Sunday January 19, 2020

You can Develop Intelligence, so Take it Easy

The authors suggested that students with changeable mindset may proactively solve their problems, for instance by talking with teachers or improving their skills, thereby allowing them to cope more effectively the next day

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To reach this conclusion, the team surveyed 499 ninth-grade high school students during their first semester, and assessed their perceptions of intelligence. (IANS)

If you think you can’t do anything about your intelligence as this is something that can’t be changed, check your stress levels as this may harm your studies.

According to the scientists, students’ mindset about intelligence that whether it is a fixed trait or can be developed is associated with the likelihood of overcoming the stressful transition into high school, particularly if their grades begin to drop.

The study showed that bad grades did not indicate a higher stress response for everyone instead indicated greater responses in students who had more of a fixed mindset — the idea that people’s intelligence is fixed and cannot change.

The authors suggested that students with changeable mindset may proactively solve their problems, for instance by talking with teachers or improving their skills, thereby allowing them to cope more effectively the next day.

“Declining grades may get ‘under the skin,’ as it were, for first-year high school students who believe intelligence is a fixed trait,” said lead author Hae Yeon Lee from University of Texas at Austin in the US.

“But believing, instead, that intelligence can be developed — or having what is called a growth mindset– may buffer the effects of academic stress,” Lee added.

To reach this conclusion, the team surveyed 499 ninth-grade high school students during their first semester, and assessed their perceptions of intelligence.

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Representational image.

The levels of cortisol — a “toxic stress” hormone secreted by the body — was measured through saliva sampling.

The findings, published in the journal Child Development showed that 68 per cent of students experienced a decline in grades during the first 12 weeks.

Further analysis showed that these students also indicated that they could not handle the stress they were facing daily. Even if their grades were fine, they reported feeling “dumb” on almost 31 per cent of the days.

Also Read: New Algorithm That May Predict Your Intelligence

Students with fixed mindsets who reported feeling stressed continued to show high levels of stress even on the following day.

Whereas those with growing mindsets showed a strong response on the day they reported feeling stressed but returned to normal the following day.

“If not addressed, early academic adversity during school transition periods could contribute to lasting educational gaps in school engagement, drop-out rates and college enrollment,” said co-author David Yeager, professor at the university. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s how MRI may Predict Intelligence Level in Children

MRI may predict intelligence level in children

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Researchers have found that MRI scanning can help predict the intelligence level in children. Pixabay

Researchers have used ensemble methods based on deep learning 3D analysis networks to answer the global Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) prevision challenge for children.

Importantly, they made predictions for both the fluid intelligence level and the target variable independent from age, gender, brain size or MRI scanner used.

MRI is a common technique used to obtain images of human internal organs and tissues. Scientists wondered whether the intelligence level can be predicted from an MRI brain image.

“Our team develops deep learning methods for computer vision tasks in MRI data analysis, amongst other things,” said study researcher Ekaterina Kondratyev from Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) in Russia.

“In this study, we applied ensembles of classifiers to 3D of super precision neural networks: with this approach, one can classify an image as it is, without first reducing its dimension and, therefore, without losing valuable information,” said Kondratyeva.

The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) database contains a total of over 11,000 structural and functional MRI images of children aged 9-10.

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MRI is a common technique used to obtain images of human internal organs and tissues. Pixabay

In 2013, NIH launched the first grand-scale study of its kind in adolescent brain research, Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development, to see if and how teenagers’ hobbies and habits affect their further brain development.

NIH scientists launched an international competition, making the enormous NIH database available to a broad community for the first time ever.

The participants were given a task of building a predictive model based on brain images.

As part of the competition, the Skoltech team applied neural networks for MRI image processing.

To do this, they built a network architecture enabling several mathematical models to be applied to the same data in order to increase the prediction accuracy, and used a novel ensemble method to analyse the MRI data.

In their recent study, Skoltech researchers focused on predicting the intelligence level, or the so called “fluid intelligence”, which characterises the biological abilities of the nervous system and has little to do with acquired knowledge or skills.

Importantly, they made predictions for both the fluid intelligence level and the target variable independent from age, gender, brain size or MRI scanner used.

Also Read- Severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder Varies Among Twins: Study

The results of the study helped find the correlation between the child’s “fluid intelligence” and brain anatomy.

Although the prediction accuracy is less than perfect, the models produced during this competition will help shed light on various aspects of cognitive, social, emotional and physical development of adolescents. (IANS)