Wednesday November 13, 2019
Home Lead Story Would You Giv...

Would You Give Up Digital Life if Given Lifetime Data Protection?

Many prefer not to have certain facts about themselves revealed in public

0
//
Digital, Life, Data
Several years ago, people shared their private information with social media services in exchange for various benefits, without even thinking about the potential threats. Pixabay

Would you give up your digital life if all your personal information – passwords, posts, pictures, videos, jokes, memes, GIFs etc – remain private for the rest of your life or given back to you, with no duplicate data saved in the Dark Web?

For four in 10 people (38 per cent), this is a steal deal as consumers’ personal information is becoming incredibly valuable to them, says a latest report from global cybersecurity firm Kaspersky.

Social media services like Facebook, Instagram or Twitter have become a significant part of our lives and according to Kaspersky’s report, 82 per cent of people now use them globally.

Several years ago, people shared their private information with social media services in exchange for various benefits, without even thinking about the potential threats and their consequences.

Digital, Life, Data
For four in 10 people (38 per cent), this is a steal deal as consumers’ personal information is becoming incredibly valuable. Pixabay

“With a rising number of data leaks around the world, we are seeing a new trend among consumers. Many prefer not to have certain facts about themselves revealed in public and are paying more attention to the information they share with online services,” says Marina Titova, Head of Consumer Product Marketing at Kaspersky.

However, the majority still don’t know how to protect their digital privacy and would give up social media to guarantee their information remains secure.

The truth is: Your data is up for grabs everywhere – be it tech companies, advertisers or marketers.

After facing flak for using unethical and discreet ways of collecting user-information, Facebook has now decided to pay Android users in India and the US just to monitor how they use their phones.

Also Read- How to Salvage Your Marriage from Divorce

The social networking giant has launched a new app called Study which is available for download on Google’s Play Store for Android users aged 18 and above.

The app would not only monitor installed apps on a person’s phone but also observe the amount of time spent on those apps along with details like the users’ location and additional app data which could reveal other specific features being used.

Earlier this year, it was revealed that Facebook was secretly paying users aged 13 to 35 up to $20 per month, plus referral fees, to install a “Facebook Research” Virtual Private Network (VPN) that was letting the company access user’s data.

According to Kaspersky’s report titled, “The true value of digital privacy: are consumers selling themselves short?”, fears surrounding protecting digital privacy have made consumers more anxious about the use and distribution of their personal information on the Internet.

Digital, Life, Data
Social media services like Facebook, Instagram or Twitter have become a significant part of our lives. Pixabay

However, despite these various benefits, some would still opt out of social media if it helped to restore their digital privacy forever.

One in 10 (12 per cent) people who give away their personal information to register for fun quizzes, such as what celebrity they look like or what their favourite meal is, would not be able to do so anymore.

It may be even more problematic, though, for 58 per cent people who would no longer be able to use their social login details to quickly and conveniently authorize themselves on different websites or services.

Perhaps even more surprisingly, at a time when the number of mobile phone users is rising 2 per cent year-on-year, one-in-five (19 per cent) would be ready to wave goodbye to their handsets altogether to guarantee their data remains private for the rest of their life.

Also Read- Give your Place a Bohemian Twist with Soft Furnishings

Unfortunately, even sacrificing your entire social media presence wouldn’t be sufficient to protect digital privacy an it’s a process, not a one-time deal that can be bargained for.

“Keeping personal information safe – by regularly updating social media account passwords and using security solutions – will give consumers more confidence in the security of their data online,” said Titova. (IANS)

Next Story

Hire Hackers To Safeguard Your Data

Here's how hiring hackers can help you safeguard your data

0
hackers
Hackers have become an invaluable extension of the most trusted security teams. Pixabay

At a time when cyber attacks on businesses across industries are multiplying as they go digital, joining hacker-powered bug bounty and vulnerability disclosure programmes is the key to minimise such incidents and safeguard your key data, a top cyber security officer said on Tuesday.

