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Xiaomi, Amazon Devices get Hacked By Dual-Member Team of White-Hat Hackers

The duo, Cama and Zhu earned $60,000 for taking control of an Amazon Echo device using an integer overflow in JavaScript

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Additionally, the Hackers targeted the Xiaomi phone Mi 9 and earned them a reward of $20,000. Pixabay

A dual-member team of white-hat Hackers by the name of Fluoroacetate, hacked Amazon Echo speakers, Xiaomi Mi9, Samsung and Sony smart TVs at the Pwn2Own hacking contest here.

Team Fluoroacetate, comprising of members Amat Cama and Richard Zhu collected a bounty of $1,45,000 during the first day of the event, after successfully hacking these devices, Android police reported.

The hackers first targeted Sony’s X800G smart TV, using a Javascript OOB Read bug to exploit the television’s built-in web browser, by doing this the team earned $15,000.

The duo, Cama and Zhu earned $60,000 for taking control of an Amazon Echo device using an integer overflow in JavaScript.

Hackers
A dual-member team of white-hat Hackers by the name of Fluoroacetate, hacked Amazon Echo speakers, Xiaomi Mi9, Samsung and Sony smart TVs at the Pwn2Own hacking contest here. Pixabay

The two Samsung devices that they hacked were the Galaxy S10 smartphone and Q60 smart TV. This victory earned the team $45,000.

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Additionally, the duo targeted the Xiaomi phone Mi 9 and earned them a reward of $20,000. (IANS)

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Hackers Can Cause Serious Attacks On E-Bikes For Eavesdropping, Says Study

Someone with malicious intent could eavesdrop on these wireless channels and listen to data exchanges between the scooter and riders' smartphone app

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Vendors of Micromobility vehicles can also suffer denial-of-service (DoS) attacks and data leaks by hackers, said researchers from University of Texas at San Antonio. Pixabay

As governments including in India plan more e-bikes on roads to help tackle traffic congestion, like any Internet-connected device, hackers can cause a series of attacks in e-scooters, including eavesdropping on users and even spoof GPS systems to direct riders to unintended locations, warn researchers including some of Indian-origin.

Vendors of Micromobility vehicles can also suffer denial-of-service (DoS) attacks and data leaks, said researchers from University of Texas at San Antonio.

“We have identified and outlined a variety of weak points or attack surfaces in the current ride-sharing, or micromobility, ecosystem that could potentially be exploited by malicious adversaries right from inferring the riders’ private data to causing economic losses to service providers and remotely controlling the vehicles’ behaviour and operation,” said Jadliwala.

The micromobility e-scooter analysis was conducted by Jadliwala alongside graduate students Nisha Vinayaga-Sureshkanth, Raveen Wijewickrama and post-doctoral fellow Anindya Maiti.

The global e-Bike market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 9.01 per cent to reach $38.6 billion by 2025 from an estimated $21.1 billion in 2018, according to marketsandmarkets research firm. Computer science experts at the university have published the first review of the security and privacy risks posed by e-scooters and their related software services and applications.

According to the review, to appear in the proceedings of the 2nd ACM Workshop on Automotive and Aerial Vehicle Security (AutoSec 2020), hackers can cause a series of attacks. Some e-scooter models communicate with the rider’s smartphone over a Bluetooth Low Energy channel.

Someone with malicious intent could eavesdrop on these wireless channels and listen to data exchanges between the scooter and riders’ smartphone app by means of easily and cheaply accessible hardware and software tools such as Ubertooth and WireShark.

Those who sign up to use e-scooters also offer up a great deal of personal and sensitive data beyond just billing information.According to the study, providers automatically collect other analytics, such as location and individual vehicle information.

Hackers
As governments including in India plan more e-bikes on roads to help tackle traffic congestion, like any Internet-connected device, hackers can cause a series of attacks in e-scooters, including eavesdropping on users and even spoof GPS systems to direct riders to unintended locations. Pixabay

This data can be pieced together to generate an individual profile that can even include a rider’s preferred route, personal interests, and home and work locations.”Cities are experiencing explosive population growth. Micromobility promises to transport people in a more sustainable, faster and economical fashion,” said Jadliwala.

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To ensure that this industry stays viable, companies should think not only about rider and pedestrian safety but also how to protect consumers and themselves from significant cybersecurity and privacy threats enabled by this new technology,” the authors noted. (IANS)