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World lacks enough “global political will” to prioritise Children: Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi

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Mr. Kailash Satyarthi, Wikimedia
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Kolkata, April 22, 2017: Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi on Saturday said the world lacks enough “global political will” to prioritise children and adequate budgetary allocations have not been made for education, health and child protection.

“There is a need of global political will to prioritise children and that is not so adequate which is supposed to be. I always call upon the government to protect one generation. You need not to worry about next generation. They will protect themselves.

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“Unfortunately, we do not have the enough global political will where children are prioritised, the policies are for the betterment of the children, laws are properly enforced and where adequate budgetary allocations are made to ensure education, health and protection of children,” said Satyarthi at an interactive session with Merchants’ Chamber of Commerce and Industry here.

Satyarthi, whose organisation has been working in 144 countries across the world for child protection and was as jointly awarded the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, said there is strong correlation between child labour and unemployment.

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“Globally, 168 million child labourers are working in the harshest conditions while 210 million adults are jobless,” he said

Citing National Crime Records Bureau data, he said 11 children go missing in India every hour and half of them are never rescued.

Hailing Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao’ programme, he said: “Girl child is not safe. Most of them do not feel safe at home as they are often sexually abused by their relatives. Even the boys are not safe.”

He called for a collective moral responsibility from every citizen as well as corporates and the government to come forward for the protecting children. (IANS)

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A lesson in the woods may boost kids’ learning

Moreover, the number of times the teacher had to redirect a student's attention to their work was roughly halved immediately after an outdoor lesson.

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Just sitting in classrooms makes children more dull. Wikimedia Commons
Just sitting in classrooms makes children more dull. Wikimedia Commons
  • To help students concentrate and learn more, teachers have found a new way of teaching them.
  • This technique of teaching outdoors will boost children’s mental capabilities to learn and remember.

Are your students unable to concentrate on their lessons in the classroom? Take them for outdoor learning sessions.

According to a study, a lesson in the lap of nature can significantly increase children’s attention level and boost their learning.

While adults exposed to parks, trees or wildlife have been known to experience benefits such as increased physical activity, stress reduction, rejuvenated attention and increased motivation, in children, even a view of greenery through a classroom window can have positive effects on their attention span, the researchers said.

The study showed that post an outdoor lesson, students were significantly more attentive and engaged with their schoolwork and were not overexcited or inattentive.

Taking students outside help them concentrate more. Wikimedia Commons
Taking students outside help them concentrate more. Wikimedia Commons

Moreover, the number of times the teacher had to redirect a student’s attention to their work was roughly halved immediately after an outdoor lesson.

“Our teachers were able to teach uninterrupted for almost twice as long at a time after the outdoor lesson and we saw the nature effect with our sceptical teacher as well,” said Ming Kuo, a scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the US.

For the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, researchers tested their hypothesis in third graders (9-10 years old) in a school.

A few minutes outside help students concentrate better. VOA
A few minutes outside help students concentrate better. VOA

Over a 10-week period, an experienced teacher held one lesson a week outdoors and a similar lesson in her regular classroom and another, more sceptical teacher did the same. Their outdoor “classroom” was a grassy spot just outside the school, in view of a wooded area.

A previous research suggested that 15 minutes of self-paced exercise can also significantly improve a child’s mood, attention and memory. IANS