Friday July 20, 2018

Eating Yogurt May Reduce Risk Of Heart Diseases

For the study, published in American Journal of Hypertension, researchers included over 55,000 women aged between 30-55 with high blood pressure from the Nurses' Health Study and 18,000 men aged between 40-75 who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study

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Higher yogurt intake in women was associated with a 16 percent lower risk of undergoing revascularization. Pixabay
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Higher intake of yogurt may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease among hypertensive men and women, a new study suggests.

According to the researchers, clinical trials have previously demonstrated beneficial effects of dairy consumption on cardiovascular health. Yogurt may independently be related to cardiovascular disease risk.

“Our results provide important new evidence that yogurt may benefit heart health alone or as a consistent part of a diet rich in fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, and whole grains,” said co-author of the study Justin R. Buendia from the Boston University School of Medicine in the US.

ALSO READ: Worried About Your Heart’s Health? Make These 5 Spices a Part of Your Diet and See the Benefits Yourself!

For the study, published in American Journal of Hypertension, researchers included over 55,000 women aged between 30-55 with high blood pressure from the Nurses’ Health Study and 18,000 men aged between 40-75 who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.

yogurt
In the Nurses’ Health Study, participants were asked to complete a mailed 61-item questionnaire in 1980 to report usual dietary intake in the preceding year. Pixabay

Participants subsequently reported any interim physician-diagnosed events including myocardial infarction, stroke, and revascularization.

The researchers found that higher intakes of yogurt were associated with a 30 percent reduction in risk of myocardial infarction among the Nurses’ Health Study women and a 19 percent reduction in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study men.

There were 3,300 and 2,148 total cardiovascular disease cases (myocardial infarction, stroke, and revascularization) in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, respectively, the researchers said.

ALSO READ: 4 Ways to Beat the Risk of Heart Attack in your 30s

In both groups, participants consuming more than two servings a week of yogurt had an approximately 20 percent lower risks of major coronary heart disease or stroke during the follow-up period.

When revascularization was added to the total cardiovascular disease outcome variable, the risk estimates were reduced for both men and women but remained significant.

Higher yogurt intake in combination with an overall heart-healthy diet was associated with greater reductions in cardiovascular disease risk among hypertensive men and women, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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Low Fat Diets do not Curb Heart Disease

However, a recent data shows that replacing saturated fats and trans fatty acids with omega 6 fatty acids, without a corresponding rise in omega 3 fatty acids, seems to increase the risk of death from coronary heart and cardiovascular diseases

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The best diet to boost and maintain heart health is one low in refined carbohydrates, sugars and processed foods. Pixabay

In a setback to those who have switched to low-saturated fat diets for better heart health, a leading US cardiovascular research scientist has claimed diets low in saturated fat or based on Omega 6 fats do not curb heart disease risk or help you live longer.

“Current dietary advice to replace saturated fats with carbohydrates or omega 6-rich polyunsaturated fats is based on flawed and incomplete data from the 1950s,” declared James DiNicolantonio in the medical journal Open Heart.

The best diet to boost and maintain heart health is one low in refined carbohydrates, sugars and processed foods, he recommended.

Anyone who has had a heart attack should not be thinking of replacing saturated fats with refined carbs or omega 6 fatty acids — particularly those found in processed vegetable oils containing large amounts of corn or safflower oil, he added.

“Dietary guidelines should be urgently reviewed and the vilification of saturated fats stopped to save lives,” he insisted.

DiNicolantonio said the idea that fat causes heart disease was based on a flawed 1950s study which used data from six countries but excluded data from another 16.

This study “seemingly led us down the wrong ‘dietary road’ for decades to follow”, he said.

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In the race to cut saturated fat intake, several dietary guidelines recommend upping polyunsaturated fat intake. Pixabay

There is now a strong argument in favour of the consumption of refined carbohydrates as the causative dietary factor behind the surge in obesity and diabetes in the US.

While a low fat diet may lower ‘bad’ (LDL) cholesterol, there are two types of LDL cholesterol.

“Switching to carbs may increase pattern B (small dense) LDL which is more harmful to heart health than pattern A (large buoyant) LDL, as well as creating a more unfavourable overall lipid profile,” DiNicolantonio noted.

In the race to cut saturated fat intake, several dietary guidelines recommend upping polyunsaturated fat intake.

Also Read: Stem Cell Thearpy To Treat Heart-Failure

However, a recent data shows that replacing saturated fats and trans fatty acids with omega 6 fatty acids, without a corresponding rise in omega 3 fatty acids, seems to increase the risk of death from coronary heart and cardiovascular diseases.

“We need a public health campaign as strong as the one we had in the 70s and 80s demonising saturated fats, to say that we got it wrong,” urged DiNicolantonio.

“Eating a Mediterranean-style diet rich in fruit, veg, pulses and fish would help lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of coronary heart disease,” he suggested. (IANS)