Friday February 28, 2020

Here’s Why Yogurt Consumption May Help in Avoiding Breast Cancer Risk

Several studies have shown that the consumption of yoghurt is associated with a reduction in the risk of breast cancer

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Cancer
Scientists from Lancaster University said their idea -- as yet unproven -- is supported by the available evidence, which is that bacterial induced inflammation is linked to cancer. Pixabay

Eating natural yogurt daily may lesson breast cancer risk owing to lactose fermenting bacteria which reduces inflammation triggered by harmful bacteria, say researchers.

Yoghurt contains beneficial lactose-fermenting bacteria commonly found in milk, similar to the bacteria — or microflora 00 found in the breasts of mothers who have breastfed.

Scientists from Lancaster University said their idea — as yet unproven — is supported by the available evidence, which is that bacterial induced inflammation is linked to cancer.

“There is a simple, inexpensive potential preventive remedy; which is for women to consume natural yoghurt on a daily basis,” the authors wrote in a paper appeared in the journal Medical Hypotheses.

“We now know that breast milk is not sterile and that lactation alters the microflora of the breast,” said Dr Rachael Rigby from Lancaster University’s Faculty of Health and Medicine.

“Lactose fermenting bacteria are commonly found in milk and are likely to occupy the breast ducts of women during lactation and for an unknown period after lactation,” Rigby added.

Raspberries, Yogurt, Nature, Fresh, Breakfast, Pink
Eating natural yogurt daily may lesson breast cancer risk owing to lactose fermenting bacteria which reduces inflammation triggered by harmful bacteria, say researchers. Pixabay

The researchers suggest that lactose-fermenting bacteria in the breast is protective because each year of breast-feeding reduces the risk of breast cancer by 4.3 per cent.

Several studies have shown that the consumption of yoghurt is associated with a reduction in the risk of breast cancer, which the researchers suggest may be due to the displacement of harmful bacteria by beneficial bacteria.

There are approximately 10 billion bacterial cells in the human body and while most are harmless, some bacteria create toxins that trigger inflammation in the body.

Chronic inflammation destroys the harmful germs but it also damages the body.

One of the most common inflammatory conditions is gum disease or periodontitis which has already been linked to oral, oesophageal, colonic, pancreatic, prostatic and breast cancer.

Yogurt, Fruit, Vanilla, Strawberries, Food, Healthy
Yoghurt contains beneficial lactose-fermenting bacteria commonly found in milk, similar to the bacteria — or microflora 00 found in the breasts of mothers who have breastfed. Pixabay

“The stem cells which divide to replenish the lining of the breast ducts are influenced by the microflora, and certain components of the microflora have been shown in other organs, such as the colon and stomach, to increase the risk of cancer development,” said the researchers.

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“Therefore a similar scenario is likely to be occurring in the breast, whereby resident microflora impact on stem cell division and influence cancer risk,” they added. (IANS)

Next Story

Coronavirus in Iran Leads to Economic Decline

Iranian Economy Faces Setback on Coronavirus Concerns

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Iran coronavirus
Spread of the coronavirus in Iran has pushed that country's currency to lows not seen in almost a year. Pixabay

By Edward Yeranian

Arab media are reporting that the spread of the coronavirus in Iran has pushed that country’s currency to lows not seen in almost a year. Iranian health officials say there are more than 200 confirmed cases in the country, and at least 26 deaths.

Turkey, Armenia, Oman, Bahrain, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates have all closed land and air borders with Iran in recent days, due to the coronavirus.

As the closures stop the flow of traffic to and from Iran, fears of a deepening economic slump are hitting Iran’s national currency, the riyal.

Arab media say the riyal fell to 158,500 to the dollar on the black market Wednesday, its lowest level in over a year. The riyal’s official peg is 42,000 to the dollar.

Iran coronavirus
As the closures stop the flow of traffic to and from Iran, fears of a deepening economic slump are hitting Iran’s national currency, the riyal. Pixabay

Many economists fear that both Iran’s oil and non-oil exports will be hit by a regional trade slump due to the virus. Religious tourism to Iran’s holy sites will also be affected by border closures and quarantines around public places. Sales during the normally robust pre-Nowrouz new year’s festival are falling.

Despite the downward pressure on Iran’s economy, President Hassan Rouhani told journalists Thursday that the country, until recently, had been thriving.

He said that both industry and agriculture did very well during the past several months. He added that the economy will flourish if Iranians do not let U.S. sanctions or the coronavirus have a psychological impact on their behavior.

Iran coronavirus
Women wear masks to protect themselves against the coronavirus, as they cross a street in Tehran, Iran. VOA

Despite the president’s optimism, state TV showed Iranians in the capital, Tehran, swarming a pharmacy in the pursuit of flu medication and face masks. Panic-buying was also reported at some other businesses.

Former Iranian President Abolhassan Bani Sadr told VOA that “almost everything necessary to fight the virus outbreak is missing in Iran,” and ordinary people “blame their government and U.S. sanctions for the current crisis.”

He added that the Iranian economy depends on trade with its neighbors, so one can just imagine the poverty Iranians face if trade diminishes with partners like Turkey, Iraq, Russia and elsewhere.

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An Iranian member of parliament recently blamed Tehran’s eagerness to come to the rescue of its major trading partner, China, for shortages inside his own country. Iran sent thousands of face masks to China during the initial phase of the coronavirus outbreak, and now faces a severe shortage at home.

“Iranians,” laments former President Bani Sadr, “now have no confidence in the regime or its propaganda, and even less faith that the outside world will come to their rescue.” (VOA)