Monday January 20, 2020

Research Suggest Yo-yo Dieting Can Raise Women’s Heart Disease Risk

The more episodes of weight cycling women reported, the poorer they scored on 'Life's Simple 7', according to the researchers

0
//
Heart Disease
Even low exposure to arsenic, lead may up heart disease risk. Pixabay

Yo-yo dieting — weight cycling, or the cyclical loss and gain of weight — can make it harder for women to control a variety of heart disease risk factors, according to a research.

The study found in case of women losing at least 10 pounds and regaining the weight within a year could be detrimental to heart heath.

Besides achieving a healthy weight, maintaining a consistent body weight is important for lowering heart disease risks.

Earlier research showed similar results in men, with those who weight-cycled having twice the risk of cardiovascular death in middle age.

“Achieving a healthy weight is generally recommended as heart healthy but maintaining weight loss is difficult and fluctuations in weight may make it harder to achieve ideal cardiovascular health,” said Brooke Aggarwal, Assistant Professor at Columbia University in New York.

The results were presented at the American Heart Association’s EPI Lifestyle Scientific Sessions 2019 in Texas.

Many menopausal symptoms that you may aren't aware of can cause much harm to you.
Yo-yo dieting may raise women’s heart disease risk.

For the study, the team examined 485 women (average age 37 years, average body mass index 26, in the overweight range).

Women reported how many times (other than during pregnancies) they had lost at least 10 pounds, only to regain the weight within a year.

Most women (73 per cent) reported at least one episode of yo-yo weight loss, with a range of zero to 20 episodes.

Also Read- Gene Triggering Antibiotic Reaction Risk Identified, Says Study

They were assessed on American Heart Association’s ‘Life’s Simple 7’ — a measure of how well people control major heart disease risk factors, including body mass index, cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, smoking, physical activity and diet.

The more episodes of weight cycling women reported, the poorer they scored on ‘Life’s Simple 7’, according to the researchers. (IANS)

Next Story

Premature Menopause More Likely to Increase Health Problems After 60

Compared with women who experienced menopause at the age of 50-51 years, women with premature menopause were twice as likely to develop multimorbidity by the age of 60, and three times as likely to develop multimorbidity from the age of 60 onwards

0
Bone Health
Women who have already been through menopause may experience problems related to their bone health. Lifetime Stock

Women who experience premature menopause are almost three times more likely to develop multiple, chronic medical problems in their 60s, says a new study.

It is known already that premature menopause, occurring at the age of 40 or younger, is linked to a number of individual medical problems in later life, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

However, there is little information about whether there is also an association between the time of natural menopause and the development of multiple medical conditions known as multimorbidity.

For the findings, published in the journal Human Reproduction, researchers at the University of Queensland followed more than 5,000 women aged 45 to 50 from 1996 until 2016.

“We found that 71 per cent of women with premature menopause had developed multimorbidity by the age of 60 compared with 55 per cent of women who experienced menopause at the age of 50-51,” said study researcher Xiaolin Xu from Zhejiang University in China.

“In addition, 45 per cent of women with premature menopause had developed multimorbidity in their 60s compared with 40 per cent of women who experienced menopause at the age of 50-51,” Xu added.

The women responded to the first survey in 1996 and then answered questionnaires every three years (apart from a two-year interval between the first and second survey) until 2016.

Sexual Dysfunction increases by nearly 30 per cent during perimenopause and vaginal dryness most often has the greatest effect on desire, arousal and overall satisfaction, Here are some Causes. Wikimedia Commons

The women reported whether they had been diagnosed with or treated for any of 11 health problems in the past three years: diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, osteoporosis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression, anxiety or breast cancer.

Women were considered to have multimorbidity if they had two or more of these conditions.

During the 20 years of follow-up, 2.3 per cent of women experienced premature menopause and 55 per cent developed multimorbidity.

Also Read: Twitterati Report Server, Media Transfer Issues on WhatsApp

Compared with women who experienced menopause at the age of 50-51 years, women with premature menopause were twice as likely to develop multimorbidity by the age of 60, and three times as likely to develop multimorbidity from the age of 60 onwards.

“Our findings indicate that multimorbidity is common in mid-aged and early-elderly women,” said Indian-origin researcher and study senior author Gita Mishra.

“We also found that premature menopause is associated with a higher incidence of individual chronic conditions,” Xu added. (IANS)