Monday September 16, 2019

These 7 Yoga Practices Can Help You to Ease Your Wandering Mind and Enhance Concentration

Yoga is regarded as the ultimate healer for the soul and body

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Yoga
Yoga is known to be the ultimate healer for the soul and body. Pixabay
  • Practising yoga daily could develop greater agility, have a positive effect on your concentration, and altogether help you live a more fulfilling life
  • Yoga is a lot more than just an activity which molds your body; it has the intense impact on the human mind
  • It could steer the mind away from all distractions and calm it down completely

New Delhi, August 18, 2017: Yoga is known to heal the soul and body. It has an intense impact on your mind. It declutters one’s emotional health, fixes our mind, and helps one to overcome ailments, stress, etc.

The emotional clusters do not let one reach their full potential and negatively affect our mental being. Healthy bodies grant greater success in fields of our interests and pursuits at passions, work, hobbies, and with family. Practising yoga daily could develop greater abilities, have a positive effect on your concentration, and help you live a fulfilling and better life.

ALSO READ: Rishikesh: The World Capital of Yoga is in India

Referring to Patanjali, Yoga Chitta vritti nirodha, which conveys “yoga is the reduction of fluctuations of the mind.” Yoga has the ability to steer away all distractions and calm the mind down completely.

Listed below are some yoga asanas to boost one’s concentration and steer away distractions:

  • Prayer pose:
Yoga
It is a simple breathing exercise which provides a great way to begin your practice. Pixabay

* This pose inlcudes doing breathing exercise and provides a way to begin your yoga pratice.

* Sit on the floor with your legs crossed and make a prayer pose by folding your hands. Keep your spine straight and try to calm your mind down by concentrating on your breaths.

* Salutation seal aids in centering your focus and concentration and eases out your breathing.

  • Tadasana:
Yoga
Tadasana is also known as the mountain pose. Wikimedia

* Tadasana is also known as the Mountain Pose. It is regarded as the mother of all the yoga postures as they come from this base asana.

*  To begin with, stand barefoot on the floor with both your feet and legs together. Slightly bend the knees and then loosen the joints by straightening them.

* Breathe in. Now gently lift your toes and make an endeavor to balance the whole body using your heels. While balancing your whole body weight, Stretch your chest, shoulders, and arms upwards. Feel the stretch. Hold this posture for around five to ten seconds. Now gently exhale.

  • Pranayama:
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This formal practice includes controlling the breath, which is the source of our prana. Wikimedia

*This formal practice includes controlling your breath

* There are different pranayama types named in Hatha yoga, to improve concentration and build up the prana like nadishidhana pranayama, kumbhaka pranayama, among others.

  • Vrikshasana:
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This asana is basically a balancing pose. Pixabay

* This posture is similar to a strong and steady tree which requires balance.

* Its main advantages lie in improving the nervous system and balance.

* Stand upright with your knees absolutely straight and feet together and the arms resting at their respective sides. Now the first step is to raise the right foot. Hold its ankle using your right hand without letting your left knee bend. The joint at the knee is where your right leg will be folded. Inhale and lift your hands, in a joined position, gradually above your head. Stand straight and stretch yourself, maintaining your balance. While trying to balance this pose, look straight. Exhale and gradually bring your hands in the middle of your chest. Go back to the original position by slowly keeping the right leg down.

  • Natarajasana:
Yoga
It is named after the dancing avatar of Lord Shiva. Pixabay

* Natarajasana has been given its name after Nataraja, Lord Shiva’s dancing avatar and is also known as the dancing pose.

* It is one posture that will need time if one wants to master it.

* One must practice this posture for a minimum of 15 to 30 seconds.

  • Garudasana:
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The pose acquires its name from Garuda, the Hindu god, known for his focus, power, and strength. Wikimedia

* This asana acquires the name from Garuda, the Hindu god.

* Your hip and spine should be straight and shoulder should be pointing forward. Looking at a distance and breathing evenly will enable you to maintain your balancing.

* It helps you obtain strength and balance. It can take time to maintain balance or fully wrap your legs or hands. But never force yourself and your body into this posture.

