included, thereby leading to overall improvement towards their job.

This would then translate to improved quality of care given to clients. (IANS)

Next Story

Once a Cheater, Always a Cheater

Cheater at school means cheater at workplace

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Cheater
If you were a cheater at school then you are likely to be on at your workplace. Wikimedia Commons

Once a cheater, always a cheater may be a true saying as researchers now discover that students’ tolerance for cheating may spill over into their careers.

The study by professors at two California State University campuses, including San Francisco State University, tackled two questions: If students tolerate cheating in the classroom, will they also tolerate unethical behavior in their careers? And what’s shaping these attitudes?

“If [students] have this attitude while they’re in school — that it’s OK to cheat in school — that attitude unfortunately will carry over to the corporate boardroom,” said San Francisco State Professor and Chair of Marketing Foo Nin Ho.

The fear is that these lax attitudes, if left unchecked, could manifest later as turning a blind eye to unethical business behaviour or participating in a cover-up, added the study’s lead author Glen Brodowsky from California State University San Marcos.

To conduct the study, the authors surveyed nearly 250 undergraduate marketing students.

cheater at school
If a student can tolerate cheating in school then he/she is most likely to be a cheater at workplace. Wikimedia Commons

They were asked to respond to statements about cheating and ethics such as “It’s cheating to ask another student what was on the test” and “Within a business firm, the ends justify the means.”

The survey found that students who were more tolerant of cheating in a classroom also demonstrated an openness to unethical behaviour on the job.

Some students face enormous pressure from their families to succeed in college, so those students may engage in cheating to avoid the shame of flunking out, the findings showed.

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Understanding the cultural forces at work could help professors develop culturally sensitive ways to minimize these unethical behaviours in their classrooms.

“As professors, we need to set the tone and say, ‘This is what’s not rewarded in the classroom’ and train students that following ethical behaviour leads to better outcomes,” Brodowsky said. “So when they graduate and work for companies they will better equipped to evaluate that situation.” (IANS)