Hacker-powered security is a technique that utilises collaboration with the hacker community to find unknown security vulnerabilities and reduce security risk. Popular examples include bug bounty programmes and vulnerability disclosure policies.

“Hackers have become an invaluable extension of the most trusted security teams, on a mission to find what others may have missed or could not see,” Alex Rice, Chief Technology Officer, HackerOne told IANS.

San Francisco-based HackerOne is a vulnerability coordination and bug bounty platform that connects businesses with cybersecurity researchers.

It develops bug bounty solutions to help organizations reduce the risk of a security incident by working with the world’s largest community of ethical hackers.

hackers
Goldman Sachs is works with hackers to identify vulnerabilities in their consumer websites. Pixabay

Back in May 2018, Goldman Sachs became the first investment bank to launch a vulnerability disclosure policy.

“In the first year of their programme, more than 23 vulnerabilities, each representing real-world risk to their customers and data, were safely resolved,” Rice noted.

Today, Goldman Sachs is working with hackers to identify vulnerabilities in their consumer websites.

“On average, their internal security team has resolved vulnerability reports within two months, and have responded to bug reports in as little as one minute, further resolving reports within one hour,” said Rice who co-founded HackerOne in 2012.

Food delivery platform Zomato has paid more than $100,000 (over Rs 70 lakh) to 435 hackers to date for finding and fixing bugs on its platform.

With the help of HackerOne’s bug bounty programme since July 2017, Zomato has successfully resolved 775 vulnerabilities report.

“Zomato security team is tasked with protecting sensitive information for over 55 million unique monthly visitors,” said HackerOne.

Hackers are no longer anonymous guns-for-hire. They are being embraced by everyone — from the insurance industry to government agencies.

In August, HackerOne revealed that hackers earned $21 million in just a year reporting vulnerabilities via various bug bounty opportunities as governments’ efforts to fix malware increased a whopping 214 per cent globally.

According to Rice, research continues to show us that most breaches occur from basic lapses in security hygiene.

“It is important that organisations have layered defences, and use basic cyber hygiene principles such as multi-factor authentication and password best practices, followed by a security programme that focuses on covering your entire attack surface,” Rice told IANS.

Software is eating the world and software has bugs.

“All organisations — financial institutions, healthcare organisations, e-commerce companies, big box stores, media companies, practically anyone — are going digital and are equally at risk. We’re all in this together and are more alike than we realize,” he maintained.

Hackers
Zomato has paid more than $100,000 (over Rs 70 lakh) to 435 hackers to date for finding and fixing bugs on its platform. Pixabay

On the bright side, the number of hacker-powered security programmes is rapidly growing all over the world.

According to HackerOne’s “2019 Hacker-Powered Security Report”, Latin America saw record growth of 41 per cent over the previous year and Asia Pacific grew 30 per cent.

Today, six of the top 10 financial services organisations in North America, and companies like Goldman Sachs, PayPal and Lending Club, are working with HackerOne.

Rice said that in terms of vulnerabilities, it’s really important that organisations have an efficient system in place to identify vulnerabilities and apply patches in a timely manner.

“Unpatched machines are still the most common attack vector for cybercriminals. Outside of basic hygiene practices such as applying timely security updates, the most effective means of doing so is to leverage the power of the friendly hacker community or what we call ‘hacker-powered security’,” Rice noted.

To tackle cyber attacks from nation-state bad actors, government agencies around the world are launching bug bounty and vulnerability disclosure programmes – like the European Commission, the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre, Singapore’s Ministry of Defense, Singaporean Government Technology Agency, the US Department of Defense, including the Army, the Air Force and the Marine Corp.

Also Read- Cyber Threat Landscape To Worsen In 2020

In 2018, the number of hacker-powered security programmes in the federal government sector grew an impressive 214 per cent, according to HackerOne. (IANS)