Tuesday November 20, 2018

Eating Yogurt May Reduce Risk Of Heart Diseases

For the study, published in American Journal of Hypertension, researchers included over 55,000 women aged between 30-55 with high blood pressure from the Nurses' Health Study and 18,000 men aged between 40-75 who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study

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Higher yogurt intake in women was associated with a 16 percent lower risk of undergoing revascularization. Pixabay
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Higher intake of yogurt may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease among hypertensive men and women, a new study suggests.

According to the researchers, clinical trials have previously demonstrated beneficial effects of dairy consumption on cardiovascular health. Yogurt may independently be related to cardiovascular disease risk.

“Our results provide important new evidence that yogurt may benefit heart health alone or as a consistent part of a diet rich in fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, and whole grains,” said co-author of the study Justin R. Buendia from the Boston University School of Medicine in the US.

ALSO READ: Worried About Your Heart’s Health? Make These 5 Spices a Part of Your Diet and See the Benefits Yourself!

For the study, published in American Journal of Hypertension, researchers included over 55,000 women aged between 30-55 with high blood pressure from the Nurses’ Health Study and 18,000 men aged between 40-75 who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.

yogurt
In the Nurses’ Health Study, participants were asked to complete a mailed 61-item questionnaire in 1980 to report usual dietary intake in the preceding year. Pixabay

Participants subsequently reported any interim physician-diagnosed events including myocardial infarction, stroke, and revascularization.

The researchers found that higher intakes of yogurt were associated with a 30 percent reduction in risk of myocardial infarction among the Nurses’ Health Study women and a 19 percent reduction in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study men.

There were 3,300 and 2,148 total cardiovascular disease cases (myocardial infarction, stroke, and revascularization) in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, respectively, the researchers said.

ALSO READ: 4 Ways to Beat the Risk of Heart Attack in your 30s

In both groups, participants consuming more than two servings a week of yogurt had an approximately 20 percent lower risks of major coronary heart disease or stroke during the follow-up period.

When revascularization was added to the total cardiovascular disease outcome variable, the risk estimates were reduced for both men and women but remained significant.

Higher yogurt intake in combination with an overall heart-healthy diet was associated with greater reductions in cardiovascular disease risk among hypertensive men and women, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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Weight Lifting Proven Better Than Walking And Cycling To Keep Heart Diseases At Bay

For the study, the researchers included 4,086 adults aged 21 to 44 or over 45

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Weight Lifting
Weightlifting better than walking and cycling for heart: Study. Pixabay

While it is well known that physical activities promote heart health, a new study suggests that weightlifting, rather than walking and cycling, can better help keep heart diseases at bay.

The study showed that engaging in both static activities such as strength training and dynamic activities like walking and cycling was associated with 30 to 70 per cent lower rates of cardiovascular disease risk factors.

But, the associations were strongest for strength training among youth than older adults.

“Both strength training and aerobic activity appeared to be heart healthy, even in small amounts, at the population level,” said Maia P. Smith, Assistant Professor at St. George’s University in Grenada.

“However, static activity appeared more beneficial than dynamic,” Smith added.

Lift Weights
Lift Weights. Pixabay

Further, the researchers suggested that clinicians should counsel patients, especially the elderly, to exercise regardless of activity types as patients who did both types of physical activity fared better than patients who simply increased the level of one type of activity.

“The important thing is to make sure they are engaging in physical activity,” Smith said.

The findings were presented at the ACC Latin America Conference 2018 in Peru.

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For the study, the researchers included 4,086 adults aged 21 to 44 or over 45.

The team analysed cardiovascular risk factors, such as high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes and high cholesterol, as a function of self-reported static and/or dynamic activity. (IANS)