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World of Work Must Adapt to Unprecedented Changes to Ensure a Sustainable Future

The challenges facing the agency over the next 100 years are likely to be even more daunting

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FILE - U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres. VOA

U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres is warning the world has to adapt to unprecedented changes in the world of work to ensure a sustainable future and create a more just society.  Guterres spoke at the International Labor Conference.

In congratulating the International Labor Organization on its centenary anniversary, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres cites the ILO’s many achievements in establishing labor standards that have improved the safety and quality of work for millions of people.

He says the challenges facing the agency over the next 100 years are likely to be even more daunting.

“As we look ahead, we know new technologies — especially artificial intelligence — will inevitably lead to a massive destruction of jobs and a massive creation of new jobs,” said Guterres. “It is difficult to now foresee all these impacts, but it is clear that the future will require a range of new and different skills.”

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U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres is warning the world has to adapt to unprecedented changes. Pixabay

To keep abreast of new demands, he says governments will have to make large investments in education that are flexible and based on the learning needs of a lifetime.

Guterres says the well-being of people must be at the center of economic and social policies.  That involves the creation of decent work that is sustainable for the long run.  He notes a sustainable future for the world of work is not possible without addressing the urgent demands of climate change.

“Addressing the climate emergency is indeed the defining issue of our time.  Climate action could create millions of sustainable jobs,” said Guterres. “Green business has proven to be good business.  But climate change is moving faster than we are and we are risking a future with increased instability, inequality and poverty.”

The U.N. chief says new momentum must be injected into the climate change debate.  He says the new momentum is needed to transform political and economic systems to meet the goals set in the Paris Climate Accord to reduce emissions that are harming the survivability of the planet.

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He says he hopes to move in that direction by convening a climate action summit in September at U.N. headquarters in New York. (VOA)

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Most Distant World Ever Explored Gets New Name. Check it Here

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the snowman-shaped Arrokoth on New Year's Day, 3 years after exploring Pluto

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FILE - This Jan. 1, 2019 image made available by NASA shows "Arrokoth" which means "sky" in the language of the Native American Powhatan people. VOA

The most distant world ever explored 4 billion miles away finally has an official name: Arrokoth.

That means “sky” in the language of the Native American Powhatan people, NASA said Tuesday.

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft flew past the snowman-shaped Arrokoth on New Year’s Day, 3 years after exploring Pluto. At the time, this small icy world 1 billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto was nicknamed Ultima Thule given its vast distance from us.

“The name ‘Arrokoth’ reflects the inspiration of looking to the skies,” lead scientist Alan Stern of Southwest Research Institute said in a statement, “and wondering about the stars and worlds beyond our own.”

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That means “sky” in the language of the Native American Powhatan people, NASA said Tuesday. Wikimedia Commons

The name was picked because of the Powhatan’s ties to the Chesapeake Bay region.

New Horizons is operated from Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Maryland. The Hubble Space Telescope — which discovered Arrokoth in 2014 — has its science operations in Baltimore.

The New Horizons team got consent for the name from Powhatan Tribal elders and representatives, according to NASA. The International Astronomical Union and its Minor Planet Center approved the choice.

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Arrokoth is among countless objects in the so-called Kuiper Belt, or vast Twilight Zone beyond the orbit of Neptune. New Horizons will observe some of these objects from afar as it makes its way deeper into space. (VOA)