Tuesday March 19, 2019
Home Lead Story Xiaomi to Fig...

Xiaomi to Fight Patent Dispute Against Coolpad

The lawsuit comes at a time when Xiaomi has officially filed for an IPO in Hong Kong that aims to raise $10 billion in a sale that may value the company at $100 billion.

0
//
The complaint alleged that Xiaomi had used the patents without any license from Yulong.
Xiaomi to fight patent disput against Coolpad, wikimedia commons

As it prepares to file an initial public offering (IPO) in Hong Kong, Xiaomi has been named in a patent dispute in China by its rival Coolpad for three successful smartphone models — Mi Mix 2, Redmi Note 5 and Redmi 5 Plus.

In a regulatory filing, Hong Kong-listed Coolpad’s Yulong unit has initiated a patent infringement case against Xiaomi with the Jiangsu Province Nanjing Intermediate People’s Court, the South China Morning Post reported on Friday.

“Beijing-based Xiaomi has requested the Patent Re-examination Board, under China’s State Intellectual Property Office (SIPO), to invalidate three patent rights that Coolpad had claimed were infringed by the world’s fourth-largest smartphone supplier,” the report added.

The complaint alleged that Xiaomi had used the patents without any license from Yulong.

Coolpad also requested the court to order Xiaomi to pay “for the economic loss suffered” by Yulong and all litigation expenses.

According to a Xiaomi statement, it was made aware of the Yulong lawsuit after Coolpad filed a motion before the Shenzhen Intermediate People’s Court regarding the alleged patent infringements.

The lawsuit comes at a time when Xiaomi has officially filed for an IPO in Hong Kong that aims to raise $10 billion in a sale that may value the company at $100 billion.

At $10 billion, Xiaomi’s IPO would also be the 15th biggest of all time, or the fourth-largest in Hong Kong.

The complaint alleged that Xiaomi had used the patents without any license from Yulong.
CoolPad logo, wikimedia commons

According to the regulatory filing with the Hong Kong stock exchange, Xiaomi also reported a revenue of $18 billion and a gross profit of $2.3 billion in 2017.

The company is currently at the fourth position in the smartphone market globally, behind Samsung, Apple and Huawei.

In the first quarter of 2018, Xiaomi with over 51 per cent growth was at fifth spot in China, Counterpoint Research reported. Xiaomi was the fastest growing brand in China during the quarter.

Also Read: New Study Shows That Binaries From Globular Clusters Can be Detected by LISA

On the other hand, Coolpad is set to make a comeback with a new line-up of smartphones and accessories for the Indian market.

In January, the Shenzhen-based handset maker bid adieu to its financially-troubled Chinese partner LeEco.

It later announced a fresh investment of $300 million from Power Sun Ventures, a family trust. Chinese property mogul Chen Hua, Founder, and Head of the Kingkey Group, is leading the new investment through Power Sun Ventures. (IANS)

Next Story

Google Claims It Has “No Plans” To Relaunch A Search Engine in China

Technology companies have recently been a favorite target of many members of the U.S. Congress, who have criticized them over a wide range of issues such as privacy, work in China and allowing foreign meddling in U.S. elections.

0
Google
The Chinese flag is seen near the Google sign at the Google china headquarters in Beijing, China. VOA

The United States’ top general said on Thursday that the Chinese military was benefiting from the work Alphabet Inc’s Google was doing in China, where the technology giant has long sought to have a bigger presence.

“The work that Google is doing in China is indirectly benefiting the Chinese military,” Marine General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing.

“We watch with great concern when industry partners work in China knowing that there is that indirect benefit,” he said.

google
Lawmakers and Google employees have raised concerns the company would comply with China’s internet censorship and surveillance policies if it re-enters the Asian nation’s search engine market. Pixabay

“Frankly, ‘indirect’ may be not a full characterization of the way it really is, it is more of a direct benefit to the Chinese military.”

Last year Google said it was no longer vying for a $10 billion cloud computing contract with the U.S. Defense Department, in part because the company’s new ethical guidelines do not align with the project.

In June, Google said it would not renew a contract to help the U.S. military analyze aerial drone imagery when it expires, as the company sought to defuse an internal uproar over the deal.

At the same time, Google said it has “no plans” to relaunch a search engine in China, though it is continuing to study the idea.

During the hearing, Republican Senator Josh Hawley sharply criticized the tech company, referring to it as “a supposedly American company.”

FILE - Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., speaks during a hearing of a Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, March 6, 2019.
Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., speaks during a hearing of a Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, March 6, 2019. VOA

Technology companies have recently been a favorite target of many members of the U.S. Congress, who have criticized them over a wide range of issues such as privacy, work in China and allowing foreign meddling in U.S. elections.

Lawmakers and Google employees have raised concerns the company would comply with China’s internet censorship and surveillance policies if it re-enters the Asian nation’s search engine market.

Also Read: India and Pakistan Threaten to Release Missiles at Each Othe

Asked about Dunford’s comments, Google referred to previous statements.

Google Chief Executive Sundar Pichai has previously said the company has invested in China for years and plans to continue to do so, but that the company also was continuing to work with the U.S. government on projects in health care, cybersecurity and other fields. (VOA)