Wednesday January 16, 2019
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Xiaomi to Fight Patent Dispute Against Coolpad

The lawsuit comes at a time when Xiaomi has officially filed for an IPO in Hong Kong that aims to raise $10 billion in a sale that may value the company at $100 billion.

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The complaint alleged that Xiaomi had used the patents without any license from Yulong.
Xiaomi to fight patent disput against Coolpad, wikimedia commons

As it prepares to file an initial public offering (IPO) in Hong Kong, Xiaomi has been named in a patent dispute in China by its rival Coolpad for three successful smartphone models — Mi Mix 2, Redmi Note 5 and Redmi 5 Plus.

In a regulatory filing, Hong Kong-listed Coolpad’s Yulong unit has initiated a patent infringement case against Xiaomi with the Jiangsu Province Nanjing Intermediate People’s Court, the South China Morning Post reported on Friday.

“Beijing-based Xiaomi has requested the Patent Re-examination Board, under China’s State Intellectual Property Office (SIPO), to invalidate three patent rights that Coolpad had claimed were infringed by the world’s fourth-largest smartphone supplier,” the report added.

The complaint alleged that Xiaomi had used the patents without any license from Yulong.

Coolpad also requested the court to order Xiaomi to pay “for the economic loss suffered” by Yulong and all litigation expenses.

According to a Xiaomi statement, it was made aware of the Yulong lawsuit after Coolpad filed a motion before the Shenzhen Intermediate People’s Court regarding the alleged patent infringements.

The lawsuit comes at a time when Xiaomi has officially filed for an IPO in Hong Kong that aims to raise $10 billion in a sale that may value the company at $100 billion.

At $10 billion, Xiaomi’s IPO would also be the 15th biggest of all time, or the fourth-largest in Hong Kong.

The complaint alleged that Xiaomi had used the patents without any license from Yulong.
CoolPad logo, wikimedia commons

According to the regulatory filing with the Hong Kong stock exchange, Xiaomi also reported a revenue of $18 billion and a gross profit of $2.3 billion in 2017.

The company is currently at the fourth position in the smartphone market globally, behind Samsung, Apple and Huawei.

In the first quarter of 2018, Xiaomi with over 51 per cent growth was at fifth spot in China, Counterpoint Research reported. Xiaomi was the fastest growing brand in China during the quarter.

Also Read: New Study Shows That Binaries From Globular Clusters Can be Detected by LISA

On the other hand, Coolpad is set to make a comeback with a new line-up of smartphones and accessories for the Indian market.

In January, the Shenzhen-based handset maker bid adieu to its financially-troubled Chinese partner LeEco.

It later announced a fresh investment of $300 million from Power Sun Ventures, a family trust. Chinese property mogul Chen Hua, Founder, and Head of the Kingkey Group, is leading the new investment through Power Sun Ventures. (IANS)

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China Exchanged Data With NASA On Its Recent Mission To Moon

The country has also said that it will welcome scientists and astronauts from around the world to make use of its space station, which is slated for completion by 2022.

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Wu Yanhua, deputy director of the national space agency, speaks during a press conference held in Beijing, China, Jan. 14, 2019. VOA

China exchanged data with NASA on its recent mission to land a Chinese spacecraft on the far side of the moon, the Chinese space agency said Monday, in what was reportedly the first such collaboration since an American law banned joint space projects with China that do not have prior congressional approval.

The space agency’s deputy director, Wu Yanhua, said NASA shared information about its lunar orbiter satellite in hopes of monitoring the landing of the Chang’e 4 spacecraft, which made China the first country to land on the far side of the moon earlier this month.

China in turn shared the time and coordinates of Chang’e 4’s scheduled landing, Wu told reporters during a briefing on the lunar mission. He added that while NASA’s satellite did not catch the precise moment of landing, it took photographs of the area afterward.

The state-run China Daily said that was the first such form of cooperation since the 2011 U.S. law was enacted.

Moon, China
The far side of the moon, photographed by the Chang’e-4 lunar probe, is seen in this image provided by China National Space Administration, Jan. 3, 2019. VOA

NASA has not published any statements on the collaboration and could not immediately be reached for comment.

The lunar mission by Chang’e 4 and its rover, Jade Rabbit 2, was a triumph for China’s growing space program, which has been rapidly catching up with those of Russia and the U.S. President Xi Jinping has placed space exploration among the country’s national development priorities and the far side mission offered a chance for China to do something not done before by any other country.

The far side of the moon – the side which faces away from Earth – posed a challenge for scientists because it is beyond radio signals’ reach. China set up a relay satellite in May to receive communication from Chang’e 4.

“In the past, we were always rushing to catch up to the advanced global standards” in space, said Wu Weiren, the chief designer of China’s lunar exploration project.

“There were many things to catch up on, and fewer things in which we could surpass others,” he said. “With the probe of the far side of the moon this time, Chinese people have done very well.”

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This picture taken Jan. 3, 2019, and received, Jan. 4, from the China National Space Administration (CNSA) via CNS shows a robotic lunar rover on the far side of the moon. VOA

Officials at the briefing declined to give specific figures on the costs of the space program.

Wu Yanhua said the Chang’e 4 was originally built as a “backup product” for Chang’e 3. He said the spending needed to refit it for its new objective was akin to repairing a short section of subway line.

Also Read: NASA Telescopes Capture Birth of Black Hole or Neutron Star

Around the end of this year, China plans to launch Chang’e 5, which is to collect and bring back samples from the near side of the moon, the first time that has been done since 1976. Scientists are still researching whether to send Chinese astronauts, Wu said.

The country has also said that it will welcome scientists and astronauts from around the world to make use of its space station, which is slated for completion by 2022. (VOA)