Wednesday October 17, 2018

Yogatomics Training and Wellness Centre in Stonington, USA Uses Healing Sound to Bring Twist in Traditional Yoga Practices

James Conlan has brought therapeutic yoga, done in an anti-gravitational trapeze

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Cleanse the mind with yoga
Cleanse the mind with yoga. Pixabay
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  • James Conlan produces percussion-based healing sounds called thermoacoustics
  • Hot yoga is performed in a room heated to 90 degrees with 40 to 60% humidity
  • They need to purge and cleanse and surrender a little bit

Mystic, Stonington, Connecticut, USA, August 19, 2017:  James Conlan, the owner of Yogatomics Training and Wellness Center in Mystic village which is in the town called Stonington. It is revolutionizing the way people do traditional yoga. He specializes in therapeutic yoga which is done with the help of an anti-gravitational trapeze. He produces percussion-based, healing sounds that he calls ‘theracoustics’, which vibrate through the body during practice. It’s a whole new way of practicing it, literally turning oneself upside down and can prove to be more beneficial as well.

He is a percussionist and teaches classes with about 40 different instruments. According to The Westerly Sun report, Conlan said: “When people are on their mats practicing, I’m playing the singing bowl or the djembe or a shaker instrument or something that correlates with what’s happening in the classroom, and they can feel the vibration through their bodies in different yoga postures.” The djembe is a goblet-shaped drum.

ALSO READ: Here’s how the Science links Yoga to Happiness!

Yogatomics Training and Wellness was opened by Conlan, 49, in 2015 in collaboration with Mystic Shala Yoga. The two studios have separate entrances, one is in the front and another one in the back of 80 Stonington Road in Mystic and the spaces connect with a 4,000-square-foot complex on the second floor that includes a large outdoor deck. Amy Zezulka, the owner of the shala, is also Conlan’s wife, and he helped her to design and build her yoga studio, where he also teaches.

The shala began in 2006, is an official Baptiste Studio following the tenets of the Baron Baptiste Power Vinyasa method (a type of hot yoga performed in a room heated to 90 degrees with 40 to 60% humidity).

“People feel cleaner, more detoxified after a hot, sweaty yoga class. It also challenges the mind more because you’re thinking, oh my god, I’m sweating, oh my god, it’s so hot in here — we’re really working on calming our minds in the practice,” he said.

Conlan has studied with Baron Baptiste (is a yoga instructor, has trained extensively in all the major traditions of yoga) for five years, it began in 2008. He probably has about over 1,000 hours directly with Baron Baptiste and has thousands and thousands of hours teaching. That’s not all; he also practices and teaches meditation.

ALSO READ: Benefits of Trikonasana: Channeling Inner Strength, Stamina, and Stability With Yoga

He calls Yogatomics, which has an atomic-style logo design- the arts and sciences division of the shala, with om in the middle.

Conlan said, “I teach teacher training over here, we have meditation over here, hand-drumming, the yoga trapeze, massage therapy. It’s there to provide more service to our existing clients at Mystic Yoga Shala but also to introduce a whole new client base with the services that we offer like we have the cool temperature, more gentle classes, and the meditation aspect.” They provide a well-balanced space to their clients.

Yoga is an antidote to the fast pace of today’s technology
Yoga is an antidote to the fast pace of today’s technology. Pixabay

Conlan said he discovered his passion for yoga after bartending for 13 years at Mohegan Sun. He was one of the original employees in 1996. “I was there for so long but I was tired of the lifestyle, tired of being inside in that environment, I’m more of nature’s child,” he said. Before that, he served four years in the U.S. Air Force as an avionics technician. He said that yoga is an antidote to the fast pace of today’s technology.

Conlan said that in our age of information and digital world, it’s very important to maintain a barefoot practice because the pace of the world is moving so fast and a lot of people are being drawn to this practice because they can’t keep up with all the information their mind is trying to absorb. They need to purge and cleanse and surrender a little bit and that’s what this practice is all about.

All the people who want to learn yoga from him, his advice to them- “Just drop your fear and walk in the door for the first time, put out your hand and say hello.” It’s that easy to take the first step towards the healthier you. He said that fear is the most challenging part of any yoga practice. “Most people fear what they don’t understand and that fear is what keeps them from trying something new. The whole point of this practice is to shed that fear and the first step is to walk in the door and get on a yoga mat,” Conlan said.

– prepared by Kritika Dua of NewsGram. Twitter @DKritika08


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New Study Shows Link Between Meditation And Greater Focus

Supplementation, a healthy diet, and daily exercise are key, with recent studies showing that aerobic exercise also increases brain size.

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Pranayamic breathing is just one way to improve brain health.

Pranayamic breathing – an important part of yoga and meditation – has a unique ability to strengthen our focus and a new study by Trinity College Dublin has unlocked its secret. The researchers note that pranayamic breathing affects the levels of a natural chemical in the brain called noradrenaline. The latter is released when we are challenged, curious, focused, or emotionally excited. When present at the right levels, noradrenaline helps the brain grow new connections and helps us concentrate better on important tasks.

The old masters were on the right track

The researchers noted: “Practitioners of yoga have claimed for some 2,500 years, that respiration influences the mind. We looked for a neurophysiological link that could help explain these claims.” The researchers did so by measuring breathing, reaction time, and brain activity in a small area in the brainstem called the locus coeruleus, where noradrenaline is made. Noradrenaline is affected by stress; when we are worried or anxious we produce too much, and cannot concentrate. When we feel lazy, on the other hand, we produce too little and once again, focus is lost. One way to boost levels is through yoga; another method which can complement the latter is the consumption of medical grade focus supplements, which contain compounds such as octopamine (which has a similar effect to noradrenaline).

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Conversely, those with lower mindfulness ratings had greater activation of this part of the brain and also felt more pain. Pixabay

Pranayamic breathing aces the right balance

In the above study, researchers noted that brain activity in the part of the brain where noradrenaline is produced raises slightly when we inhale and drops slightly as we exhale. Thus, balance is achieved and we can focus on what we have set out to do. Pranayama not only boosts concentration but also produces “changes in arousal, attention, and emotional control that can be of great benefit to the meditator.”

What is Pranayamic breathing?

Pranayamic breathing involves controlling and extending breath, with a view to manipulating your vital energy, battling stress, and improving your mood. It is often used in meditation and yoga and interestingly, many yoga experts rank pranayama as even more important than asanas (the postures performed in a yoga session). In yogic tradition, breath is said to carry a person’s life force. Interestingly, scientific studies back this assertion to the extent that pranayamic breathing is able to boost brain function and change the actual structure of the brain. In recent studies, pranayamic breathing has been found to lower or stabilize blood pressure, lower stress, and reduce anxiety and depression.

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In order to comprehend better the Indian seers constructed the special “BOAT” – named Yoga/Meditation.

Implications of the study for aging

The researchers are excited that their findings could signal a way to prevent brain aging. They stated that if brains typically lose mass as we age, practices such as pranayamic breathing greatly reduce the rate of brain shrinkage, thus potentially helping keep dementia and related diseases at bay. Because keeping noradrenaline levels at an optimal level can help the brain grow new connections, meditation is an ideal activity to pursue.

Pranayamic breathing is just one way to improve brain health. Supplementation, a healthy diet, and daily exercise are key, with recent studies showing that aerobic exercise also increases brain size. To make the most of the effect of breathing on focus, consider joining a yoga class or learning the essence of pranayamic breathing online or through an app like Prana Breath or Universal Breathing.