  • Utrasana:
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It is also known as the camel pose. Wikimedia 

* Utrasana or the Camel Pose comprised of a bend in the backward direction that looks similar to a camel’s pose when one takes a sitting position.

* Ustrasana stretches and strengthens your shoulders and back and makes your posture better. It improves respiration, excretion, and digestion and relieves one from a backache. It balances and heals your chakras as well as stimulates your endocrine glands.

– prepared by Harsimran Kaur of NewsGram. Twitter @Hkaur1025

Next Story

How Americans Are Handling Post 9/11 Trauma

Eighteen years ago, more than 60% of Americans watched as the worst terror attack ever to occur on U.S. soil unfolded on television

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empire, state, building, us, 9/11, terrorism, safety
Covered in dust, ash and falling debris on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, New York City Transit's express coach #2185 could have been written off and sent off to scrap. It was decided, however, to rebuild her as a symbol of NYC Transit’s resiliency and a rolling example of the dedication of the agency’s employees. Wikimedia Commons

Eighteen years ago, more than 60% of Americans watched as the worst terror attack ever to occur on U.S. soil unfolded on television — either in real time or in repeated replays.

That up-close view of the murders of almost 3,000 people jolted Americans out of the sense of security they’d enjoyed at least since World War II.

“I think that up until that time, perhaps people were more optimistic or certainly had a sense that it couldn’t happen here. Terrorist attacks were something that happened overseas, but not in the United States on our soil,” says Roxane Cohen Silver, professor of psychological science at the University of California, Irvine.

“The concept of fearing violence on a day-to-day basis just wasn’t part of the existence of most people in the United States.”

Empire State building, US, New York, 9/11, trauma, mental health
TV viewers said the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack was the all-time most memorable moment shared by television viewers during the past 50 years, according to a 2012 study. VOA

Cohen Silver, who studies the impact of collective trauma, says some individuals with no direct connection to the 9/11 attacks exhibited symptoms that experts had previously assumed were the result of direct exposure to trauma.

“Individuals who watched a great deal of television in the first week after 9/11 were more likely to exhibit post-traumatic stress symptomatology and physical health ailments years later,” she says.

Those symptoms often included anxiety and fear, as well as the onset of physical health ailments such as cardiovascular issues.

“We learned from 9/11 that large-scale events could impact people beyond the directly affected communities, that the events that occurred in New York could impact people in Kansas,” Cohen Silver says. “The second message we’ve learned from 9/11 was the important role of the media in transmitting that awareness and that potential anxiety.”

Empire State building, US, New York, 9/11, trauma, mental health
Students and others watch live television coverage of the 9/11 attacks on the UCLA campus in Los Angeles, Sept. 11, 2001.
VOA

In the 18 years since 9/11, the rise of social media and smartphones has resulted in increased access to images of mass violence. In addition, there are no news editors or other middlemen to weed out potentially disturbing content. The speed with which these images reach people has also escalated.

Young Americans born after 9/11 have grown up in a world where acts of mass violence are increasingly commonplace.

More than 230 school shootings have occurred since 1999, when 13 people were killed at Columbine High School near Denver.

Mass attacks continue to occur in places that Americans commonly view as safe spaces, from the 2016 Orlando nightclub attack that killed 49; the 2017 Las Vegas concert shooting where 58 people were killed and hundreds more wounded; to last month’s shooting at a Texas Walmart that left 22 people dead.

ALSO READ: Chennai Experiences Most Cyber Attacks Among Metro Cities

“We’re so consumed with new events, you know, current events, hurricanes, mass violence events. And there are many of these that occur, and they’re all tragic,” says Cohen Silver. “But the psychological effects of September 11, 2019, cannot be directly linked to the 9/11 attacks without considering all of the rest of the things that have occurred.”

While the average American cannot control the violence around them, they can protect their mental health by not inundating themselves with images of the tragedies, which can be psychologically unhealthy.

“I believe that people can be informed without becoming immersed in the media. There’s no obvious benefit to repeated exposure to images and sounds of tragedy,” says Cohen Silver. “And so, once people are informed, I would say to practice caution in the amount of media attention that they engage and the amount of media exposure that they engage in.” (VOA)