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Worldwide Customer Experience and Relationship Management Software Market Grew 15.6% in 2018: Gartner

Worldwide enterprise application software revenue totalled more than $193.6 billion in 2018

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Worldwide, Customer, Relationship
CRM remains both the largest and the fastest growing enterprise application software category. Pixabay

Global spending on customer experience and relationship management (CRM) software grew 15.6 per cent to touch $48.2 billion in 2018, a new report from Gartner said on Monday.

CRM remains both the largest and the fastest growing enterprise application category.

Worldwide enterprise application revenue totalled more than $193.6 billion in 2018, a 12.5 per cent increase from the 2017 revenue of $172.1 billion.

“Cloud growth has dropped slightly in 2018 but remains strong at 20 per cent and significantly above the overall growth rate of 15.6 per cent for CRM,” Julian Poulter, Senior Director Analyst at Gartner, said in a statement.

Worldwide, Customer, Relationship
Global spending on customer experience and relationship management (CRM) grew 15.6 per cent to touch $48.2 billion in 2018. Pixabay

“As an early mover to the Cloud, CRM is probably seeing a gradual reduction in cloud growth rates due to high adoption,” the statement added.

The top five CRM vendors accounted for more than 40 per cent of the total market in 2018.

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The top five vendors had very little change in ranking compared with 2017, although Microsoft climbed into the fifth position, narrowly displacing Genesys. (IANS)

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Richer Countries Show Lower Trust in Vaccines

A global survey by the British health research charity Wellcome found that about 8 in 10 people

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vaccine preventable diseases
WHO reports Nigeria, India and Pakistan have the lowest vaccination rates. VOA

The majority of people worldwide think vaccines are safe but the doubters make it impossible to win the war on preventable illnesses.

A global survey by the British health research charity Wellcome found that about 8 in 10 people, or 79%, agreed that vaccines are safe, and 9 in 10 worldwide say their children have been vaccinated.

But in order to protect whole populations, immunization coverage rates must generally be above 90% or 95%, according to the World Health Organization.

The survey asked more than 140,000 people in 140 countries about their attitudes toward science and medicine.

Vaccines, Worldwide, Safe
The majority of people worldwide think vaccines are safe but the doubters make it impossible to win the war. Pixabay

It found that in wealthier nations, where rates of infectious diseases are low, people tend to be more skeptical about the safety of vaccines. While in poorer countries people believe vaccines to be safe, effective and important for children.

France led the list of countries with the most skeptics. A third of French people do not agree that immunization is safe, by contrast 98% of those in Bangladesh believe that vaccines are both safe and effective.

“And in some of these regions, greater scientific knowledge or levels of education is actually associated with less confidence in vaccines,” the report says. “This suggests that putting out more scientific information, or trying to educate more people, will not be enough to change minds on this issue.”

In North America, just 72% of those surveyed said vaccines were safe. The numbers were even lower in Europe — 59% in Western Europe and 40% in Eastern Europe.

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“Anxieties and public concerns about the safety of vaccines have always existed, but the rise of social media has allowed the spread of what UNICEF calls the ‘real infection of misinformation’ to much wider audiences,” the report says.

Vaccines have been credited for completely ridding the world of small pox and coming close to eliminating other diseases, such as polio.

But other illnesses are making a resurgence. In the U.S. alone, the number of measles cases this year has exceeded a thousand.

“I guess you could call it the ‘complacency effect,'” said Wellcome’s Imran Khan, who led the study. (VOA)