Tuesday September 17, 2019

Young Kids, Who Grow Up in Homes with Limited Access to Nutritious Foods Likely to Experience Poor Health

For the findings, published in the journal Pediatrics, the researchers analysed data from 28,184 racially and ethnically diverse children

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Young Kids, Homes, Nutritious Foods
However, these kids are not at higher risk of developing obesity, the research added. Pixabay

Young kids, who grow up in homes with limited access to nutritious foods are more likely to experience poor overall health and developmental problems, says a new study.

However, these kids are not at higher risk of developing obesity, the research added.

For the findings, published in the journal Pediatrics, the researchers analysed data from 28,184 racially and ethnically diverse children between one to four years primarily from low-income households in five US cities that participated in Children’s HealthWatch, an ongoing network of pediatric and public health researchers that monitors how economic hardships relate to the healthy development and growth of children.

“We did find, however, that growing up in a low-income community — typically with a lack of access to healthy grocery stores, an overabundance of fast food chains, and few safe areas to play outdoors – increased a preschooler’s risk of developing obesity regardless of food security,” said study leader Maureen Black, Professor at University of British Columbia.

Young Kids, Homes, Nutritious Foods
Young kids, who grow up in homes with limited access to nutritious foods are more likely to experience poor overall health and developmental problems, says a new study. Pixabay

“This is quite alarming and indicates a significant public health issue,” Black said.

Data were stratified by every year of age from birth to one year and up to four years of age, the study said.

According to the researchers, about 27 per cent of the children in the study lived in households that had food insecurity, including more than 13 per cent in extremely deprived households with child food insecurity.

The vast majority of households in the study qualified for federal and state food assistance programmes that provided supplemental nutrition.

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The researchers identified food security based on interviews, using a standard questionnaire, with mothers of the children conducted by the Children’s HealthWatch.

While the study did not find a link between food insecurity and obesity risk, it did find that food insecurity was associated with significantly increased risks of a child being in poor health and experiencing a developmental delay, with the odds increasing with a child’s age up to age four. (IANS)

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Just 8.7 Per cent of Homes in South Asia Have an IoT Device

The findings are scheduled to be presented at the Usenix Security Conference 2019 to be held in California, US from August 14-16

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Cisco, Network, IT
There is an explosion of the Internet of Things (IoT), Blockchain and other disruptive technologies. Flickr

Just 8.7 per cent of homes in South Asia have Internet of Things (IoT) or “connected” devices such as Internet-enabled TVs or surveillance camera against a global average of 40 per cent, new research said on Monday.

In North America, on the other hand, 66 per cent households now have at least one IoT device, said the study conducted by cyberseucirty firm Avast in collaboration with Stanford University.

The researchers found that media devices like smart TVs are most common in seven of 11 global regions but there is significant variance otherwise.

For example, surveillance cameras are most popular in South and Southeast Asia, while work appliances prevail in East Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Home assistants are present in 10 per cent of homes in North America but are yet to see significant adoption in other markets.

While nearly half of North American homes have an Internet-connected TV or streaming device, less than three per cent do in South Asia, the findings showed.

IoT
Picture Courtesy:-industrialtrainingjalandhar.net

For the study, Avast scanned 83 million IoT devices in 16 million homes worldwide to understand the distribution and security profile of IoT devices by type and manufacturer.

It revealed that even with over 14,000 IoT manufacturers worldwide, 94 per cent of all IoT devices are manufactured by just 100 vendors.

“A key finding of this paper is that 94 per cent of the home IoT devices were made by fewer than 100 vendors, and half are made by just ten vendors,” said Rajarshi Gupta, Head of AI at Avast.

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“This puts these manufacturers in a unique position to ensure that consumers have access to devices with strong privacy and security by design,” Gupta said.

Over seven per cent of all IoT devices still use obsolete protocols like FTP and Telnet, making them especially vulnerable.

The findings are scheduled to be presented at the Usenix Security Conference 2019 to be held in California, US from August 14-16. (IANS)