Wednesday March 20, 2019

Eating Yogurt May Reduce Risk Of Heart Diseases

For the study, published in American Journal of Hypertension, researchers included over 55,000 women aged between 30-55 with high blood pressure from the Nurses' Health Study and 18,000 men aged between 40-75 who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study

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Higher yogurt intake in women was associated with a 16 percent lower risk of undergoing revascularization. Pixabay

Higher intake of yogurt may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease among hypertensive men and women, a new study suggests.

According to the researchers, clinical trials have previously demonstrated beneficial effects of dairy consumption on cardiovascular health. Yogurt may independently be related to cardiovascular disease risk.

“Our results provide important new evidence that yogurt may benefit heart health alone or as a consistent part of a diet rich in fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, and whole grains,” said co-author of the study Justin R. Buendia from the Boston University School of Medicine in the US.

ALSO READ: Worried About Your Heart’s Health? Make These 5 Spices a Part of Your Diet and See the Benefits Yourself!

For the study, published in American Journal of Hypertension, researchers included over 55,000 women aged between 30-55 with high blood pressure from the Nurses’ Health Study and 18,000 men aged between 40-75 who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.

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In the Nurses’ Health Study, participants were asked to complete a mailed 61-item questionnaire in 1980 to report usual dietary intake in the preceding year. Pixabay

Participants subsequently reported any interim physician-diagnosed events including myocardial infarction, stroke, and revascularization.

The researchers found that higher intakes of yogurt were associated with a 30 percent reduction in risk of myocardial infarction among the Nurses’ Health Study women and a 19 percent reduction in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study men.

There were 3,300 and 2,148 total cardiovascular disease cases (myocardial infarction, stroke, and revascularization) in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, respectively, the researchers said.

ALSO READ: 4 Ways to Beat the Risk of Heart Attack in your 30s

In both groups, participants consuming more than two servings a week of yogurt had an approximately 20 percent lower risks of major coronary heart disease or stroke during the follow-up period.

When revascularization was added to the total cardiovascular disease outcome variable, the risk estimates were reduced for both men and women but remained significant.

Higher yogurt intake in combination with an overall heart-healthy diet was associated with greater reductions in cardiovascular disease risk among hypertensive men and women, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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Heart Strokes No More Disease of Just Elders, Now As Likely Among Young Adults

While the traditional risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, family history of premature heart attack and high cholesterol, substance abuse, including marijuana and cocaine were more the reason behind the increased heart attacks in younger patients.

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The study compared people aged 41-50 years and 40 or younger heart attack survivors and found that among patients who suffer a heart attack at a young age overall is 40 or younger. VOA

A heart attack, known earlier as a disease of the old, is now strikingly common in people aged 40 and below, finds a study.

The study compared people aged 41-50 years and 40 or younger heart attack survivors and found that among patients who suffer a heart attack at a young age overall is 40 or younger.

In addition, the proportion of people below 40 having a heart attack has been increasing, rising by 2 per cent each year for the last 10 years.

“It used to be incredibly rare to see anyone under age 40 come in with a heart attack and some of these people are now in their 20s and early 30s,” said Ron Blankstein, Associate Professor at Harvard University.

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Good habits like avoiding tobacco, regular exercise, heart healthy diet, weight loss if required, managing blood pressure and cholesterol, controlling diabetes if required, and staying away from substance abuse need to be maintained for a good heart. pixabay

Importantly, youngest heart attack survivors have the same likelihood of dying from another heart attack or stroke as survivors over 10 years older.

While the traditional risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, family history of premature heart attack and high cholesterol, substance abuse, including marijuana and cocaine were more the reason behind the increased heart attacks in younger patients.

The findings will be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session in New Orleans.

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While the traditional risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, family history of premature heart attack and high cholesterol, substance abuse, including marijuana and cocaine were more the reason behind the increased heart attacks in younger patients. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers included a total of 2,097 young patients.

Also Read: President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador’s Administration Described As The “Fourth Transformation” of Mexico

They found that the group below 40 had more spontaneous coronary artery dissection — a tear in the vessel wall, which tends to be more common in women, especially during pregnancy.

Good habits like avoiding tobacco, regular exercise, heart healthy diet, weight loss if required, managing blood pressure and cholesterol, controlling diabetes if required, and staying away from substance abuse need to be maintained for a good heart, Blankstein suggested. (IANS)