Saturday February 16, 2019

Want To Know? Should You Wrap Your Food Items In Newspaper or Not?

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Bhelpuri served in Newspaper, Wikimedia

New Delhi, Dec 10, 2016: Wrapping food items in newspaper is bad for your health as its ink has multiple bioactive materials with known negative health effects, FSSAI said on Friday.

Wrapping food in newspapers is an unhealthy practice and the consumption of such food is injurious to health, even if the food has been cooked hygienically,” the Food, Safety and Standard Authority of India (FSSAI) said in an advisory.

“Printing inks may also contain harmful colours, pigments, binders, additives, and preservatives. Besides chemical contaminants, presence of pathogenic micro organisms in used newspapers also poses potential risk to human health,” the advisory said.

The advisory also said that even paper/cardboard boxes made of recycled paper may be contaminated with harmful chemicals like phthalate which can cause digestive problems and also lead to severe toxicity.

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“Older people, teenagers, children and people with compromised vital organs and immune systems are at a greater risk of acquiring cancer-related health complications, if they are exposed to food packed in such material,” the advisory warned.

The advisory comes after Health Minister J.P. Nadda’s directions to the food regulatory authority against the practice of wrapping and covering food items in newspapers in India.

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Speaking in this regard J.P Nadda said: “It has been observed that vendors have been using newspapers in packing and serving food, which is harmful. I urge the public to dissuade the vendors from doing so.”

According to the advisory, the Commissioners of Food Safety of all States/Union Territories will initiate systematic campaigns for generating awareness among all the stakeholders to discourage the use of newspapers for packing, serving and storing food items. (IANS)

Next Story

Do You Have A Sweet Tooth? Know How High-Calorie Desserts Can Lead to Healthier Meals

Choosing these high-calorie options first might help you opt for a healthier meal later, says a new research.

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We believe diners who chose the indulgent dessert first then picked healthier main and side dishes to make up for their high-calorie dessert. Pixabay

Do red velvet cheesecake, french fries or fish fries entice you but you refrain from eating those owing to the high-calories they contain? Take heart.

Choosing these high-calorie options first might help you opt for a healthier meal later, says a new research.

The study showed choosing indulgent dessert first may lead to eating lower-calorie meals.

“We believe diners who chose the indulgent dessert first then picked healthier main and side dishes to make up for their high-calorie dessert.

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Choosing these high-calorie options first might help you opt for a healthier meal later, says a new research. Pixabay

“Diners who picked the healthier dessert may have thought they already had done a good deed for their bodies so they deserved higher-calorie food further down the cafeteria line,” said Martin Reimann, Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona in the US.

The experiment was conducted in the cafeteria of the EGADE Business School at the Tecnológico de Monterrey in Monterrey, Mexico.

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Diners who picked the healthier dessert may have thought they already had done a good deed for their bodies. Pixabay

For the study, researchers included 134 diners aged between 18 and 60 with an average age of 32.

They placed either a healthy or less healthy dessert (fresh fruit versus lemon cheesecake).

There were also healthy and less healthy main and side dishes including grilled chicken fajitas and a small salad or fried fish and french fries.

Also Read: Lack Of Data Privacy Makes India Unprepared To Deal With Misuse of Technology
The findings, published by the American Psychological Association, showed that diners who chose the cheesecake first, were twice as likely to order the lighter main dish later and ultimately consumed fewer calories than diners who chose the fresh fruit first.

“People should be aware that their initial food choices and their mindset may affect the overall healthiness of their meals,” suggested Reimann. (IANS)